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  • Studes as daily drivers.

    I'm just curious, who here uses their Studebaker as a daily driver?
    I get drive mine everyday. I sometimes feel very out of place goin
    g down the highway with all the transportation pods, but I wouldn't have it any other way.

  • #2
    There's probably more people daily driving their Studes than you think commander. I try to, (during the good weather here), and usually get 5 or 6 days a week in mine.

    Sonny
    http://RacingStudebakers.com
    Sonny
    http://RacingStudebakers.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Oh BABY![}] DRIVING a Stude - THAT'S where it's at for me! Don't have to be gleaming and perfect. Just has to be a rolling testament to better times when cars had soul and you could tell what kind one was from half a mile off!
      Went to a local car show this weekend (didn't "show" the Transtar I drive because I loathe wasting time in a lawn chair). It was, predictably, your basic F*rd 'n Chebby show. *YAWN*[|)] ALL of them, of course, without one tiny stone chip or frayed bit of carpet.[)]

      What's the use???? What IS the use? Four wheels for the road and one for the driver and they're all turned into curios for a sort of travelling museum. That's not the fate they were designed for.[xx(] All of the entries were overchromed and underused. What a waste.

      If I'm gonna pour money and sweat into a car, it's gonna thrill me on the road, not in the garage.[8] An old Stude, goin' down the road with dead paint, is much more exciting than some old Detroit pablum, painted prettier than it ever was when new and backed up against the curb with it's hood up as tho it was broke down![xx(]

      Miscreant at large.
      No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

      Comment


      • #4
        If I didn't live in the rust and pothole capitol of the world, I'd drive nothing BUT Studebakers!

        Studedude 1961

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        • #5
          Everyday unless it snows. Oh, and I never let it get dirty Has anyone that drives a Stude everyday gotten lectured about driving it? I've had several people tell me I should just store mine and "preserve" it. Yes, I hate to see the miles clicking by, but I feel like that's what it was designed for...DRIVING, not sitting in a garage somewhere. Maybe I should have a beatup Stude to drive everyday, but I really love my shiny Cruiser, and it sure makes people smile--especially the schmuck behind the wheel[)]
          ________________________
          Mark Anderson
          http://home.alltel.net/anderm
          1965 Studebaker Cruiser

          Comment


          • #6
            Snow!!!??? What's that!!?? Hardly ever snows here in Louisiana, so the Studebakers get a good workout. Back in the early eighty's though it did get awfully cold... down to about 5 degrees!!! Left my 1950 Champion out that night (didn't have a garage), went out to start it [u]</u>with 6 volt system!![u]</u> and after barely turning over 3 times, it started!!

            Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker
            Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker

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            • #7
              I don't use ANY car as a daily driver in London, but when it's reasonably fine and I don't expect to have to find a parking space I take any opportunity to drive the Speedster - just to brighten the lives of less fortunate folk. I always feel the car looks it's best glittering in the sun and most exotic in lit, city streets at night - and always, if possible - in motion. Sometimes we go out for a drive just to overcome a desperate need to show off!

              In relation to recent postings about gas mileage I haven't had the courage to work it out, though out of town it's not too bad I suppose. In town one thinks of gallons per hour rather than miles per gallon.

              Peter.

              Comment


              • #8
                Lectured to? Yeah - sure. Those are the same folks that can't be bothered to bring their Stude to local chapter meetings. Too much trouble Of course, they're also the same ones who grumble about what a pain these old clunkers can be to get to run decent anymore. (never mind that the thing just sits most of the year![xx(])
                There's lots of nice "preserved" ones in museums - along with other mummified objects.[}]
                Now, can you prang it? Sure enough![:0] And it can be a heartbreaker - Mr.Biggs knows that firsthand. Some Idjit totalled m Transtar back in '95.[xx(] And while it took time to rebuild it (make it lots better, in fact), I eventually returned it to daily duty. I figure whoever it happens to gravitate to after my driving days are done - he can be the one to treat it like a museum piece. Besides, by then, I may not be able to buy gasoline to run it on anymore.[V]

                I might add that the car show I mentioned earlier - even tho the windshield placards said that most the cars were locally owned, there were maybe TWO that I ever recall seeing on the road around here. What a shame! I can't fathom owning something as beautifully restored as some of those cars were and being terrified of driving for fear it might get dirty or scratched!

