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  • #31
    mine has all of those.. but no back up lights...

    Bob Sporner
    Palm Springs, California

    Comment


    • #32
      quote:Originally posted by 63larkcustom
      here is the production order.
      Great information, Bob! Between this thread and the TT thread and a few others, it looks like just about anything was possible out of South Bend (and the other factories) [^]. I would NEVER be a judge in a stock class [:0]. An absolute impossible task.

      It is also a little strange that on your Production Order, the car is called a Deluxe (if I'm reading it right)...when there was no Deluxe model offered in '63.

      In a way, it's kinda good that Studebaker produced all these exceptions. It really makes it that much more interesting [8D]


      Dick Steinkamp
      Bellingham, WA
      Dick Steinkamp
      Bellingham, WA

      Comment


      • #33
        quote:Originally posted by 63larkcustom
        here is the production order.
        Great information, Bob! Between this thread and the TT thread and a few others, it looks like just about anything was possible out of South Bend (and the other factories) [^]. I would NEVER be a judge in a stock class [:0]. An absolute impossible task.

        It is also a little strange that on your Production Order, the car is called a Deluxe (if I'm reading it right)...when there was no Deluxe model offered in '63.

        In a way, it's kinda good that Studebaker produced all these exceptions. It really makes it that much more interesting [8D]


        Dick Steinkamp
        Bellingham, WA
        Dick Steinkamp
        Bellingham, WA

        Comment


        • #34
          does that mean this is an oddball car?

          Bob Sporner
          Palm Springs, California

          Comment


          • #35
            does that mean this is an oddball car?

            Bob Sporner
            Palm Springs, California

            Comment


            • #36

              It is also a little strange that on your Production Order, the car is called a Deluxe (if I'm reading it right)...when there was no Deluxe model offered in '63.


              Then you'll love this build sheet for a Hamilton built '62 G.T. Hawk that is owned by a member here. Note it is still labelled as a 'Silver' Hawk. I've heard most of the Canadian production orders continued to use that term long after 1959. You'll have to let us know what the build sheet for yours reads, Dick, since it's also from Hamilton. Also note the 'chrome air intakes'; something only Hamilton built '62 GT's had.



              Craig

              Comment


              • #37

                It is also a little strange that on your Production Order, the car is called a Deluxe (if I'm reading it right)...when there was no Deluxe model offered in '63.


                Then you'll love this build sheet for a Hamilton built '62 G.T. Hawk that is owned by a member here. Note it is still labelled as a 'Silver' Hawk. I've heard most of the Canadian production orders continued to use that term long after 1959. You'll have to let us know what the build sheet for yours reads, Dick, since it's also from Hamilton. Also note the 'chrome air intakes'; something only Hamilton built '62 GT's had.



                Craig

                Comment


                • #38
                  quote:Originally posted by 8E45E



                  It is also a little strange that on your Production Order, the car is called a Deluxe (if I'm reading it right)...when there was no Deluxe model offered in '63.


                  Craig
                  This is an oddity of early 1963 production that has come up before. Somebody forgot to tell the production-order writers that, henceforth, the DeLuxe ("4" trim level cars) would be called Regals [:0] for the 1963 model year. One like this, a "4", would have been considered a Regal when shipped, sold, and inventoried.

                  There are several early 1963 production orders for Regals floating around, like this one, where the car was identified as a DeLuxe on the build order. Yes, that was holdover terminology from 1962. Fortunately, I've never seen any documents for public consumption, like sales catalogs, wherein Regals were identified as DeLuxes. That would really shake up the authenticity troops! [8D] BP
                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  Ayn Rand:
                  "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    quote:Originally posted by 8E45E



                    It is also a little strange that on your Production Order, the car is called a Deluxe (if I'm reading it right)...when there was no Deluxe model offered in '63.


                    Craig
                    This is an oddity of early 1963 production that has come up before. Somebody forgot to tell the production-order writers that, henceforth, the DeLuxe ("4" trim level cars) would be called Regals [:0] for the 1963 model year. One like this, a "4", would have been considered a Regal when shipped, sold, and inventoried.

