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  • MT's 62 GT Hawk road test quote...

    From the Feb '62 issue of Motor Trend regarding the "new" Gran Turismo Hawk (remember, this is a quote, not me saying this):
    "While we racked up over a thousand miles behind the wheel of the GT and relished every minute of it, we don't think it's a car that the little lady will enjoy driving (our's didn't). But then that's what the right-hand seat is designed for. All she has to do is sit back in that big, comfortable bucket, relax, keep reasonably quiet, and be secure in the fact that THIS car was designed with her particular man in mind"
    Later on they go on to say:
    "This is one car that has been a real pleasure to drive and one that we think offers the man in the family something quite a bit different in family-pleasure type transportation. And make no mistake about it--the Hawk GT is strictly a man's car and S-P's new president, Sherwood H. Egbert, deserves at least one free round wherever real men congregate for having the guts to buck the frilly feminine-oriented thinking that has crept into American automotive styling during the last decade."

    I better not let my wife see this or
    [B)] !
    I wonder what the writer would think of the Smart Car!

    Todd


    63 Lark 2dr Sedan


  • #2
    Was that Uncle Tom Cahill writing?
    That would never fly in today's Politically Correct world.

    Chris Pile
    The Studebaker Special
    Midway Chapter SDC
    The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

    Comment


    • #3
      Was that Uncle Tom Cahill writing?
      That would never fly in today's Politically Correct world.

      Chris Pile
      The Studebaker Special
      Midway Chapter SDC
      The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

      Comment


      • #4
        I am old enough to have read that article when it first appeared, and remember it very well. The "man's car" characterization has stuck with me all these years. It almost caused me to buy a new GT, but I had just purchased a slightly used 62 Impala convertible, and I really wanted a convertible. I still have the Chevy, and never did get around to buying a GT Hawk. If only Stude had offered a GT convertible . . . . .

        Skip Lackie
        Washington DC
        Skip Lackie

        Comment


        • #5
          I am old enough to have read that article when it first appeared, and remember it very well. The "man's car" characterization has stuck with me all these years. It almost caused me to buy a new GT, but I had just purchased a slightly used 62 Impala convertible, and I really wanted a convertible. I still have the Chevy, and never did get around to buying a GT Hawk. If only Stude had offered a GT convertible . . . . .

          Skip Lackie
          Washington DC
          Skip Lackie

          Comment


          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by Skip Lackie
            The "man's car" characterization has stuck with me all these years.
            That was probably as big of mistake for Studebaker then as it would be today.

            Women comprise 54% of new car buyers.

            http://www.msmoney.com/mm/life_purch...ivers_seat.htm

            Women influence 80 percent of all purchases and have 95 percent veto power regarding automotive purchases.

            http://www.asashop.org/autoinc/jan98/women.htm

            I'll bet the stats were similar in 1962.

            I wonder how many GT's would have been sold if Studebaker had not alienated this (rather large) segment of the market?

            I talked to the daughter last night of the man I bought my GT from. She drove the Hawk a lot. She found it much easier to drive and more fun than her restored '66 Mustang.

            BTW, I hope we aren't insulting to others purely because it's "politically correct" not to do so. I think we often mix up being
            "politically correct" with being considerate and polite. I read the other day that using the term "politically correct" isn't politically correct anymore


            Dick Steinkamp
            Bellingham, WA

            Comment


            • #7
              quote:Originally posted by Skip Lackie
              The "man's car" characterization has stuck with me all these years.
              That was probably as big of mistake for Studebaker then as it would be today.

              Women comprise 54% of new car buyers.

              http://www.msmoney.com/mm/life_purch...ivers_seat.htm

              Women influence 80 percent of all purchases and have 95 percent veto power regarding automotive purchases.

              http://www.asashop.org/autoinc/jan98/women.htm

              I'll bet the stats were similar in 1962.

              I wonder how many GT's would have been sold if Studebaker had not alienated this (rather large) segment of the market?

              I talked to the daughter last night of the man I bought my GT from. She drove the Hawk a lot. She found it much easier to drive and more fun than her restored '66 Mustang.

              BTW, I hope we aren't insulting to others purely because it's "politically correct" not to do so. I think we often mix up being
              "politically correct" with being considerate and polite. I read the other day that using the term "politically correct" isn't politically correct anymore


              Dick Steinkamp
              Bellingham, WA

              Comment


              • #8
                It's similar to an ad for the 67 Plymouth GTX where they talk about the 440 GTX and then when they talk about the HEMI option they state "Move over honey and let the MAN drive".
                Todd

                63 Lark 2dr Sedan

                Comment


                • #9
                  It's similar to an ad for the 67 Plymouth GTX where they talk about the 440 GTX and then when they talk about the HEMI option they state "Move over honey and let the MAN drive".
                  Todd

                  63 Lark 2dr Sedan

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Gosh, I always had the opposite feeling about Studebaker's advertising, and when I drove the Lark to college, many of my friends called it an old lady schoolteacher's car, until I showed them how fast it was. Of course my 62 GT Hawk seemed different. It felt more like a man's car than the Lark, although my sister liked to drive it, except for the 4 speed.

                    If you look at Studebaker's ads from the beginning of car production, they consistently featured women at the wheel, with sometimes a man sitting in the passenger seat which was rare until the 70s.

                    Here are some early ads. Of course this first one would probably be considered sexist today.


















                    Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Gosh, I always had the opposite feeling about Studebaker's advertising, and when I drove the Lark to college, many of my friends called it an old lady schoolteacher's car, until I showed them how fast it was. Of course my 62 GT Hawk seemed different. It felt more like a man's car than the Lark, although my sister liked to drive it, except for the 4 speed.

                      If you look at Studebaker's ads from the beginning of car production, they consistently featured women at the wheel, with sometimes a man sitting in the passenger seat which was rare until the 70s.

                      Here are some early ads. Of course this first one would probably be considered sexist today.


















                      Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        All I know, is when I drive my GT, women absolutely adore it. I get more comments from women than men about the styling. I also have to say, the younger (under 25) absolutely drool over it. Let's also not forget the '37s were advertised as "Designed by Helen Dryden"


                        Chris Kot
                        '63 GT Hawk
                        '37 Dictator Rod Project

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          All I know, is when I drive my GT, women absolutely adore it. I get more comments from women than men about the styling. I also have to say, the younger (under 25) absolutely drool over it. Let's also not forget the '37s were advertised as "Designed by Helen Dryden"


                          Chris Kot
                          '63 GT Hawk
                          '37 Dictator Rod Project

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Back when I owned several GTs I also found that women noticed that car first. They liked the styling.
                            Remember, the quote that started this post was from a MAGAZINE, not from Studebaker or their advertising department. It was the male writing the article who had the identity problem.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Back when I owned several GTs I also found that women noticed that car first. They liked the styling.
                              Remember, the quote that started this post was from a MAGAZINE, not from Studebaker or their advertising department. It was the male writing the article who had the identity problem.

                              Comment

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