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Possible 1951 Export Business Coupe?

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  • Possible 1951 Export Business Coupe?

    I have a 1951 Business Coupe with no running gear that my Brother and I bought in Columbus, New Mexico USA around 1975-76. The car was in a junk yard about 1/4 mile from the Mexican Border. We loaded the car on the trailor and headed down the highway where the DEA swooped down on us in unmarked vehicles and searched the Studebaker, but thats another story. The car is a base model, the body tag is 9G 04 565. It was painted yellow and all four fenders are painted black, it looks like there was a shield of some kind on both doors (possible Mexican Police?) The car is really bare bones, no heater, overdrive or radio. Speedometer and fuel gauge only, wipers and no external chrome trim. There is a tag on the drivers door post that has the serial number G11410, Studebaker South bend and everything else is in spanish (Hencho en ... etc.). I was wondering if this was an export model or just refitted by the US dealer, possibly in El Paso Texas (I went to an auction in El Paso about 10 years ago and there was 20-30 NOS Studebaker metric instrument clusters there).

  • #2
    I havent been able to break all of the code down but the 9G part was very easy, its a 1950 not a 1951. I will continue working on it, but I'm sure someone else has more books on the codes than I do.

    Randy_G
    www.AutomotiveHistoryOnline.com

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    • #3
      I havent been able to break all of the code down but the 9G part was very easy, its a 1950 not a 1951. I will continue working on it, but I'm sure someone else has more books on the codes than I do.

      Randy_G
      www.AutomotiveHistoryOnline.com

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:The car is a base model, the body tag is 9G 04 565.
        The body tag probably says:

        9G Q4 565

        Q was the body symbol for a business ( 3 passenger ) coupe

        And Randy is right. It is a 1950 Champion business coupe

        The serial number is strange, though. According to the book I am looking at, 1950 Champion serial numbers started at G-468,101 for South Bend produced cars.


        Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

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        • #5
          quote:The car is a base model, the body tag is 9G 04 565.
          The body tag probably says:

          9G Q4 565

          Q was the body symbol for a business ( 3 passenger ) coupe

          And Randy is right. It is a 1950 Champion business coupe

          The serial number is strange, though. According to the book I am looking at, 1950 Champion serial numbers started at G-468,101 for South Bend produced cars.


          Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

          Comment


          • #6
            I apologize, I knew this was a 1950. I bought a 51 four door champ for running gear. I wrote this post and somehow got it in the technical section, canceled it and rewrote it here and as usual messed it up.

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            • #7
              I apologize, I knew this was a 1950. I bought a 51 four door champ for running gear. I wrote this post and somehow got it in the technical section, canceled it and rewrote it here and as usual messed it up.

              Comment


              • #8
                YES! Quite likely it was final assembled in Mexico! Pretty neat, I think. The Q4 was the "Custom" trim level - meaning bare bones brightwork as well as other things.
                Richard Quinn mentions the Mexican Studebaker plant(s) in the May '92 Almanac. While a plant was in operation as early as 1939, it would have closed with the start of WWII.
                After the war, it was some time before any Studes were alloted to overseas assy plants (the plants were privately owned after all)and the article indicates that the later Mexican plant (in Tlalnepantla - a suburb of Mexico City) started producing cars as early as 1950, if not before that.
                A copy of the production order for this car would probably reflect it's being sent in CKD condition, for ultimate assembly in Mexico.

                Miscreant adrift in
                the BerStuda Triangle


                1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                1960 Larkvertible V8
                1958 Provincial wagon
                1953 Commander coupe

                No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                Comment


                • #9
                  YES! Quite likely it was final assembled in Mexico! Pretty neat, I think. The Q4 was the "Custom" trim level - meaning bare bones brightwork as well as other things.
                  Richard Quinn mentions the Mexican Studebaker plant(s) in the May '92 Almanac. While a plant was in operation as early as 1939, it would have closed with the start of WWII.
                  After the war, it was some time before any Studes were alloted to overseas assy plants (the plants were privately owned after all)and the article indicates that the later Mexican plant (in Tlalnepantla - a suburb of Mexico City) started producing cars as early as 1950, if not before that.
                  A copy of the production order for this car would probably reflect it's being sent in CKD condition, for ultimate assembly in Mexico.

                  Miscreant adrift in
                  the BerStuda Triangle


                  1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                  1960 Larkvertible V8
                  1958 Provincial wagon
                  1953 Commander coupe

                  No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    There was an assembly plant in Mexico (and many other countries around the world) at that time. It was a privately owned company that assembled the parts sent to them from South Bend. They may have had their own serial number range.

                    We're not called 'hillbillies' any more....now we're Ozark Americans!
                    Dwain G.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      There was an assembly plant in Mexico (and many other countries around the world) at that time. It was a privately owned company that assembled the parts sent to them from South Bend. They may have had their own serial number range.

                      We're not called 'hillbillies' any more....now we're Ozark Americans!
                      Dwain G.

                      Comment

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