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  • Oldest daily driver

    I was just wondering who on the forum has the oldest daily driver. Even if it's a daily driver in the nice months it counts. Any pre-war daily drivers?

    "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

  • #2
    It can be a 1942 Champ or a 1929 F**d roadster, depends on the weather. I seldom drive late model in the summer.
    Klif

    55 Speedster
    42 Champ Coupe
    55 Speedster/Street Machine
    63 Avanti R2
    64 Convertible R1

    Comment


    • #3
      It can be a 1942 Champ or a 1929 F**d roadster, depends on the weather. I seldom drive late model in the summer.
      Klif

      55 Speedster
      42 Champ Coupe
      55 Speedster/Street Machine
      63 Avanti R2
      64 Convertible R1

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi all,
        last year I parked my 88 Avanti boring ragtop car and used my 1937 Australian built Studebaker as my only transport from early Feb to July.

        It did fine. Mid 30's Studebakers are great driving cars and powerful enough to move comfortably at 70 to 80 mph. Just as reliablbe, and a little bit more exciting to drive than the more modern Studebakers.

        On the motorways over here they drive at 90mph in the fast lane, sometimes 100 + but you will get booked at over 90 by the fuzz if you get caught.

        This year I have been a bit lame and hardly driven my 30's cars. My new 63 Lark is about to get plated for UK use

        Happy drives blokes and remember to wave at other Stude dudes if you ever pass them on the frog and toad.

        Greg

        Greg Diffen
        Australian Stude nut living in Warwick, United Kingdom

        1933 St Regis Brougham Model 56 Dutch delivered
        1937 Dicator sedan. Australian Body by TJ Richards
        1939 Packard Seven Passenger monster UK delivered
        1939 Commander Swiss Cabriolet by Lagenthal
        1988 Avanti Convertible
        Greg Diffen

        Editor Studebaker Owners Club UK magazine

        Australian Stude guy living in Warwick, United Kingdom

        1933 St Regis Brougham Model 56 delivered new in the Netherlands
        1937 Dictator sedan Australian Body by TJ Richards RHC
        1937 Packard Super 8 Limousine UK delivered RHC
        1939 Packard Super 8 Seven Passenger sedan monster UK delivered RHC
        1939 Commander Cabriolet by Lagenthal of Switzerland
        1963 Lark Daytona Hardtop
        1988 Avanti Convertible

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi all,
          last year I parked my 88 Avanti boring ragtop car and used my 1937 Australian built Studebaker as my only transport from early Feb to July.

          It did fine. Mid 30's Studebakers are great driving cars and powerful enough to move comfortably at 70 to 80 mph. Just as reliablbe, and a little bit more exciting to drive than the more modern Studebakers.

          On the motorways over here they drive at 90mph in the fast lane, sometimes 100 + but you will get booked at over 90 by the fuzz if you get caught.

          This year I have been a bit lame and hardly driven my 30's cars. My new 63 Lark is about to get plated for UK use

          Happy drives blokes and remember to wave at other Stude dudes if you ever pass them on the frog and toad.

          Greg

          Greg Diffen
          Australian Stude nut living in Warwick, United Kingdom

          1933 St Regis Brougham Model 56 Dutch delivered
          1937 Dicator sedan. Australian Body by TJ Richards
          1939 Packard Seven Passenger monster UK delivered
          1939 Commander Swiss Cabriolet by Lagenthal
          1988 Avanti Convertible
          Greg Diffen

          Editor Studebaker Owners Club UK magazine

          Australian Stude guy living in Warwick, United Kingdom

          1933 St Regis Brougham Model 56 delivered new in the Netherlands
          1937 Dictator sedan Australian Body by TJ Richards RHC
          1937 Packard Super 8 Limousine UK delivered RHC
          1939 Packard Super 8 Seven Passenger sedan monster UK delivered RHC
          1939 Commander Cabriolet by Lagenthal of Switzerland
          1963 Lark Daytona Hardtop
          1988 Avanti Convertible

          Comment


          • #6
            I have modernized quite a bit now just because as some of us grow older we grow softer and enjoy such "luxuries" as windshield washers, but in the late 1990s/early 2000s I had two daily drivers that I drove most days, winter or summer: A 1964 Rambler Classic 660 and a 1965 Commander 6. Both were wonderful cars, even in snow. The 660 developed fatal engine problems and the 1965 was sold to "save it" from the elements when I moved and didn't have a garage for it. Regular readers to this forum may remember that I found this car about 3 years after I sold it parked on a side street here in my new neighborhood absolutely filthy and with both passenger side doors caved in from what I imagine was a T-bone accident. So much for selling Studebakers to save them. Anyhow, I would highly recommend buying older good old cars for daily drivers...particularly those that will never amount to much dollar wise but can provide the kind of motoring enjoyment that mere money can't buy.

