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  • Stuck engine remedy

    I see an ad in Hemmings Classic Car for a product called Engine Release that is supposed to be the go to product for freeing stuck engines. It was developed by NATO! Anyone have any experience with this product?

    Don Wilson
    53 Commander Hardtop
    64 Champ 1/2 ton
    Centralia, WA
    Don Wilson, Centralia, WA

    40 Champion 4 door*
    50 Champion 2 door*
    53 Commander K Auto*
    53 Commander K overdrive*
    55 President Speedster
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    64 Champ 1/2 ton

    * Formerly owned

  • #2
    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...engine,release
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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    • #3
      Hey, Don, a little personal experience story here. I had a one owner 57 President sedan that was low miles, stored for LOTS of years that I and the following 3 owners never did get unstuck. None of us looked inside the engine, tho, may have been something broke and lodged. Just last month I got a flathead V8 of brand X persuasion with about the same story, and after using acetone/ATF mixture as suggested in Turning Wheels, it was starting and running in less than a week. That formula was later amended in a "correction" to acetone and something else by TW, but the previous owner of the flathead had no luck with his solutions/methods, and I had a running engine !! An old A-model guy (91 yrs) told me he liked engines that were stuck, meant they had round cylinders-kinda makes sense I guess, at least it was an entertaining and different perspective, but you may or may not have a smoker when you get it loose apparently. Good luck- -long live acetone and ATF 50/50 mixture at my house, John

      Comment


      • #4
        I remember reading the article that compared the acetone/ATF mixture to WD-40 and other popular spray cans of magic, and the 50/50 mixture was ranked #1 for busting rusted nuts/bolts loose. However, I am curious what it is about these two derivitives of petroleum that apparently dissolves rust. Any ideas? Does ATF contain a chemical that dissolves rust and the acetone simply makes the ATF thin enough to seep into the minute crevices? Years ago I heard guys talk about using Coca-Cola for this purpose as the acid would dissolve the rust. Makes me wonder if vinegar would work or if Iron-Out or Lime-Away would have similar results being that they remove rust stains (although I realize they wouldn't offer lubrication). Anybody out there use home-made or household products for busting engines loose?


        Brent's rootbeer racer.
        MN iron ore...it does your body good.
        sigpic
        In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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        • #5
          Once a few years back, we restored an old JD tractor that had ceased pistons. Took off the head and filled the cylinders with coke and let it sit for about two weeks. I dont know if it just needed some fluid poured in or what, but it loosened up.[?][?][?]

          Chris Dresbach
          Chris Dresbach

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          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by Milaca

            I remember reading the article that compared the acetone/ATF mixture to WD-40 and other popular spray cans of magic, and the 50/50 mixture was ranked #1 for busting rusted nuts/bolts loose. However, I am curious what it is about these two derivitives of petroleum that apparently dissolves rust. Any ideas? Does ATF contain a chemical that dissolves rust and the acetone simply makes the ATF thin enough to seep into the minute crevices? Years ago I heard guys talk about using Coca-Cola for this purpose as the acid would dissolve the rust. Makes me wonder if vinegar would work or if Iron-Out or Lime-Away would have similar results being that they remove rust stains (although I realize they wouldn't offer lubrication). Anybody out there use home-made or household products for busting engines loose?


            Brent's rootbeer racer.
            MN iron ore...it does your body good.
            The problem comes when the aluminum pistons oxidize and bond to the rings and cast iron walls. That happens in the presence of any moisture and even if you free it up, it's unlikely to run strong. Also, the acid in the oil attacks the bearings, so he have to be very lucky to end up with a good engine.

            JDP/Maryland
            JDP Maryland

            Comment


            • #7
              quote:Originally posted by Chris_Dresbach

              Once a few years back, we restored an old JD tractor that had ceased pistons. Took off the head and filled the cylinders with coke and let it sit for about two weeks. I dont know if it just needed some fluid poured in or what, but it loosened up.[?][?][?]

              Chris Dresbach
              Maybe the caffiene in the Coke woke the engine up?


              Brent's rootbeer racer.
              MN iron ore...it does your body good.
              sigpic
              In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

              Comment


              • #8
                Some years back we used Sloans Liniment,you could buy it at any drug store cheap, my grand dad had it around mostley to rub down his horses after a hard days work but sure worked good on stuck engines. MAC

                Comment


                • #9
                  The active ingrediant in coke regards rust is Phosphoric acid. There is/was a product called "oxysolv" that is basically diluted phosphoric acid along with some other stuff, maybe a little zinc. I remember paying about $25 for a gallon it it in the 90s.