                Miscreant at large.
                No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I really don't understand why they're not driven--after all it IS the Studebaker Drivers Club. I live in Louisville and I've said this before, but it's still true. Since I started driving a Studebaker daily on February 28th, I've not seen but ONE other Studebaker on the road. There is a customized 50 Starlight that runs around that I've seen a few times but I don't know who the owner is. Other than that, I've not seen one other Studebaker on the road or parked anywhere.

                  I was talking to a neighbor friend of mine the other night. He's trying to get me involved in car shows, and while I'd love to do that it seems like everytime a show or cruise comes up--I'm busy or out of town. Anyway, he's got a 1963 Corvair Monza convertible. It's been restored and is a nice car--but no nicer than my Studebaker, maybe not AS nice. It's one of those cars that LOOKS restored. Do you know what I mean? The paint is really nice and the whole car looks good, but when you get close you can see the rubber is bad, the chrome is pitted and various other things wrong/missing. I guess maybe the paint on the car looks TOO good compared to the rest of the car. Anyway, he's afraid to drive it. He drove by yesterday while I was in the driveway using a California duster on the Stude. He was in his Toyota. He said that he still can't believe I drive that Stude everyday--it should be parked in the garage. If I gotta park it, I don't want it!

                  I'm probably prejudiced, but my Cruiser looks like maybe a 2 year old vehicle. There's a few rock chips on the hood and a tiny rust bubble on the front fender, but the paint and chrome is so nice. I've had several people ask me where I had the interior redone--it's original as is the dash. It's probably the best 65 dash I've seen. So, while it's likely it's going to get scratched or bumped, that's part of it. I'll fix the problem and move on.

                  Prang it? Darn I hope not. I've read the thread about the Hawk from Hell and learned a bit from that--got me a fire extinguisher yesterday[}]

                  Right now I'm sitting in my 2nd floor office, and I can see my Stude parked in the parking lot less than 50 feet away under a nice shady tree.

                  It LOOKS happy--anyway

                  ________________________
                  Mark Anderson
                  http://home.alltel.net/anderm
                  1965 Studebaker Cruiser

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The other day, someone asked me why I love old cars so much, (this poor soul was driving a Saturn at the time). I told them that old cars make people happy. When Stuart and I go out, I cannot count how many waves or thumbs up I get. An old car reminds older people of happier days, an old car shows a younger generation that there was a time when cars were different. I do volunteer work at our local auto museum. Mr. Al Uhrine is the general manager of the collection. When he took over in 1999, only 10% of the collection ran, the rest had pretty paint jobs and a rope in front of them. Since he started the volunteer program, 75% of our collection is running. You haven't lived until you park a 1919 Locomobile Tourning next to a 1957 Chevy at a cruise.

                    I do enjoy going to cruises, mainly because I love 50s music. I was born in 1958, so I missed it first hand. I take Stuart and I always get at least three comments, "What is it?, My grandfater hand one and my favorite, at least its not a 57 Chevy."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My 59 Lark 2dr wagon is my daily driver. 259, auto trans.
                      While I am on a bike for my work commute (40+ mpg!). The Lark is the car that sits in the driveway waiting it's next command to go.
                      6 years, and only let me down once. And even then, not stranded, it did get me home.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Daily driver? Yeah. My problem is that mine don't always want to go out daily.[}] Like me they have the aches and pains of old age and hard usage.[:I]

