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Tire Life info Could Help Studebaker Owners

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  • Tire Life info Could Help Studebaker Owners

    http://www.rma.org/RMA%20Tire%20Serv...cationID=11453

    (copy)
    STATEMENT OF
    RUBBER MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION
    Tire Service Life for Passenger Car and Light Truck Tireswww.rma.org
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

  • #2
    Thanks Jeff. I will rethink changing tires based on age, although I had tire failures on old (8 - 10 yrs) tires. Will research further.

    Comment


    • #3
      So a tire that is 25 years old that has been maintained properly and only has around 5000 miles may be fine?

      Nick

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      • #4
        It is an inexact science.

        No magic test exists that can identify when a tire will fail. The guidelines from the RMA that Jeff posted explain that the consumer plays the primary role.
        Let's say you bought and installed a new set of radials in 1984 and drove 5,000 miles on them. Assuming the vehicle was always stored inside, the storage pressure was reduced to 5 psi, the weight taken off the suspension, no natural sunlight was allowed in the storage facility, no petroleum products, moisture or electric motors in the storage area, drove only on new pavement during cloudy days, between 55 and 70 degrees F; and didn't have the $800 on hand to buy a new set of 4 tires from Coker? Assuming there were no visual cracks or blems in the tires, I believe the RMA's guidelines suggest that perhaps you could coax one more year out that set of tires. Someone else may intrepret the guidelines differently.

        My common sense rule of thumb is - would you want the car coming down the highway in your direction to be rolling on the above set of tires? Kind of like the tire version of the Golden Rule.

        I wouldn't.



        Pat Casey
        55 Commander
        58 Transtar
        62 GT Hawk
        66 Cruiser
        SDC Member since 1988

        Comment


        • #5
          quote:Originally posted by HookedonStudies

          It is an inexact science.

          No magic test exists that can identify when a tire will fail. The guidelines from the RMA that Jeff posted explain that the consumer plays the primary role.
          Let's say you bought and installed a new set of radials in 1984 and drove 5,000 miles on them. Assuming the vehicle was always stored inside, the storage pressure was reduced to 5 psi, the weight taken off the suspension, no natural sunlight was allowed in the storage facility, no petroleum products, moisture or electric motors in the storage area, drove only on new pavement during cloudy days, between 55 and 70 degrees F; and didn't have the $800 on hand to buy a new set of 4 tires from Coker? Assuming there were no visual cracks or blems in the tires, I believe the RMA's guidelines suggest that perhaps you could coax one more year out that set of tires. Someone else may intrepret the guidelines differently.

          My common sense rule of thumb is - would you want the car coming down the highway in your direction to be rolling on the above set of tires? Kind of like the tire version of the Golden Rule.

          I wouldn't.
          Nor would I. I've seen two Corvettes were the tire failed even though they looked OK. Both were over five years old. Both had the quarterpanel ripped off it from the tire carcus.

          ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Tom - Mulberry, FL

          1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

          1964 Studebaker Commander 170-1V, 3-speed w/OD (Cost to Date: $623.67)

          Tom - Bradenton, FL

          1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
          1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

          Comment


          • #6
            Strangely, I had 3 tires fail on me during a trip once -almost as though their expiration date was up.

            Both tire shops I went to said it was really strange. They were expensive tires that had spent a good part of their life in Arizona. I chalked it up as an environment thing.

            FYI -lots of people don't realize that tires have date codes on them. And discount tire places are usually pushing older tires that have spent most of their life sitting in some super hot wharehouse.

            I always check date codes and ask that I'm getting "fresh" inventory.

            Now if I only could learn to shop for food the way I shop for tires

            http://community.webshots.com/user/s...host=community

            Comment


            • #7
              Last summer I had a 'new' truck tire come apart, and lose its entire tread within 2k miles of service.
              Inspection revealed that it had been 'warehoused' for over 5 years prior to my purchase.
              I am now careful to ascertain the manufacture 'date' before the purchase of any replacement tire.
              Personally, I think that an actual 'expiration date' ought to be plainly displayed, with no tire exceeding that set date allowed to be legally sold for highway use.
              That said, my old '48 M-pickup still rolls around the yard well enough on its rock-hard 60 year old tires.

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