            Studedude1961
            --1963 Cruiser

            Comment


            • #7
              I have modernized quite a bit now just because as some of us grow older we grow softer and enjoy such "luxuries" as windshield washers, but in the late 1990s/early 2000s I had two daily drivers that I drove most days, winter or summer: A 1964 Rambler Classic 660 and a 1965 Commander 6. Both were wonderful cars, even in snow. The 660 developed fatal engine problems and the 1965 was sold to "save it" from the elements when I moved and didn't have a garage for it. Regular readers to this forum may remember that I found this car about 3 years after I sold it parked on a side street here in my new neighborhood absolutely filthy and with both passenger side doors caved in from what I imagine was a T-bone accident. So much for selling Studebakers to save them. Anyhow, I would highly recommend buying older good old cars for daily drivers...particularly those that will never amount to much dollar wise but can provide the kind of motoring enjoyment that mere money can't buy.

              Studedude1961
              --1963 Cruiser

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm impressed that there actually are pre-war drivers out there. I find there's nothing wrong with driving an old car every day if it's in good enough shape to be used. In the 1960s my father had a 1933 Plymouth for his daily driver for a while. It was only 30 something years old, but it seems like it was much more out of date then than our 40+ year old Studebakers are now. I suppose the autombile changed much more fundamentally between the 1930s and 1960s, than the 1960s to today. I just know absolutley no-one else I ever saw as a kid was driving a 30 year old car everyday.

                Any others?

                I wonder if any Amish are still using Studebaker buggies or if they always made their own.
                "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm impressed that there actually are pre-war drivers out there. I find there's nothing wrong with driving an old car every day if it's in good enough shape to be used. In the 1960s my father had a 1933 Plymouth for his daily driver for a while. It was only 30 something years old, but it seems like it was much more out of date then than our 40+ year old Studebakers are now. I suppose the autombile changed much more fundamentally between the 1930s and 1960s, than the 1960s to today. I just know absolutley no-one else I ever saw as a kid was driving a 30 year old car everyday.

                  Any others?

                  I wonder if any Amish are still using Studebaker buggies or if they always made their own.
                  "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My mechanically sound but fairly beat up '41 Commander was a daily driver on a 20 mile commute for about 5 years. Its been shelved since the fuel pump stranded me. Pump is now rebuilt, but the carb occasionally runs dry. Next step is to determine whetherits got a pin hole in the gas line, or the float is hanging up.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My mechanically sound but fairly beat up '41 Commander was a daily driver on a 20 mile commute for about 5 years. Its been shelved since the fuel pump stranded me. Pump is now rebuilt, but the carb occasionally runs dry. Next step is to determine whetherits got a pin hole in the gas line, or the float is hanging up.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I drive my '59 truck everyday, rain or shine. It's been pretty dependable too. [^]

                        __________________________________

                        Matthew Burnette
                        Hazlehurst, Georgia
                        '59 Scotsman PU
                        '63 Daytona HT


                        http://mbstudebaker.blogspot.com/


                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I drive my '59 truck everyday, rain or shine. It's been pretty dependable too. [^]

                          __________________________________

                          Matthew Burnette
                          Hazlehurst, Georgia
                          '59 Scotsman PU
                          '63 Daytona HT


                          http://mbstudebaker.blogspot.com/


                          Comment


                          • #14
                            quote:but the carb occasionally runs dry. Next step is to determine whetherits got a pin hole in the gas line, or the float is hanging up.
                            Skyway,
                            It could be the coating has worn off the body of the carb and it's evaporating through the porous casting. Dave Thibeault rechromates his carb rebuilds.
                            "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                            Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                            Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                            sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              quote:but the carb occasionally runs dry. Next step is to determine whetherits got a pin hole in the gas line, or the float is hanging up.
                              Skyway,
                              It could be the coating has worn off the body of the carb and it's evaporating through the porous casting. Dave Thibeault rechromates his carb rebuilds.
                              "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                              Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                              Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                              sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                              Comment

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