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SHOULD YOU GIVE A RESTORER A DEADLINE

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  • SHOULD YOU GIVE A RESTORER A DEADLINE

    Someone posted on the 56J Yahoo group about giving a restorer a deadline. I am sure the statement was in jest. However, should you demand, a car be restored by a specific date? Is it wise?

    BG

    SAVE THE STUDEBAKER.....SAVE THE WORLD.

  • #2
    I say absolutely-set a deadline.It will be better for the customer AND the shop..
    Too many 'no-hurry' jobs get treated just that way-no hurry. When that old car lying in the corner has been there for a year or so,the shop owner starts thinking about how much time he doesn't have for that car....
    BTDT. but what the heck,we can always start to finish that car TOMORROW..

    LaSalle,Il
    61Hawk
    Oglesby,Il.

    Comment


    • #3
      I say absolutely-set a deadline.It will be better for the customer AND the shop..
      Too many 'no-hurry' jobs get treated just that way-no hurry. When that old car lying in the corner has been there for a year or so,the shop owner starts thinking about how much time he doesn't have for that car....
      BTDT. but what the heck,we can always start to finish that car TOMORROW..

      LaSalle,Il
      61Hawk
      Oglesby,Il.

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't think that is possible in most cases. Before the car is disassembled, it is impossible to know what parts will be required to restore it. Once an inventory of needed parts is made, he would have to begin the search for parts - some of which will be rare and will require an open-ended search. In some cases, no quantity of money will help, for example if the required part doesn't exist. It may have to be made, on the schedule of another specialty shop. Body work, frame straightening, chrome, interior, glass, paint, mechanicals - rare is the shop that can do all of it, and your restorer cannot be held responsible for subcontracted time schedules. This is not to say that you shouldn't keep your eye on the shop and check in on the work frequently, but the setting of deadlines would be counterproductive.

        Comment


        • #5
          I don't think that is possible in most cases. Before the car is disassembled, it is impossible to know what parts will be required to restore it. Once an inventory of needed parts is made, he would have to begin the search for parts - some of which will be rare and will require an open-ended search. In some cases, no quantity of money will help, for example if the required part doesn't exist. It may have to be made, on the schedule of another specialty shop. Body work, frame straightening, chrome, interior, glass, paint, mechanicals - rare is the shop that can do all of it, and your restorer cannot be held responsible for subcontracted time schedules. This is not to say that you shouldn't keep your eye on the shop and check in on the work frequently, but the setting of deadlines would be counterproductive.

          Comment


          • #6
            In that case, I think a responsible shop would be glad to work out a calendar of benchmarks, so that even if the process is long, it is treated as a manageable process with realistic goals. Being able to meet benchmarks would also give the car owner some gauge by which to measure the performance of the shop.
            "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

            Comment


            • #7
              In that case, I think a responsible shop would be glad to work out a calendar of benchmarks, so that even if the process is long, it is treated as a manageable process with realistic goals. Being able to meet benchmarks would also give the car owner some gauge by which to measure the performance of the shop.
              "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

              Comment


              • #8
                I don't agree with unreasonable deadlines, nor do I agree with cars sitting with little or no work done for months or years. I've seen too many cars left in little boxes for years. The shop folds up and leaves you high and dry. or you recover the bits and pieces and start over. I just agreed to help in a lawsuit against a restoration shop that took apart a high dollar Starliner and lost or damaged all the parts over a period of a few years. The shop was a distance away from the owner and by the time he made the trip down to see what the heck was going on, it was too late.


                64 Commander 2 dr.
                63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk (Black) #2
                63 Avanti R1
                63 Daytona convert
                63 Lark 2 door
                63 Lark 2 door #2
                62 Daytona HT/ 4 speed
                62 Lark 2 door
                62 GT Hawk 4 speed
                60 Lark HT
                60 Hawk
                59 3E truck
                52 Starliner
                51 Commander

                JDP Maryland

                Comment


                • #9
                  I don't agree with unreasonable deadlines, nor do I agree with cars sitting with little or no work done for months or years. I've seen too many cars left in little boxes for years. The shop folds up and leaves you high and dry. or you recover the bits and pieces and start over. I just agreed to help in a lawsuit against a restoration shop that took apart a high dollar Starliner and lost or damaged all the parts over a period of a few years. The shop was a distance away from the owner and by the time he made the trip down to see what the heck was going on, it was too late.


