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  • Studebaker Wagon

    Ever since John sat through the Studebaker Wagon talk at the Southwest Zone Meet, he has a new goal to find one out in the "wild" (outside of a museum.) The problem is that they all look alike to a novice. Is there a way to tell if a wagon is a Studebaker without any markings? John was sure this might be one, but all he had to go by was the green paint! Tracy agreed to let John get a wagon but part of the deal is that a horse must come with it!













    John and Tracy Smith
    Queen Creek Arizona
    http://1955studebaker.blogspot.com/
    [IMG]

  • #2
    Must be a Studebaker! There are oil spots on the ground under it.

    '50 Champion, 1 family owner

    Comment


    • #3
      It is my understanding (and I could be wrong) that all Studebaker horse drawn wagons had factory tags somewhere on the chassis. Over the years I have had individuals to call me and offer what they claimed were Studebaker wagons. The ones with tags were probably reasonably priced but more than I was willing to pay. Without a tag and no "authority" to verify, I always refused to consider regardless of the price.

      One of the problems with these wooden vehicles, is that repairs and rebuilds could have resulted in the tag being lost. Perhaps there is someone with the expertise who could authenticate a wagon with a missing tag. I just don't know but would be very hesitant to purchase one merely on the "claim" that it is a Studebaker.

      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      I have only two limitations ...BRAINS & ENERGY
      SDC member since 1975
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

      Comment


      • #4
        Guido would know. Where is he?


        [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

        Clark in San Diego
        '63 F2/Lark Standard
        http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
        www.studebakersandiego.com

        Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Places to look for the Studebaker name:

          Axles
          hub-caps (which this wagon appears not to have)
          Springs
          Makers plate (usually located on the back side of the rear axle cap)
          bottom of seat

          A few things I should point out here: first, a hub-cap for a wagon is about the size of a saucer or tea-cup. They screw into the metal banding at the outside of the wheel hub. An axlecap is a wooden strip that tapers on each end. They are attached by many straps, nuts and bolts to the top of the axle. Usually, there is a place on the back axle where a place is made to accomodate the maker's plate. Kind of like the vin plate on the door post of an automobile, though with less information. Typically, these were lost as the axle is unsprung and subject to direct shock with every rock, crevase and hole in the road (or field, whatever). Wagons really quite rarely travelled on roads in the west. There simply weren't many to speak of. When the mid-twentieth century came round and people started using these vehicles for display, some had the foresight to remove this maker's plate, which was often hanging by one tiny screw, and place them under the driver's seat. Some people took the maker's plates off to collect. Others sold them. Most often the wagons were left to rot in fields or as a display in front of a store of some sort. Like the one in this picture.

          If this wagon is a Studebaker, it's axles WILL have the Studebaker foundry marks on them. Look carefully.

          By the by, John Deere also made green and yellow wagons as did several other manufacturers of horse-drawn farm equipment and wagons.

          Now, let's leave our hearts aside and use our heads in regards to the wagon pictured. John, the wood in this vehicle is dried beyond any possible use. It would be foolhardy beyond belief to attempt to put horses to this vehicle. Unless one wishes the vehicle for the type of display it's currently doing, it simply can't be made safe.

          If you really want a good, safe Studebaker wagon, buggy, or carriage, try these e-dresses:

          Martin's Auctioneers is one of the best resources for antique horse-drawn vehicles of any kind:
          http://www.auctionzip.com/PA-Auctioneers/975.html

          Another resource is Alvin Raber and his son in Millersburg Ohio:
          http://www.a-dbuggy.com/for_sale1.htm

          Here's a vehicle Alvin currently has for sale:


          This is called a Gig and is an excellent vehicle for a beginner. The Rabers are asking $3500 as is. Which for this kind of vehicle is average. Gigs are kinda expensive. Buggies are much more reasonable, as Guido can tell you.

          Another resource is the Carriage Mart:
          http://carriagemart.com/

          It's kinda like the Craig's list of horse-drawn vehicles.

          Just like our cars, these vehicles when restored can be a bit pricey. In fact, they often sell for the same price as an automobile. Though, most simple vehicles, like Buggies and Wagons, sell in the range of fifteen hundred to about two thousand for a fully operational, um, driver.




          Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
          K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
          Ron Smith
          Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
          Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
          K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
          Ron Smith
          Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

          Comment


          • #6
            How about a Surrey-with-the-fringe-on-top? The 'bay has one right now. The reserve is probably around fifteen hundred to two thousand:

            http://cgi.ebay.com/STUDEBAKER-SURRE...A1%7C294%3A100

            They claim it's in restored, driveable condition. Looks good in the pictures. It also looks more like a three-spring wagon with a standing top, but who am I to rain on the parade? It comes with a pole (for a pair). By the by, Shafts (for a single horse) can be procured for this vehicle from Raber's, Whitmers, or any other supplier.

            Tracy, if you and John want a horse-drawn Studebaker, this would be one of the better routes to go. It's small enough to drive with one horse (in a flat area), and can still carry passengers. An ore wagon, like the one pictured above, would rattle your teeth out of your head and requires a minimum of two to four horses. However, they make a great yard ornament. Just keep the sprinklers off it.


            Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
            K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
            Ron Smith
            Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
            Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
            K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
            Ron Smith
            Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

            Comment


            • #7
              Sorry we haven't responded to your post, Ron. We were on a family vacation. That being said, "Wow!" We didn't know that you had so much knowledge about wagons. We obviously have much to learn, but thank you for a very good start. We are watching the carriage (VERY CLOSELY)on ebay.

              John and Tracy Smith
              Queen Creek Arizona
              http://1955studebaker.blogspot.com/
              [IMG]

              Comment


              • #8
                Here's another venue to consider outside of the 'bay:

                http://www.auctionzip.com/PA-Auctioneers/975.html

                Martin's is one of the oldest and most reliable of the auction houses dealing with horse-drawn vehicles. Also, another organization you might consider joining if you even remotely consider actually using a carriage or wagon is the American Driving Society:

                http://www.americandrivingsociety.org/

                There's a lot more to driving horses than just harnessing them up and toddling down the road. After all, we don't just toss our children the keys to a car till after they've had adequate instruction behind the wheel and been certified as a driver, right?

                One thing I stressed (admittedly a bit too strongly sometimes[:I]) with the people I was training, along with their horses, was to start out small. By this, I meant to start with a two-wheeled vehicle and a single horse. Also, for beginners, to stay away from 'Meadowbrook' carts.

                <edit>

                You know, I just noticed the Gig in my earlier post is missing it's hub-caps. On the end of the wheel's hub is a metal band. This band is back-threaded to accept a brass cover which screws inside the band. It usually bears the company logo and year of manufacture. Collectors love them, hence the reason they are almost uniformly missing.[V]

                Here's another link for you:

                http://carriagemart.com/

                It's kinda like Craig's List for horse-drawn vehicles.




                Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                Ron Smith
                Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
                Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                Ron Smith
                Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yessir....
                  Sent my Morgan up to the Amish to get his training.
                  He came back a different horse, for sure.
                  We drove him all around with a Hogan training cart (a HD sulky), and went though a learning curve...
                  Bought a 'doctors buggy' of unknown origin with the intent of refurbishing it and driving with it.
                  Somebody wanted it worse than I did and it was sold.
                  Then I sold the Morgan.

                  If anyone wants a show harness for pulling, I have a nice black leather one that will sell very reasonable.
                  Jeff[8D]


                  quote:Originally posted by studeclunker
                  <snip>
                  There's a lot more to driving horses than just harnessing them up and toddling down the road.
                  <snip>
                  HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                  Jeff


                  Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                  Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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