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  • Herb Shriners 64 Avanti

    Just joined the club I have a 63/64 Avanti R4935 that belonged to the late TV host Herb Shriner. Supposedly he and his wife were killed in Fla. in this car. On the inside engine compartment on the wheel well is a tag that has the code RQ3564 does anyone know what this means. The car has round headlights and the exterior color was what the code on the bill of sale said it was (Avanti Red)and has been painted white. the interior is the red that the code also calls for. i have a letter that states the car was sold to Herb in 1963. This car is in great shape and the only thing changed on it was, the supercharger was taken off to accomodate the AC.
    I also could use an ignition switch with keys sinc I have missplaced (lost) the keys.

    Thanks in advance and look forward to hearing from you.

    Idahobob

  • #2
    Possibaly the number is off a donor car if parts were replaced after an accident.

    Look on the S.D.C. home page for links to vendors that have ignition switches or contact an old time locksmith th make another key.

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    • #3
      Get a production order from the Studebaker National Museum. Studebaker International should have the ignition switch w/keys.
      Turning Wheels, monthly magazine of the SDC wil have all the information you need to order the aformwentioned.

      Richard

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      • #4
        The RQ number is the body tag number the other is the serial number which can be found on a plate welded to the frame rail below the dip stick.

        Richard

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        • #5
          I got my production order from Nostalgic Motor Cars
          in Wixom, Michigan. Got it the same week I ordered
          it. Might take quite a bit longer from the Museum.

          Comment


          • #6
            It sound like the car was rebody'ed with a donor car body, of maybe even just had the serial tag moved to another car. As I recall, the car hit a tree very hard, killed both Herb and hos wife.

            JDP/Maryland
            JDP Maryland

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            • #7
              Mr Shriner and his wife were killed instantly April 23,
              1970 returning from an appearance in West Palm Beach when
              their Studebaker Avanti crashed into a palm tree.
              Brake failure was given as the cause.

              Mr Shriner owned about 2 dozen vintage automobiles at the time.

              Comment


              • #8
                R4935 is a 1964 Avanti that was built in August 1963 and should have square headlight bezels.
                The 3564 body number does not seem like it would be correct for that 4935 serial number.
                Did you check that 4935 is on the frame plate? If it is, you can get a build sheet for your Avanti from the SNM. This will not only give you the original body number, engine number, etc., but will give you the key numbers. If you have the original locks and ignition, a good locksmith can make replacement keys from the key code numbers.

                Gary L.
                Wappinger, NY

                SDC member since 1968
                Studebaker enthusiast much longer
                Gary L.
                Wappinger, NY

                SDC member since 1968
                Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by fstst56
                  Brake failure was given as the cause.
                  [:0][:0][:0][:0][:0]
                  Not a widespread problem I hope!

                  Seriously, I've never heard of a brake failure in an Avanti...any
                  one know more?

                  BTW: The best known car he had was the Phantom Corsair custom...

                  63 Avanti R1 2788
                  1914 Stutz Bearcat
                  (George Barris replica)

                  Washington State
                  63 Avanti R1 2788
                  1914 Stutz Bearcat
                  (George Barris replica)

                  Washington State

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Back in the 1980's the '63 R1 Avanti I owned suffered brake failure. I was lucky...it was very low speed and no traffic...I was able to let it drift into a parking space and stop against the curb with no damage. The problem was the master cylinder...rebuilt it and problem solved.

                    I sold the car several years later and was in contact with a subsequent owner to fill in some of the car's history for him. He told me had the car painted and when he brought it home, guess what? The brakes failed and he went into a tool bench in his garage and caused $1800 damage to the car! I don't know what the problem was that time but it looks like the car is keeping up its traditions.




                    Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.
                    Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My recollection is that Herb Shriner did a lot of his own car work and had worked on the brakes himself that day. "Brake failure" can mean a lot of different things, including failing to tighten the brake hoses sufficiently. Not trying to libel Mr Shriner, but that is how I remember the story.

                      Ernie Kovacs was another TV personality that also died in a car crash, though he was driving a Corvair. Kovacs was an inveterate cigar smoker, and it was supposed that he was trying to light a cigar when he missed a turn.