                    There are several early 1963 production orders for Regals floating around, like this one, where the car was identified as a DeLuxe on the build order. Yes, that was holdover terminology from 1962. Fortunately, I've never seen any documents for public consumption, like sales catalogs, wherein Regals were identified as DeLuxes. That would really shake up the authenticity troops! [8D] BP
                    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                    Ayn Rand:
                    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      If a factory worker ordered a new Studebaker, could he know which one it was during assembly? I know one factory where, at one time, employee ordered cars were not built to the order sheet. The order sheet was usually for a base model, but the owner would follow his car through the plant and make sure a lot of "goodies" were fitted. Those cars were also the best-built ones, and often sported non-standard accessory combinations. But, they were all "factory fitted".
                      /H

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        If a factory worker ordered a new Studebaker, could he know which one it was during assembly? I know one factory where, at one time, employee ordered cars were not built to the order sheet. The order sheet was usually for a base model, but the owner would follow his car through the plant and make sure a lot of "goodies" were fitted. Those cars were also the best-built ones, and often sported non-standard accessory combinations. But, they were all "factory fitted".
                        /H

                        Comment


                        • #42




                          There are several early 1963 production orders for Regals floating around, like this one, where the car was identified as a DeLuxe on the build order. Yes, that was holdover terminology from 1962.

                          Bob, its kind of an interesting way the marketing people do things, and not only at Studebaker. The Regal was the top-of-the-line trim on most Studebakers in the late forties, and by 1963, it was the lowest level of trim; at least until the Standard came out. Remember in the early to mid fifties, the Bel-Air was the top model Chevrolet. Then the Impala came out in 1958, and the Caprice in mid 1965. By 1981, the Bel-Air was the el-strippo base model of the full-size B-body Chevrolet line. (the Biscayne was discontinued by then).

                          Craig

                          Comment


                          • #43




                            There are several early 1963 production orders for Regals floating around, like this one, where the car was identified as a DeLuxe on the build order. Yes, that was holdover terminology from 1962.

                            Bob, its kind of an interesting way the marketing people do things, and not only at Studebaker. The Regal was the top-of-the-line trim on most Studebakers in the late forties, and by 1963, it was the lowest level of trim; at least until the Standard came out. Remember in the early to mid fifties, the Bel-Air was the top model Chevrolet. Then the Impala came out in 1958, and the Caprice in mid 1965. By 1981, the Bel-Air was the el-strippo base model of the full-size B-body Chevrolet line. (the Biscayne was discontinued by then).

                            Craig

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp

                              quote:Originally posted by 63larkcustom
                              here is the production order.
                              Great information, Bob! Between this thread and the TT thread and a few others, it looks like just about anything was possible out of South Bend (and the other factories) [^]. I would NEVER be a judge in a stock class [:0]. An absolute impossible task.

                              It is also a little strange that on your Production Order, the car is called a Deluxe (if I'm reading it right)...when there was no Deluxe model offered in '63.

                              In a way, it's kinda good that Studebaker produced all these exceptions. It really makes it that much more interesting [8D]
                              Back when I was dickering to buy my '64 Daytona Wagonaire I talked at some length to the Anderson Brothers in Garnett, Kansas. Theirs was a family dealership that existed since the wagon days. One brother told me that they could walk in to the (Studebaker) President's office and order anything they wanted no matter what the options listing said.

                              [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
                              '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
                              '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
                              '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
                              Museum R-4 engine
                              Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                              '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp

                                quote:Originally posted by 63larkcustom
                                here is the production order.
                                Great information, Bob! Between this thread and the TT thread and a few others, it looks like just about anything was possible out of South Bend (and the other factories) [^]. I would NEVER be a judge in a stock class [:0]. An absolute impossible task.

                                It is also a little strange that on your Production Order, the car is called a Deluxe (if I'm reading it right)...when there was no Deluxe model offered in '63.

                                In a way, it's kinda good that Studebaker produced all these exceptions. It really makes it that much more interesting [8D]
                                Back when I was dickering to buy my '64 Daytona Wagonaire I talked at some length to the Anderson Brothers in Garnett, Kansas. Theirs was a family dealership that existed since the wagon days. One brother told me that they could walk in to the (Studebaker) President's office and order anything they wanted no matter what the options listing said.

                                [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
                                '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
                                '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
                                '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
                                Museum R-4 engine
                                Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                                '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                                Comment

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