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Why is 1950 front suspension unique?

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  • Why is 1950 front suspension unique?

    I understand that the A arm front suspension and steering mechanism on 1950 Champions is unique to that year. Does anyone know why? Were there problems or deficiencies with it, aside from the Ross steering boxes that are comon through several years and models? What are the advantages or disadvantages of this set-up versus post-1950, aside from scarcity of parts? This is something that I have wondered about for several months now. I would appreciate any education I can get on this topic.

    1950 Champion
    W-3 4 Dr. Sedan
    Holdrege NE
    John
    1950 Champion
    W-3 4 Dr. Sedan
    Holdrege NE

  • #2
    The 51 and later arrangement is alot simpler that what they used in 1950. 1950 was vastly different from earlier as well. With the debut of the new V8 at hand (in '51), there may have been enough difference in the frame planform that they decided they'd revise the suspension/steering and simplify it as they did so.
    AMC also continued with their rather complex and goofy front end right thru '66 on the bigger cars and to '69 on the American. After those dates, they went with ball joints. The Ramblers had trouble with trunnion failures - especially as the cars got some years on them. It wasn't pretty when one laid down on a front wheel[xx(]


    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1963 Cruiser
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President two door

    No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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    • #3
      I have a '50 and have wondered the same thing. They made more '50 Studebakers than any year EVER, before or after! Why the change.[?]


      Dick
      Mountain Home, AR
      http://www.livingintheozarks.com/studebaker.htm

      Dick
      Mountain Home, AR
      http://www.livingintheozarks.com/studebaker2.htm

      Comment


      • #4
        Biggs
        So you're saying the change in suspension design for 1951 was a matter of simplification for production efficiency, not any real weakness in the 1950 design?

        1950 Champion
        W-3 4 Dr. Sedan
        Holdrege NE
        John
        1950 Champion
        W-3 4 Dr. Sedan
        Holdrege NE

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        • #5
          What is a trunnion?

          Comment


          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by 14x7

            What is a trunnion?
            It actually is the OUTER upper and lower "A" arm "PINS" or bushing & pin combination. But in this sense it is also including the King Pin suspension vs ball joint.

            I think the '50 setup was a sorta OK, stop gap setup until time could be had to "do it right"! If you want to know how I [u]really</u> feel! That dual rubber bushed idler arm affair at the pitman arm on Champions was the WORST!

            My Dad's '48 Champion I drove in High School, had a HALF turn slop in the wheel, until I replaced those rubber bushings! [xx(]

            StudeRich
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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            • #7
              "A trunnion is an imaginary creature that is the offspring of a troll and a crumudgeon; usually found living under bridges." I've often wondered about the fifty front suspensions and if a later frame could be a bolt in.

              Comment


              • #8
                I never knew the real reason for the change either. I know it is the first year for the non planer suspension ( for those that do not know, planer used what looks like a leaf spring as the front suspension). It is wierd the way Studebaker always tried to reuse parts from car to car but in 1950 the a-arms and king pins for the commander are different from those for the champion. The bell crank is also unique to 1950. In 1951 they used one set of a-arms for all models and used those with minor changes till the end. 1950 was the first year for coil springs in the front.

                Milt

                1947 Champion (owned since 1967)
                1961 Hawk
                1964 Convertable
                1967 Avanti
                1961 Lark 2 door
                1950 Commander Starlight

                Milt

                1947 Champion (owned since 1967)
                1961 Hawk 4-speed
                1967 Avanti
                1961 Lark 2 door
                1988 Avanti Convertible

                Member of SDC since 1973

                Comment


                • #9
                  I thought a "trunion" was a cross between an onion and a truffle! delicious. Shows ya what I know!
                  The 50 tie-rod ends have a different taper than the later (51 -).
                  Also the commanders had the lever-action shocks built into the upper control arm.

                  Bez Auto Alchemy
                  573-242-3530

                  http://auto-alchemy.com
                  http://bez-auto-alchemy.blogspot.com
                  Bez Auto Alchemy
                  573-318-8948
                  http://bezautoalchemy.com


                  "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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                  • #10
                    Shameless bump

                    1950 Champion
                    W-3 4 Dr. Sedan
                    Holdrege NE
                    John
                    1950 Champion
                    W-3 4 Dr. Sedan
                    Holdrege NE

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      OK, it is only unique because it is nowhere close to the '49 front end, and a lot different than the '51! It was a transition year from front leaf springs to coil springs, and the '50 Champion and the '50 Commander are both common to ONLY themselves!

                      The '51 is the "improved" coil spring suspension version, and with different springs and stabilizer bars for 6's and 8's worked very well to the end in 1966. [^]

                      I do not know how to describe "UNIQUE" any better than that, sorry. [:0]

                      If you like the styling and the way it drives and like the car, just enjoy it and don't worry about it!

                      We all have our preferences, for me it's '54 to '64 V-8's...ALL of them!
                      I've owned and driven almost all years and models of post-war Studebakers, some when new, and I know exactly what I like. []

                      StudeRich
                      StudeRich
                      Second Generation Stude Driver,
                      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        In my experience working with engineers, it's not at all uncommon to design a mechanical solution that seems right, only to get it into production and realize that you over-engineered it, and so the next iteration is a simplified version of the original.

                        I'd be willing to bet that's what happened here with Studebaker.


                        [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

                        Clark in San Diego
                        '63 F2/Lark Standard
                        http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
                        www.studebakersandiego.com

                        Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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