                  What I use now is milking machine cleaner. About 50% phosphoric acid with detergent. Dilute or use full strength. Much stronger than oxysolv and usually about $10 a gallon. Caution in order (and rubber gloves) as it will dissolve stuff completely if strong dilutions are left soaking too long. Lost some washers that way when I forgot them overnight Works well to really clean and derust small parts just before zinc plating them.

                  The only time I tried and unstuck a engine was with filling the cylinders with ATF and letting soak over the winter. Got the pistons loose but didn't do much for the valves and that led to bent pushrods.

                  ATF has a lot of detergent it is and its pretty thin and "creepy" already, my guess is the acetone makes it even more so and helps it soak in more. Also it evaporates pretty quickly leaving the oil behind. Just a guess on why it helps out the pure ATF.

                  Jeff in ND

                  '53 Champion Hardtop

                  Jeff in ND

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                  • #10
                    Jeff, is 'milking machine cleaner' the actual description on the jug? Is this stuff found at creameries or farm supply stores? I suppose once the pistons are freed, one must tip the car upside down and refill with this solution. When rusty parts are dipped in or coated with this stuff, do you have to rinse it off with water when the rust is gone (like you have to do with Naval Jelly)?


                    Brent's rootbeer racer.
                    MN iron ore...it does your body good.
                    sigpic
                    In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      ASE certified mech here with my 2 cents, it's one thing to "free up" a siezed engine but don't expect it to be a decent runner. the chances are the oxidation has damaged the cyl. walls and compresion rings. The oil rings also need to be free of oxidation and carbon. Many times I find that a "siezure" is caused by an internal coolant leek such as a head gasket. However you will still need to free up the engine for disassembly.

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                      • #12
                        I suppose there is a chance of breaking a piston ring or two when breaking them free also, thus possibly scoring the cylinder walls once the engine begins running? Slighty off topic now, but I had a 4 cylinder powered Minneapolis-Moline model R tractor that I bought as junk being the guy told me that the engine was 'blown'. With a hand crank, I could rotate the engine back and forth at least 3/4 of a revolution. I took the head off and found that one cylinder was packed with acorns! A chipmunk apparently went down the exhaust pipe and stored its stash of winter food which fell through the exhaust valve. With a little more labor, I got the $75 dollar tractor running. [8D] The funnest thing about old 'junk' is getting it for cheap and then getting it running for the first time in many years. It may not run great, but that doesnt take away from the fun and excitement of hearing it run. "It's alive!" [8D]


                        Brent's rootbeer racer.
                        MN iron ore...it does your body good.
                        sigpic
                        In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Brent,

                          The milking machine cleaner I use I get at the local Mills Fleet Farm. Any place selling dairy and livestock supply should have it. Its not shown on the Mills FF website (site stinks IMO). There are a couple different grades of it depending on the intended application. I get the stuff with the strongest acid % as they are all the same price. I can dilute as needed. Its sometimes called "Stone-solv" or "acid rinse", etc. Don't know if there is a more generic term since milking machine cleaner is what I call it. Used to clean out the equipment (hoses, valves, etc) that gets buildup of calcium deposite as well as general cleaning/disinfect. Its got some detergent in it as well as the phosphoric acid. Removes grease and rust with some scrubbing! I'd forgotten about the stuff until I found it while detouring through the livestock supply area a few years ago. My Dad milked cows up to '83 and the milker had to be disassembled and cleaned out with likely a similar product every few months. I remember my mother doing that in the bathtub [:0]

                          Jeff in ND

                          '53 Champion Hardtop

                          Jeff in ND

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                          • #14
                            I learned a trick from a guy who was so ancient, he still drove his 1923 model A every day, and this was just a few years ago, he wasn't ready to trade it in for a newer model... Anyways, he introduced me to citric acid. You can buy it in a big jug, its a white powder. You just mix it with water, and put parts in it. you could buy a rubbermaid tub, fill it with water/citric acid, and soak the whole engine in there. This old timer would soak entire model A engines and transmissions in 55 gallon drums. The great thing about the citric acid is that it doesn't react with the metal, only the rust. You could leave the parts in there for a month and it wont damage them. It does however dissolve 100% of the rust. I have been using this trick since he showed me and it works every time. The old timer also had a kiddie pool that he would soak body panels in, and the metal comes out looking brand new, which is a heck of a feat for 80-90 year old metal and rust!

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                            • #15
                              So where can one purchase citric acis?

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