                  64 Commander 2 dr.
                  63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk (Black) #2
                  63 Avanti R1
                  63 Daytona convert
                  63 Lark 2 door
                  63 Lark 2 door #2
                  62 Daytona HT/ 4 speed
                  62 Lark 2 door
                  62 GT Hawk 4 speed
                  60 Lark HT
                  60 Hawk
                  59 3E truck
                  52 Starliner
                  51 Commander

                  JDP Maryland

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    JP,exactly the point..Whacker,you mention things that are to be figured into the price and time allotment before the job is begun.

                    LaSalle,Il
                    61Hawk
                    Oglesby,Il.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      JP,exactly the point..Whacker,you mention things that are to be figured into the price and time allotment before the job is begun.

                      LaSalle,Il
                      61Hawk
                      Oglesby,Il.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Never say, "When you get the time" or "When you have nothing else to do." By the same token, don't demand a completion date.

                        Before consigning, discuss the whole project, ask questions, be certain the shop owner understands your expectations. What will be the logical progression of the work and what timeline can you expect for each progressive stage. Certainly get commitment for an approximate completion date but don't write it in stone.

                        Do not neglect to visit, or have a representative, on at least a monthly schedule. The anticipation of your arrival will assure something will be done and, use the opportunity to establish the goals before your next visit.

                        If you are pleased with the progress, do not hesitate to keep your account paid in full. If you have preferences for the subcontracting of wire harness, upholstery, chrome, etc. be certain these items are completed and available when required. He is providing a service but is also storing your vehicle if he can't proceed because he's waiting for something from you.

                        A complete restoration is a commitment that should not be undertaken lightly or without the financial foundation to see it through.

                        Brad Johnson
                        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                        33 Rockne 10
                        51 commander Starlight
                        53 Commander Starlight
                        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                        sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Never say, "When you get the time" or "When you have nothing else to do." By the same token, don't demand a completion date.

                          Before consigning, discuss the whole project, ask questions, be certain the shop owner understands your expectations. What will be the logical progression of the work and what timeline can you expect for each progressive stage. Certainly get commitment for an approximate completion date but don't write it in stone.

                          Do not neglect to visit, or have a representative, on at least a monthly schedule. The anticipation of your arrival will assure something will be done and, use the opportunity to establish the goals before your next visit.

                          If you are pleased with the progress, do not hesitate to keep your account paid in full. If you have preferences for the subcontracting of wire harness, upholstery, chrome, etc. be certain these items are completed and available when required. He is providing a service but is also storing your vehicle if he can't proceed because he's waiting for something from you.

                          A complete restoration is a commitment that should not be undertaken lightly or without the financial foundation to see it through.

                          Brad Johnson
                          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                          33 Rockne 10
                          51 commander Starlight
                          53 Commander Starlight
                          "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                          Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                          sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Having a shop also I like to show progress and not have a deadline. It is always easy to get in hurry and miss something because of a deadline. But if you continue to show the customer progress they are more understanding if something does happen to slow up the completeion. Also customers need to understand the easiest way to get a shop to stop working on your car is not to pay as work is being completed. I have seen many a car come to a complete stand still because no progress payments are being made and the body shop has to move on to get money to pay the bills. I always like to have the customer come in every two weeks and pay for the parts and labor that has been done on the car. Also this makes it easier for both the customer and body shop to end the restoration if there is a disagreement. Neither party is holding the other hostage.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Having a shop also I like to show progress and not have a deadline. It is always easy to get in hurry and miss something because of a deadline. But if you continue to show the customer progress they are more understanding if something does happen to slow up the completeion. Also customers need to understand the easiest way to get a shop to stop working on your car is not to pay as work is being completed. I have seen many a car come to a complete stand still because no progress payments are being made and the body shop has to move on to get money to pay the bills. I always like to have the customer come in every two weeks and pay for the parts and labor that has been done on the car. Also this makes it easier for both the customer and body shop to end the restoration if there is a disagreement. Neither party is holding the other hostage.

                              Comment

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