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Ever try brush painting your old stude?

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  • Ever try brush painting your old stude?

    If I would brush paint ,should I thin the paint down?

  • #2
    Search the forum for roller paints job, or google links like this.

    http://www.instructables.com/id/Pain...ith-Rustoleum/

    JDP/Maryland
    JDP Maryland

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    • #3
      quote:Originally posted by 14x7

      If I would brush paint ,should I thin the paint down?
      Painted many a claimer with a brush and a roller, but never a stude.

      But some rat/rust rods are painted with a roller. here's how.

      http://www.instructables.com/id/The-...-paint-your-c/

      You do know you just sent a massive shudder through the brain cells of the stude gurus don't you.

      Comment


      • #4
        I painted my 55 President with a roller, while I am not pleased, it is because of my choice of paint. The paint I used was RustOleum Painter's Touch Gloss. The problem I encountered was that it was too thin. I put eight coats on, it didn't build enough for me to wet sand it enough to get a flat surface, it appears etched, tiny pits.

        If I had a full bodied paint, it would have sanded well and would take a polish. Use automotive quality paint. Put it on heavy and wet sand, buff and polish it. I had zero runs, just too thin a paint. Check out the online resources, do what they say, it will work.

        [img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Avatar1.jpg[/img=left]
        Tom Bredehoft
        '53 Commander Coupe (since 1959)
        '55 President (6H Y6) State Sedan
        (Under Construction 617 hrs.)
        '05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
        All Indiana built cars

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        • #5
          When I was a kid in the late '50's, an elderly farmer who went to my church showed up in his A model ford sporting a new black paint job he had done with a brush. Looked great from about a quarter of a mile away!

          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
          SDC member since 1975
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

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          • #6
            You've got to be kidding! I read part of one of those "instructables" and just cringed. Might be a good process for a lot car or logging truck, but the thought of people thinking it's a viable way to make a car look well-repaired and lasting makes me [xx(]

            Brush paint if you like, but no way am I buying that it'll look decent, let alone good... brusher beware[B)]

            Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
            Parish, central NY 13131






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            • #7
              Just read an article in an older (06'?) issue of Hot Rod in which they used regular Rustoleum enamel to paint a falcon with a roller and foam brush. They declared it a cheap (under $100) but labor intensive way to get a decent paint job. Not "show" quality, but several notches above a typical cheapie spray job.


              Steve Hudson
              The Dalles, Oregon
              1949 "GMOBaker" 1-T Dually (workhorse)
              1953 Commander Convertible (show & go)
              1953 Champion Starliner (custom/rod project)
              1954 Champion Coupe (daily driver)
              1960 Hawk (future project?)

              Steve Hudson
              The Dalles, Oregon
              1949 \"GMOBaker\" 1-T Dually (workhorse)
              1953 Commander Convertible (show & go)
              1953 "Studacudallac" (project)

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              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by bams50

                You've got to be kidding! I read part of one of those "instructables" and just cringed. Might be a good process for a lot car or logging truck, but the thought of people thinking it's a viable way to make a car look well-repaired and lasting makes me [xx(]

                Brush paint if you like, but no way am I buying that it'll look decent, let alone good... brusher beware[B)]

                Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
                Parish, central NY 13131



                Take another look

                http://www.performanceforums.com/for...php?t=67200168


                JDP/Maryland
                JDP Maryland

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yes, but very little thinner, and i wouldnt use metalic paint, but you will have a LOT of color sanding to do if you want to get rid of the brush strokes. Try it on a seperate small panel first and let it dry completly then color sand and buff to see how much work your in for. I'd use a good quality brush also to keep the hair from falling out.

                  101st Airborne Div. 326 Engineers Ft Campbell Ky.

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                  • #10
                    Go ahead and try it.Read the tutorials listed above and give it a whirl.
                    SD2Steve's comment about it can be better than a cheapie spray job is on
                    the money.
                    Mono mind in a stereo world

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I hate to be discouraging, and I haven't seen the object/the car in question, but I think maybe you would be better off waiting until you have the opportunity to do things more in the ways of spray painting the car.
                      If you are building a hot rod, and you want a kind of rough finish, you could go for primer only, or a semi gloss solution.
                      IF this is a hot rod, you should build the car YOUR way, cause that's what hot rodding is all about.
                      Still, you don't want to use your money and a lot of working effort to kind of decrease the value of the car, would you..?
                      If you can't really afford the paint job now, focuse on other things the car may need for now:-)
                      Good luck!

                      "There are two speeds in life - flat out and faster"(Burt Munro)

                      1953 Starliner("hot rod" project)
                      1953 Regal Commander Starlight Coupe(original).



                      \"There are two speeds in life - flat out and faster\"(Burt Munro)

                      1953 Starliner(\"hot rod\" project)
                      1953 Regal Commander Starlight Coupe(original - SOLD...).
                      Proud member of SDC:-)






                      Kvinesdal, Norway(land of vikings and midnight sun) :-)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Here's two threads on the subject, with some pic's.

                        http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...s=roller,paint

                        http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...s=roller,paint



                        quote:Originally posted by 14x7

                        If I would brush paint ,should I thin the paint down?
                        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                        Jeff


                        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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                        • #13
                          All we're talking about here is an application method.

                          No matter what application method you use, most any problem can be corrected if you are willing to spend the time with wet sanding and recoating.

                          So if you are truely a CASO, then go for it.

                          For me, I'll take my Devilbuss PLUS gun. It's a one time purchase but it will lay a smooth film of automobile paint that requires minimal sanding and overspray is almost non-existant.

                          If you love to wet sand than use a brush or roller. If you like to do other things with your spare time buy a good gun and be done with it.

                          Bob


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                          • #14
                            To do a decent paint job requires many hours of labor and prep. If you then use Rust Oleum or some other general purpose enamel from the hardware store, and spend dozens of hours sanding and buffing, maybe you can make it look okay.

                            You'll also have a paint job which will never look as good as real automotive paint, and which will not last. It'll water spot, be damaged by tree sap and bird droppings, will scratch and chip easily.

                            If the object is to get a good job at the lowest cost, do all the prep and priming yourself, get it as near perfect as you can, and then take it to a pro to be sprayed. You can probably get some place like Earl Scheib to spray it for a couple hundred dollars, but YOU take them the paint. Their stock paint is garbage.

                            You can buy enough DuPont Nason, with reducer and hardener for about $200, and you'll have something which will look great and last.

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                            • #15
                              Earl Scheib or Maaco would be better. Will paint any car 249.00. Go to Big Lots and get some rattle cans. jimmijim
                              sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

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