                      Skip Lackie
                      Washington DC
                      Skip Lackie

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I know I am veering off topic here, but I have heard this way too many times when a loss of brakes is concerned. "The pedal went to the floor, so I coasted for a quarter mile until I found a parked car to crash into." "I put it in neutral and rolled down from 60 MPH... I finally veered into a parking lot and slammed into a curb to stop." That is very scary to me. I cannot be the only one to have thought quickly enough to stab the parking brake pedal, gear down, do SOMETHING to slow the car down as quickly as possible. My closest call was my own fault... After driving a car (not an Avanti, though) with diminishing stoppers for about a year, the combined effects of a weak master cylinder, shoes way out of adjustment, and a leaky wheel cylinder, all conspired to leave me wildly pumping a limp brake pedal at 50 MPH with a fast approaching red light. The car ahead of me slammed on the brakes and stopped, so I had nowhere to go. I quickly shifted from 4th to 3rd to 2nd gear as I pulled the parking brake lever while holding the release button so I could modulate the rear brakes to keep them from locking up. This all happened very quickly, and I eeked to a stop with about 10 feet to spare before I really knew what was happening. I even limped the car 6 miles home using the same methods. No offense meant to anyone here, and I now return you to your regularly scheduled programming. LH

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          quote:Originally posted by Lark Hunter

                          I know I am veering off topic here, but I have heard this way too many times when a loss of brakes is concerned. "The pedal went to the floor, so I coasted for a quarter mile until I found a parked car to crash into." "I put it in neutral and rolled down from 60 MPH... I finally veered into a parking lot and slammed into a curb to stop." That is very scary to me. I cannot be the only one to have thought quickly enough to stab the parking brake pedal, gear down, do SOMETHING to slow the car down as quickly as possible. My closest call was my own fault... After driving a car (not an Avanti, though) with diminishing stoppers for about a year, the combined effects of a weak master cylinder, shoes way out of adjustment, and a leaky wheel cylinder, all conspired to leave me wildly pumping a limp brake pedal at 50 MPH with a fast approaching red light. The car ahead of me slammed on the brakes and stopped, so I had nowhere to go. I quickly shifted from 4th to 3rd to 2nd gear as I pulled the parking brake lever while holding the release button so I could modulate the rear brakes to keep them from locking up. This all happened very quickly, and I eeked to a stop with about 10 feet to spare before I really knew what was happening. I even limped the car 6 miles home using the same methods. No offense meant to anyone here, and I now return you to your regularly scheduled programming. LH
                          This could have been my story too except that mine is a little wilder.
                          In mid-'61 I was driving my Lark Cruiser to Providence (RI) from the Quonset Point area. I had five sailors in the car with me. I was crusing about 50 mph in the right lane of a very busy four-lane undivided highway. Suddenly the truck ahead of me cleared a large chunk of sheet metal. I couldn't clear it and I had no choice but to hit it (cars beside me in the left lane). The chunk bounced up, hit the left rear wheel cylinder squarely, pushing it in to the drum. Of course my brakes were then gone. I was going down a hill and there was a red light at the intersection at the bottom of the hill. I yanked on the parking brake, but it was also taken out by the collision. So, I dropped the Flight-O-Matic in to Low. That slowed me in Second until it dropped into First. I slowed more but was still rolling toward the stopped cars. I swerved on to the shoulder and dropped the tranny into Reverse- loud noise and lurch, but it stopped, engine still running (and the tranny still working). The sailors bailed out on me and hitched from there. I guess I called my wife collect from a pay phone (long before cell phones)and she called the dealer that serviced the car. They picked me up and took the car to their shop. I think they had to replace the brake line, the wheel cylinder, the backing plate and the drum, probably a $200 bill including the tow. With their help I was finally able to convince the insurance company that it was collision damage and they did pay the bill (less my deductible). I drove the car for three more years putting over 65,000 miles on it and the tranny never gave any problems.



                          Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia. '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Daytona convertible, '53 Commander Starliner, Museum R-4 engine, '62 Gravely Model L, '72 Gravely Model 430

                          Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                          '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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                          • #14
                            quote:Originally posted by Skip Lackie

                            My recollection is that Herb Shriner did a lot of his own car work and had worked on the brakes himself that day. "Brake failure" can mean a lot of different things, including failing to tighten the brake hoses sufficiently. Not trying to libel Mr Shriner, but that is how I remember the story....
                            That's the story I remember too. Maybe they weren't wearing seat belts or maybe he was going really fast. I remember seeing an Avanti in a wrecking year in California that had been in a head-on collision with a pickup truck. The driveline was pushed so hard that the rear wheels were cocked in from the differential being pushed back. Neither occupant of the Avanti received severe injuries, but the truck driver was killed.



                            Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia. '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Daytona convertible, '53 Commander Starliner, Museum R-4 engine, '62 Gravely Model L, '72 Gravely Model 430

                            Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                            '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Paul Johnson

                              quote:Neither occupant of the Avanti received severe injuries, but the truck driver was killed.
                              Apparently shattering fiberglass provides great energy adsorbtion

                              Bob

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