Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Restoring paper documents

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Restoring paper documents

    Gentlemen,,,My original dealer sales document from 1964 is in need of a little restoration. It has black stuff on the bottom part of it that I suspect is some kind of mold, etc. And no, it isn't grease, etc. How does one go about looking for someone to restore paper? We all know, to some degree or another, how to restore the metal, etc that our cars are made out of, but sometimes the papers are just as important. Suggestions on how to, or where to go are greatly appreciated. Thanks

  • #2
    Try contacting a local historical society or museum (the bigger the better). They may have some DIY suggestions or you might want to send it out to an expert.

    63 Avanti R1 2788
    1914 Stutz Bearcat
    (George Barris replica)

    Washington State
    63 Avanti R1 2788
    1914 Stutz Bearcat
    (George Barris replica)

    Washington State

    Comment


    • #3
      Try contacting a local historical society or museum (the bigger the better). They may have some DIY suggestions or you might want to send it out to an expert.

      63 Avanti R1 2788
      1914 Stutz Bearcat
      (George Barris replica)

      Washington State
      63 Avanti R1 2788
      1914 Stutz Bearcat
      (George Barris replica)

      Washington State

      Comment


      • #4
        As usual, Google is your friend:
        http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q...=Google+Search

        64 Commander 2 dr.
        64 Daytona HT
        63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk (Black) #2
        63 Avanti R1
        63 Daytona convert
        63 Lark 2 door
        63 Lark 2 door #2
        62 Daytona HT/ 4 speed
        62 Lark 2 door
        62 GT Hawk 4 speed
        60 Lark HT
        60 Hawk
        59 3E truck
        52 Starliner
        51 Commander

        JDP Maryland

        Comment


        • #5
          As usual, Google is your friend:
          http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q...=Google+Search

          64 Commander 2 dr.
          64 Daytona HT
          63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk (Black) #2
          63 Avanti R1
          63 Daytona convert
          63 Lark 2 door
          63 Lark 2 door #2
          62 Daytona HT/ 4 speed
          62 Lark 2 door
          62 GT Hawk 4 speed
          60 Lark HT
          60 Hawk
          59 3E truck
          52 Starliner
          51 Commander

          JDP Maryland

          Comment


          • #6
            If you have a college or university in your area that has a "Library Science" program, contact them. I know people who have gone through the program at USC and one of the projects they have to do is part of a disaster recovery project where they have to take books and paper that have been flooded, torn, etc. I think with the flooded paperwork, they freeze-dry it to remove the moisture.

            Lee

            Comment


            • #7
              If you have a college or university in your area that has a "Library Science" program, contact them. I know people who have gone through the program at USC and one of the projects they have to do is part of a disaster recovery project where they have to take books and paper that have been flooded, torn, etc. I think with the flooded paperwork, they freeze-dry it to remove the moisture.

              Lee

              Comment


              • #8
                I learned some of this stuff when I got my MLS degree (library science) but I didn't specialize in it. There are certain solutions that can be used, but it would take a little research to find out what. I had learned how to repair tears, etc. There are certain techniques that do a good job. Very soft gum erasers can be used to gently pick up the stain, but you have to make sure the eraser is for that purpose. Gently press and lift up, don't rub.

                The main thing with paper items is to keep them in a stable environment and out of direct sunlight. Variations in temperature can deteriorate paper over time, so that's why a stable enviroment is best. Do not paste paper using anything but archival glue. Don't use scotch tape. there are special tapes and adhesives that will not hurt the paper in the long run.

                There are archival supply houses (maybe I'll do a search and find out where I got my things several years ago). They can supply such things as mylar type enclosures, which are acid free, acid free tissue paper to put between paper items, and other supplies like special glues, etc. I keep all my old Studebaker letters in a box made of acid free mat-board with acid free sheets between most of the items.

                Another bad thing to do is have your item in close contact with newspaper or stuck in a book. Some papers have a high acidity and that's what yellows the paper over time (well, one of the things). Such contact will over time help destroy and mark either the item you put in the book or the book.

                Of course, there are some stains that are almost impossible to get out. Mold is nasty, and I doubt you'll ever get the stain completely out, but with the right techniques, you might be able to lighten it considerably. If I find some of my old notes I'll let you know.
                "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I learned some of this stuff when I got my MLS degree (library science) but I didn't specialize in it. There are certain solutions that can be used, but it would take a little research to find out what. I had learned how to repair tears, etc. There are certain techniques that do a good job. Very soft gum erasers can be used to gently pick up the stain, but you have to make sure the eraser is for that purpose. Gently press and lift up, don't rub.

                  The main thing with paper items is to keep them in a stable environment and out of direct sunlight. Variations in temperature can deteriorate paper over time, so that's why a stable enviroment is best. Do not paste paper using anything but archival glue. Don't use scotch tape. there are special tapes and adhesives that will not hurt the paper in the long run.

                  There are archival supply houses (maybe I'll do a search and find out where I got my things several years ago). They can supply such things as mylar type enclosures, which are acid free, acid free tissue paper to put between paper items, and other supplies like special glues, etc. I keep all my old Studebaker letters in a box made of acid free mat-board with acid free sheets between most of the items.

                  Another bad thing to do is have your item in close contact with newspaper or stuck in a book. Some papers have a high acidity and that's what yellows the paper over time (well, one of the things). Such contact will over time help destroy and mark either the item you put in the book or the book.

                  Of course, there are some stains that are almost impossible to get out. Mold is nasty, and I doubt you'll ever get the stain completely out, but with the right techniques, you might be able to lighten it considerably. If I find some of my old notes I'll let you know.
                  "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As for keeping your documents in acid free bags, go to your local comic book store. They will have a complete line of acid free bags and backing boards designed just for that purpose. Also, try this site for restoration: www.interlog.com/~restore

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      As for keeping your documents in acid free bags, go to your local comic book store. They will have a complete line of acid free bags and backing boards designed just for that purpose. Also, try this site for restoration: www.interlog.com/~restore

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A friend of mine has glossy instruction sheets for a turbocharger and the pages have been in water and are stuck together. How does one separate the sheets ??...........Brad

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A friend of mine has glossy instruction sheets for a turbocharger and the pages have been in water and are stuck together. How does one separate the sheets ??...........Brad

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Brad, the freeze drying method may work, but it probably would need to be done by a professional, mainly because they ought to have the right kind of equipment. It may not be worth the expense, though.
                            "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Brad, the freeze drying method may work, but it probably would need to be done by a professional, mainly because they ought to have the right kind of equipment. It may not be worth the expense, though.
                              "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X