Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Studebakers in the Roanoke Transportation Museum

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Studebakers in the Roanoke Transportation Museum

    I visited the Roanoke (Virginia) Transportation Museum over the weekend and they have several Studebakers there. The museum is in the old Norfolk & Western Railroad building and there are also many trains including one that was designed by Raymond Loewy.

    There was this Studebaker buggy. I am not sure the Studebaker script is correct on this one.



    They also have a 50 Commander Land Cruiser.



    And a 62 Lark Taxi that was in service in Roanoke in the 60s. I will post more photos of it in a separate thread.



    They have a 1920s Studebaker touring car with right hand drive. It also has a weird radiator emblem.



    And this 53 Studebaker that I will also post in a separate thread. This car and the touring car were not on display, but were being kept in the storage area.



    Below is the steam locomotive that was designed by Raymond Loewy for the Pennsylvania Railroad.



    Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

  • #2
    Why am I not surprised that my all time favourite Steam Locomotive was designed by Lowey? That thing is a beautiful sight to behold. I've seen footage of it in use for Railfan specials and it's really beautiful under steam![8D]

    The 'buggy' you snapped is actually a very nice Spring Wagon. It has Dennet or 3/4 platform springs in the rear and the back seat can be removed for work. They usually had a removable platform top. A buggy has only one seat. A Surrey is a two-seat buggy. Used to have several supply-your-own-motive-power Studebakers at one time...
    Ah, happy memories of the buggy days...


    Lotsa Larks!
    K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
    Ron Smith
    Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
    Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
    K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
    Ron Smith
    Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

    Comment


    • #3
      Why am I not surprised that my all time favourite Steam Locomotive was designed by Lowey? That thing is a beautiful sight to behold. I've seen footage of it in use for Railfan specials and it's really beautiful under steam![8D]

      The 'buggy' you snapped is actually a very nice Spring Wagon. It has Dennet or 3/4 platform springs in the rear and the back seat can be removed for work. They usually had a removable platform top. A buggy has only one seat. A Surrey is a two-seat buggy. Used to have several supply-your-own-motive-power Studebakers at one time...
      Ah, happy memories of the buggy days...


      Lotsa Larks!
      K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
      Ron Smith
      Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
      Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
      K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
      Ron Smith
      Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

      Comment


      • #4
        Leonard,
        Thanks for the pictures. I'll be working in VA this year maybe I can take off a few minutes when I'm close and check out the museum.

        Gary Sanders
        Nixa, MO
        President Toy Studebaker Collectors Club. Have an interest in Toy Studebakers? Contact me for details.
        Gary Sanders
        Nixa, MO

        Comment


        • #5
          Leonard,
          Thanks for the pictures. I'll be working in VA this year maybe I can take off a few minutes when I'm close and check out the museum.

          Gary Sanders
          Nixa, MO
          President Toy Studebaker Collectors Club. Have an interest in Toy Studebakers? Contact me for details.
          Gary Sanders
          Nixa, MO

          Comment


          • #6
            Leonard...you have WAY too much fun [8D]. You need to get a full time job or something similar .




            Dick Steinkamp
            Bellingham, WA

            Comment


            • #7
              Leonard...you have WAY too much fun [8D]. You need to get a full time job or something similar .




              Dick Steinkamp
              Bellingham, WA

              Comment


              • #8
                quote: Leonard...you have WAY too much fun . You need to get a full time job or something similar .
                Check out my post on the thread: Good excuse for idling restoration work

                http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com...?TOPIC_ID=8364

                I was out digging a footer today when the temperature was 19 degrees!

                And Gary, Let me know when you are in VA. Maybe we can get together.


                Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote: Leonard...you have WAY too much fun . You need to get a full time job or something similar .
                  Check out my post on the thread: Good excuse for idling restoration work

                  http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com...?TOPIC_ID=8364

                  I was out digging a footer today when the temperature was 19 degrees!

                  And Gary, Let me know when you are in VA. Maybe we can get together.


                  Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hello,
                    First time writer, lonnnggg time reader(haha). I'm 25, I own and have been daily driving a 1964 Studebaker Commander with a 63 Hawk R2 engine transplant since 99, or high school. But I digress.
                    I saw your pictures from the Roanoke Mueseum of Transportation. I gotta make a correction to the last photo with the steam locomotive as I'm partial to that railroad line(model railroader) . That is a Norfolk and Western 4-8-4 Class J locomotive 611. That engine was a mainstream engine and later an excursion engine before Norfolk Southern pulled the excursion program in the early eighties(Although they still roll the engine around the grounds so the Timken bearings won't seize). That beauty in the photo was designed and assembled by the Roanoke Shops in-house to pull their passenger trains. The engine Loewy designed was the Pennsylvania S-1 duplexes (6-4-4-6), T-1 duplexes (4-4-4-4), Q-1 duplexes(4-6-4-4), and Q-2 duplexes (4-4-6-4). Pennsylvania did look to the N&W for building the duplexes as well as use the N&W for training their staff. Nonetheless, the Norfolk and Western prided themselves on the Class J for its speed, tractive effort, and that they were built for incredibly smooth operation. Here's is a link to some photos of the Loewy engines. Just scroll down until you see the Pennsylvania section on duplexes. [8D]

                    http://www.steamlocomotive.com/streamlined/scrapped/
                    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hello,
                      First time writer, lonnnggg time reader(haha). I'm 25, I own and have been daily driving a 1964 Studebaker Commander with a 63 Hawk R2 engine transplant since 99, or high school. But I digress.
                      I saw your pictures from the Roanoke Mueseum of Transportation. I gotta make a correction to the last photo with the steam locomotive as I'm partial to that railroad line(model railroader) . That is a Norfolk and Western 4-8-4 Class J locomotive 611. That engine was a mainstream engine and later an excursion engine before Norfolk Southern pulled the excursion program in the early eighties(Although they still roll the engine around the grounds so the Timken bearings won't seize). That beauty in the photo was designed and assembled by the Roanoke Shops in-house to pull their passenger trains. The engine Loewy designed was the Pennsylvania S-1 duplexes (6-4-4-6), T-1 duplexes (4-4-4-4), Q-1 duplexes(4-6-4-4), and Q-2 duplexes (4-4-6-4). Pennsylvania did look to the N&W for building the duplexes as well as use the N&W for training their staff. Nonetheless, the Norfolk and Western prided themselves on the Class J for its speed, tractive effort, and that they were built for incredibly smooth operation. Here's is a link to some photos of the Loewy engines. Just scroll down until you see the Pennsylvania section on duplexes. [8D]

                      http://www.steamlocomotive.com/streamlined/scrapped/
                      1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                      1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                      1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                      1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for the corrrection. I had just been to the Loewy Gallery and saw the Pennsylvania Railroad items, and got confused.

                        I am always amaized at the knowledge on this forum. I don't think there is any subject that someone doesn't know about! [:I]

                        Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for the corrrection. I had just been to the Loewy Gallery and saw the Pennsylvania Railroad items, and got confused.

                          I am always amaized at the knowledge on this forum. I don't think there is any subject that someone doesn't know about! [:I]

                          Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The RHD touring is much earlier than 1920, probably about 1913.

                            Terry

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The RHD touring is much earlier than 1920, probably about 1913.

                              Terry

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X