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Supplimental Eye Candy for Monday

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  • Supplimental Eye Candy for Monday





    Photo sent to me by a Hudson Jet owner,

    Husband of Lark VIII Girl

  • #2
    Thats different! Cool!

    Chris Dresbach
    Chris Dresbach

    Comment


    • #3
      So does anyone know the owner and where this car is from?

      Husband of Lark VIII girl

      Comment


      • #4
        I had a 56 F**d 3/4 cam two four bareles, continentil kit, long cruiser skirts.Under the back
        bumper were 2 blue lights.When i drove at night the cops stoped me all the time,i had to get out
        take the blue lens off,the next day i would put them back.I got tired of this after awhile
        &put red lenes on.

        Lenny
        Atlanta Ga.

        Comment


        • #5
          Studedude,

          Thanks for the history lesson. I dig obscure information like that. LH

          Straight from the horse's mouth

          Comment


          • #6
            To expand on the lights, Funeral Coaches of old had purple lights.

            Thanks for the "enlightenment" on lens colors.

            Those Dodge police cars were impressive , we had Dodge city cars of the that era. Indiana State police also drove Dodge for a few years then went to Mercury and Chrysler in the 1970s.

            I have seen Indiana state police pictues of Studebaker but do not remember seeing them in service. Does anyone in Indiana Studedom remember the Studebaker patrol cars of the ISP.?

            husband of Lark VIII girl

            Comment


            • #7
              Let me throw a cruve and ask.

              Where do/does the "blue light" permit fit in, when it pertains to Volunteer Fireman?

              Usually a 360 visable blue light used for emergency.....when permitted on private vehicles.

              More comon in rural areas with fire departments without full time staff.

              ChopStu

              132 weeks till completion.
              61 Lark

              sigpic

              Comment


              • #8
                I love this photo and am waiting for the story on the 440's. Police cars sure have gone down hill IMHO.
                When I was working at the local conoco station at 16yrs of age late 70's a local had a FBI unmarked unit he got at auction. He would bring it to the station for service, all the service station owner would let me do was drive it from the service bay back to the front. Man did I want to test drive that car. Had a special data plate on the radiator crossbrace stating something about FBI or special use. Had a hemi tranny as I recall and set up high and stiff. Lets hear the 440 story.

                [quote]quote:Originally posted by Studedude

                quote:Originally posted by Chris_Dresbach

                Thats different! Cool!
                Chris is right... it is both different, and cool!

                It appears to be a fire department car... no less than 21 years older than I remember seeing blue lights on an emergency vehicle...

                I never knew of blue lights on emergency vehicles existing until the early 70's, when a then new concept ordained that blue lights were supposed to represent police, red was to represent fire and ambulance, and amber, wreckers, highway department vehicles, etc. I thought, and still think, the concept made/makes sense.

                All of that seems to have fallen by the wayside over the years. Still today, (in Oklahoma) police use red, blue, and amber. Fire/ambulance still use primarily red, and wreckers and highway department vehicles seem to be allowed to use whatever the heck they want to.

                The first time I got into "trouble" with my "superiors" on the P.D. was when our progressive... (and I say that with the utmost respect) chief decided to put blue lights on our patrol cars. (1971) He also ordered blue/white patrol cars, because blue was supposed to represent police, by golly!:

                I'm standing by the third blue and white from the left.
                (They were 440s, but that's another story. [8D][][^])

                The chief was on the right track... the concept simply never "took hold," at least not in Oklahoma. I think southern states might have adopted the blue for police lights? [?][?]

                The bad news here, back then, was that our law makers had not at that time (and have not yet, to this day) designated blue lights as police only.

                The law in Oklahoma back then (and to this day) required(s) a flashing red light to be displayed on a police car in emergency situations. If such a (red) light was/is not displayed, then a violator really had/has no obligation to stop.

                The good news was that the department was unable to purchase enough blue lenses to go around to all of the squad cars on line at the time. So, they put all blue lenses on some units, and all red on others. (Units with red lens not pictured.) [:0]

                Knowing that the law required red lights for police cars, I would swap one blue lens for one red lens from another unit, so that both units displayed one lens of each color.

                I liked that combination, because it seemed that the blue lens showed up better at night, while the red lens kept us "legal."

                The Chief did not see it that way. He wanted all blues, and myself and my co-conspirators were identified, and set straight.

                The D.A. and courts agreed with me... a red light was required for LE use, in spite of what the progressive chief thought... he was ahead of his time, and was set straight. As a result, charges were dropped for violators that had run from the police.

                So, to this day, here in Oklahoma, red/blue/amber represents police, red ambulance/fire, and wreckers are allowed to flash what ever colors trip their trigger, because they managed to convince the law makers that drivers just don't pay any attention to amber.

