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What is 197127???

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  • What is 197127???

    This has no apperant reason... I saw another post about wooden Studebaker crates and this got me thinking. In my collection, I have two wood parts crates that I got from Sasco. They are origional from Studebaker, and have the part numbers stencel painted on the front for fast ID. On the one, it says "197127" for the part number. I searced the number and nothing came up. I can believe this, as with those crates, no two are alike. Does anybody know what a 197127 is[?] I'm just curious as to what was in my box at one time.

    Chris Dresbach. South Bend, In.

    1940 Champion two door.
    Parts of the 1952 Model N prototype.
    1963 Prototype moon cart built by Studebaker.
    Chris Dresbach

  • #2
    Chris: Part Number 197127 is shown in the 3R Truck Parts Book as a Wheel Cylinder Rubber Boot.
    Since your number is on a wooden crate, perhaps those boots arrived in large quantity, crated. Admittedly, that seems a bit odd, as I would think wheel cylinders would arrive from their manufacturer as complete assemblies.

    Nonetheless, for whatever reason, that Part Number is shown only as the boot portion of the entire wheel cylinder assembly. (Two per wheel cylinder, of course.) [:0] [8D]BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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    • #3
      Thanks Bob. Yeah, it is strange that they didn't come as assembeled units. What's weird is that neither of my crates are that big, about a foot wide X a foot and a half long X by a foot tall. Here's a picture of the crate:


      Chris Dresbach. South Bend, In.

      1940 Champion two door.
      Parts of the 1952 Model N prototype.
      1963 Prototype moon cart built by Studebaker.
      Chris Dresbach

      Comment


      • #4
        Chris, those aren't crates, they are storage bins used to hold parts on the shelves at Plant 8. The only time they were used for "shipping" was for the trip from Plant 8 to either Standard Surplus or Avanti Parts Corp. They then made the trip from 405 W Sample to 410 W Sample and now on to Plant 3.
        The reason those boots were not part of a wheel cylinder assy. is because they are cataloged as service parts, ie. available seperately to be used to repair or replace a worn or damaged part of an assembly.

        R2Andy

        The Truck part number written in below just means that the bin was reused to hold a different part after the supply of boots was used up. It dates to a much more recent vintage.
        R2Andrea

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        • #5
          I had a feeling that those came from plant 8.

          Chris Dresbach. South Bend, In.

          1940 Champion two door.
          Parts of the 1952 Model N prototype.
          1963 Prototype moon cart built by Studebaker.
          Chris Dresbach

          Comment


          • #6
            What Andy said, Chris. (Thanks, Andy.)

            Shipping crates are usually defined as "strong enough" wooden containers to send heavy parts like engine or transmission assemblies to dealers or far-away parts depots.

            While shipping crates are sometimes returned nowadays, they were rarely returned when Studebaker was in business. The dealer or other recipient would just knock the crate down and use the scrap lumber for some primative purpose, like burning it for heat. [8D]BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment

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