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  • buddymander
    replied
    I want to make an adapter for an A4LD, then turbo it.

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  • jclary
    replied
    Thanks for the filter offer. I think I have plenty for now. However, you have my curiosity up now. Are you going to race this engine? In any event, keep us updated on your project and let us know how it turns out.
    One other thing as a side note. Somewhere in the "man cave" I have a spare engine block that someone gave me years ago. It has two oil pumps bolted together. I don't know what the owner was trying to achieve with them. Whatever it was it must have not worked because the motor was locked up. I accepted the "gift" because I thought it had one of those rare "vacuum" pump options offered back in the day to run windshield wipers. I didn't realize until later that it was two oil pumps bolted together. Has anyone else ever seen this?

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  • buddymander
    replied
    Jclary--I think the original intent of Studebaker engineers was to make the oil last longer. My ONLY concern is the rod bearings, actually. I don't care about the rings, mains, valves, timing gears, oil pump, cylinders, etc. I want clean oil (particulate free) going to these particular bearings. They are the weakest link, and I intend to "over-stress" (as you aptly called it) this engine. You can have my bypass filter if you pay shipping.

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  • jclary
    replied
    I really don't see what you intend to gain from all this trouble. My father drove a 1940 Chevy until 1969 with NO oil filter at all. He just changed the oil often. Our Studebaker engines don't take the oil from the bottom of the sump. Therefore, most heavy crap will settle to the bottom of the sump to be drained with the next oil change. The main bearings in our engines are made of rather soft material and small debris that manages to flow into these areas will embed into the bearing material and cause very little wear. I am currently running two flat head six's with no filter. I am planning to re-install filters and they will be stock by-pass style filters. If you are going to accumulate enough debris in your engine to cause engine failure, you'll probably have enough to clog the inlet screen and cause failure anyway. I think that most premature engine failures are due to problems other than well filtered oil. Like running hot, improper choice of oil, improper oil change intervals, or over-stressing and abusing the engine.

    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    I have only two limitations ...BRAINS & ENERGY
    SDC member since 1975

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  • buddymander
    replied
    So, gordr, did you bore out the outlet of the oil pump? Mine has a 1/8" size fitting. I guess I need to bore that to 3/8" and also bore an inlet port to the gallery to 3/8? as well?

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  • gordr
    replied
    Buddy, there are spin-on BYPASS filters out there, the Fram PB50 is one, and that might be what came on your Hawk. If it's plumbed in with thin tubing, like brake line tubing, it has to be a bypass type.

    Now, the Hawk might have had a full-flow remote filter added as an after-market conversion, and if you are sure that's what you have, it'd be OK to use that, I expect.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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  • buddymander
    replied
    Studegary--I don't want ANY particles reaching my bearings. If a tiny particle of bearing or timing gear or crank, rod, piston wears off, it can go straight to the crankshaft journals. What good is clean oil if the crank isn't protected?

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  • buddymander
    replied
    gordr--so you're saying to run 3/8" line, right? the rest is the same, I think. I'll be using a spin on filter on the remote I got with the 57 Silver Hawk I bought. I thought it was what came originally on it. I sure don't want to use the original canister filter that came on the six. I was really considering running the stock six lines if I could find the restrictor and remove it or drill it out.

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  • gordr
    replied
    I'd say you simply cannot use a bypass filter unit in a full-flow application. I really doubt the seal would hold.

    Now, I DID once convert a partial-flow 170 OHV six to full-flow. I bought an after-market remote oil filter base that accepted a PH8 filter, IIRC. Plugged the oil pump outlet like you suggested, and ran a 3/8" hard line to the new filter base, and from the new filter base, a 3/8" hard line ran back to the main oil gallery. This engine did plenty of miles, but was eventually retired for reason of bad rings. The filter system didn't leak.

    If you simply MUST have a full-flow filter on your flathead, I'd suggest you go that route.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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  • buddymander
    replied
    Studerich--A pressure relief valve? Excellent. That should save the filter. Biggs--There's enough meat to open the outlet to 3/8" and the opening to the gallery is machined. It looks like a 7/16" fine thread allen head plug would be best. Studegary--Glad you mentioned that restrictor;I better drill it out. Now what about the restrictor for the lifters? Where's the best place to get one?

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  • jclary
    replied
    So Jeff...at what pressure did the filters blow?

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    I have a custom oiling setup on one of my 289's with dual filters and a reverse flow oiling system for the rocker shafts (you can shut them off)...
    I put adjustable valves on the lines so I could 'adjust' them (or shut off the rockers when I was racing)...
    During some...uh...'testing', I blew a couple of standard ol' spin on filters off the mounts...
    My hood will NEVER rust...
    Pic's are somewhere...
    Jeff[8D]




    http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    Full Flow? So you're blocking the aperture where the pump feeds the gallery and forcing all the oil thru that eighth inch pipe thread outlet? Good luck with that! I could see this having potential IF there's enough meat to open that pipe plug outlet to say, 3/8ths inch AND blocking the outlet to the gallery.[:I]

    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1963 Cruiser
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President two door

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  • jclary
    replied
    Well Gary...were we on the same page?

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  • jclary
    replied
    If I understand you correctly, you are thinking that the external oil line on your pump is the main oil outlet from the pump and that by placing a filter in that line you will obtain a "Full Flow" oil filter. That line along with any other external connection will always give you a "partial flow" or "bypass flow" situation. The "Positive flow" or "Full Flow" from the oil pump to the oil galleries are all internal. In any case, it sounds like you are installing a "spin-on" filter and I like that idea. If your engine is capable of developing enough pressure to blow the filter, you are in rare company.Just make sure that you purchase a fitting with the appropriate flow restriction so that you don't lose oil pressure.

    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    I have only two limitations ...BRAINS & ENERGY
    SDC member since 1975

    Leave a comment:

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