                        Lotsa Larks!
                        Studeclunker
                        A.K.A: out2lunch
                        Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                        K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                        Ron Smith
                        Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I think the reason so many people don't drive their classic's is due to the fact that most people spend most of their money restoring the cosmetics of their car and only do the minimum to get them running. I don't care what brand of car you have they all need new wiring, and complete mechanical overhauls. Even if they have low mileage, that doesn't mean a thing. You still have a 40-50+ year old car with old wiring etc. Most people I know that have their old car leave them stranded have an electrical problems, a 40 year old hose blow or a belt snap. The people I know that drive their old car frequently, have cars with perfect mechanicals and so-so cosmetics. Shinny paint doesn't make a car run better. One must remember that road conditions and the quality of oils has so vastly improved that is why a new engine can go 100k miles today. Put some of that 1950's oil in your new car drive on dirt roads and you might not get 10K miles before the engine is toast. Everything on an old car is so overbuilt compared to todays cars because that's what it took to make it last 3 years with the bad oils that were used in the day.

                          Restore it, don't replace it.Keep the Studebaker reproduction industry going

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I hope I'm not going to get myself stranded today, but as far as I know, mechanically my car is nearly perfect. I've been over every inch of it and much has been replaced. But, I don't think it'll be a belt, hose, bushing, brake line, etc that will leave me stranded. It'll be something stupid (or big).

                            I want reliability. My Stude is more reliable than any of the later American iron I've owned.

                            ________________________
                            Mark Anderson
                            http://home.alltel.net/anderm
                            1965 Studebaker Cruiser

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I wanna say - up front - that I hold high respect for those that have to put their Studes up for the winter to preserve them. I'd do the same if I lived in that sorta climate. (Although, having grown up in Michigan - I wouldn't ever move back there voluntarily!) So...

                              Gripe about the "Drivers" aspect in Studebaker Drivers Club not being held true to and you'll get lots of defensive remarks. And tho I won't argue whether or not the defensive remarks ARE well-based, I will admit it's a matter of perspective.
                              It depends on what you get outta your Stude ownership that determines your stance on driving. While I confess, I can't for the life of me - see the attraction to a bunch of dust-collecting trophies, to some, those are validation for investment of money and/or time. For me, there's the payoff of seeing folks take notice while I pass them or they pass me on the open road. Lotsa folks that would never attend a car show will notice your Stude and make an appreciative gesture in response. Fact is, a gesture's not always necessary to realize someone's noticed your cool, old South Bend beauty!
                              You'll see one occupant of the car nudge another and nod your way - or you'll sometimes be able to read their lips as they say "Stu Dee Baker". And ya hafta wonder how many fond tales you evoke in your wake as people recall moments where a Stude was part of their life. Also, I often wonder what sorta ersazts "facts" of Studebakers are sometimes shared by the resident car "expert" in a given vehicle! "Yup, they's still a-buildin' them things up in Canada!" Ah well....

                              Is it a head trip - driving a Stude? Of course it is But that's not ALL there is to it. It's truly a chance to enjoy a bit of a time machine of your own, if you will.[^] There's nothing like toolin' down the road in a car that most folks only expect to see in a museum or a rod show. What a point of pride to know that YOU keep the Studebaker saga going by keeping one of them alive and active.

                              A couple weeks ago, I parked the Transtar in a local mall parking lot. As I locked the door, I heard the unmistakeable sound of big, radial aircraft engines overhead. I looked skyward and there, silouetted against the evening sky, was a B-17 Flying Fortress lumbering along. There's a dwindling number of flyable B-17s still going. And the organizations that keep them going, do so as a memorial to all who were involved with them in their heyday. Whether it was as a crewmember or on the production line, the remaining B-17s are a testament to what was.
                              After the B-17 left my field of vision, I turned and headed towards the store. At one point, I glanced back at the Transtar and noted that it looked lost among the sea of modern-day transportation "appliances" around it. I thought about the B-17 I'd just watched and I said to myself: "Yeah, that's why I do it! I do it to keep the faith for my little corner of interest in history."

                              Miscreant at large.
                              No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                              Comment

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