                [im

                Russ Shop Foreman \"Rusty Nut Garage\"
                53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
                57 SH (project)
                60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

                Comment


                • #9
                  LOVE those old Mopar cop cars... the baddest ever![8D]

                  I've heard a lot about Chevy's new purpose-built police cars. Hope they're as awesome as those old Dodges... then I'll return to my old fun of buying surplus police cars at auction just to drive them for a while...

                  Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
                  Parish, central NY 13131

                  GOD BLESS AMERICA





                  Comment


                  • #10
                    When I was born, my Dad worked for Gulf Oil Co. and we lived in a Gulf employee camp in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. Plaquemines Parish is basically the land that surrounds the Mississippi river at the toe of the boot that makes up the shape of Louisiana, the parish has one north-south highway LA Hwy 23 that runs the 90 miles from New Orleans down the river to the mouth of the river. The parish for all practical purposes back then was a dictatorship run by Judge Leander Perez. Anyway my Dad has told me that the Parish sheriff had a brand new 1957 supercharged Studebaker Golden Hawk and there was absolutely no one who could out run him. Dad said everyone in the parish talked about how fast it was, but unfortunately the sheriff didn't have it long as he drove it so fast and so hard all the time that he burnt up the engine.

                    Here in Oklahoma the Hwy Patrol have the new Dodge Chargers, they may not be the Dodge of your day Dave but they sure look better and more intimidating than the Crown Vics.

                    <div align="left">John</div id="left">

                    <div align="left">'63 Avanti, R1, Auto, AC, PW (under restoration)</div id="left">
                    sigpic
                    John
                    63R-2386
                    Resto-Mod by Michael Myer

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Husband of Lark VIII girl. The '50 belongs to long time Indy Chapter members Dave & Diane Elmore. They reside just west of Indianapolis in Avon, Indiana. This is one of aleast three Studebakers they own. Dave use to be a volunteer fireman and at one time had two fire trucks.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        440! 440![]

                        [quote]quote:Originally posted by rusty nut garage

                        I love this photo and am waiting for the story on the 440's. Police cars sure have gone down hill IMHO.
                        When I was working at the local conoco station at 16yrs of age late 70's a local had a FBI unmarked unit he got at auction. He would bring it to the station for service, all the service station owner would let me do was drive it from the service bay back to the front. Man did I want to test drive that car. Had a special data plate on the radiator crossbrace stating something about FBI or special use. Had a hemi tranny as I recall and set up high and stiff. Lets hear the 440 story.

                        [quote]quote:Originally posted by Studedude

                        quote:Originally posted by Chris_Dresbach

                        Thats different! Cool!
                        Chris is right... it is both different, and cool!

                        It appears to be a fire department car... no less than 21 years older than I remember seeing blue lights on an emergency vehicle...

                        I never knew of blue lights on emergency vehicles existing until the early 70's, when a then new concept ordained that blue lights were supposed to represent police, red was to represent fire and ambulance, and amber, wreckers, highway department vehicles, etc. I thought, and still think, the concept made/makes sense.

                        All of that seems to have fallen by the wayside over the years. Still today, (in Oklahoma) police use red, blue, and amber. Fire/ambulance still use primarily red, and wreckers and highway department vehicles seem to be allowed to use whatever the heck they want to.

                        The first time I got into "trouble" with my "superiors" on the P.D. was when our progressive... (and I say that with the utmost respect) chief decided to put blue lights on our patrol cars. (1971) He also ordered blue/white patrol cars, because blue was supposed to represent police, by golly!:

                        I'm standing by the third blue and white from the left.
                        (They were 440s, but that's another story. [8D][][^])

                        The chief was on the right track... the concept simply never "took hold," at least not in Oklahoma. I think southern states might have adopted the blue for police lights? [?][?]

                        The bad news here, back then, was that our law makers had not at that time (and have not yet, to this day) designated blue lights as police only.

                        The law in Oklahoma back then (and to this day) required(s) a flashing red light to be displayed on a police car in emergency situations. If such a (red) light was/is not displayed, then a violator really had/has no obligation to stop.

                        The good news was that the department was unable to purchase enough blue lenses to go around to all of the squad cars on line at the time. So, they put all blue lenses on some units, and all red on others. (Units with red lens not pictured.) [:0]

                        Knowing that the law required red lights for police cars, I would swap one blue lens for one red lens from another unit, so that both units displayed one lens of each color.

                        I liked that combination, because it seemed that the blue lens showed up better at night, while the red lens kept us "legal."

                        The Chief did not see it that way. He wanted all blues, and myself and my co-conspirators were identified, and set straight.

                        The D.A. and courts agreed with me... a red light was required for LE use, in spite of what the progressive chief thought... he was ahead of his time, and was set straight. As a result, charges were dropped for violators that had run from the police.

                        So, to this day, here in Oklahoma, red/blu

                        Comment

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