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  • New Hawk in my garage!

    Stepped into the garage a few minutes ago, and found a new Hawk therein. Looks like he's got a bunged wing. Yes, I've named him Studebaker.



    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1963 Cruiser
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President two door

    No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

  • #2
    Wow That is really neat but Me Thinks its an OWL thats said I have been wrong before . Neat Find.

    Mabel 1949 Champion
    1957 Silverhawk
    1955 Champion 4Dr.Regal
    Gus 1958 Transtar
    1955 President State
    1957 Golden Hawk
    Fresno,Ca
    Mabel 1949 Champion
    Hawk 1957 Silverhawk
    Gus 1958 Transtar
    The Prez 1955 President State
    Blu 1957 Golden Hawk
    Daisy 1954 Regal Commander Starlight Coupe
    Fresno,Ca

    Comment


    • #3
      Very much a Hawk, Anne! More precisely, a Cooper's Hawk

      1957 Transtar 1/2ton
      1963 Cruiser
      1960 Larkvertible V8
      1958 Provincial wagon
      1953 Commander coupe
      1957 President two door

      No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, here is a link to more about the Cooper's Hawk.

        http://www.peregrine-foundation.ca/raptors/Coopers.html

        <h5>Mark
        '57 Transtar Deluxe
        Vancouver Island

        The NW Overdrive Tour in Parksville, BC
        May 23 & 24, 2009; check it out at -
        http://sdcvi.shawwebspace.ca/
        </h5>
        Mark Hayden
        '66 Commander
        Zone Coordinator
        Pacific Can-Am Zone

        Comment


        • #5
          My Brothers and I found one of these when we were kids. It had a wounded wing. We penned it up and nursed it back to health. Even though we were caring for it and feeding it, the little devil would lay on it's back and try to kill us with it's talons and beak if we got too close. Actually, he was a pretty big bird. They look magnificent soaring, but a wild adult can be quiet dangerous up close. Don't let your state DMV know about the new 'Studebaker the Hawk", or they will probably figure out a way to tax you for it.

          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          I have only two limitations ...BRAINS & ENERGY
          SDC member since 1975
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

          Comment


          • #6
            Mr. Biggs...

            The keeping of many types of raptors (eagles, hawks, owls) are tightly controlled.
            You may not be able to keep it, in other words, yes, it is a federal case.
            These rules make gun control laws look like Swiss cheese. Really.

            Contact the state wildlife office. They'll turn him over to a raptor center for rehab to return to the wild (not always possible) or they'll keep him as a live educational exhibit. My wife and I've gone to a couple of lectures by a local group, and that's how they got their display birds.

            The sooner he gets into trained hands, the greater the possibility of him being able to be returned to the wild.



            63 Avanti R1 2788
            1914 Stutz Bearcat
            (George Barris replica)

            Washington State
            63 Avanti R1 2788
            1914 Stutz Bearcat
            (George Barris replica)

            Washington State

            Comment


            • #7
              Feathered rodent protection!! [)]
              Around here we usually see the Chicken Hawk(Red Tailed hawk) and the Turkey hawk(Turkey vulture). Both love being perched high on the arm of a telephone pole, both love eating smaller furry critters(although the Turkey vulture is essentially a scavenger), and they make for a great spectacle to watch as they cast a black outline and they like to glide.

              Interesting enough the unofficial name Chicken Hawk name applies to the Red Tailed Hawk, the Cooper Hawk, and the Sharp-shinned Hawk, as well as one famous racer in our troupe. Just a name to think about ......

              Edit:
              Yes, this could get sticky as it may not be a DMV case, but it might upset some people in DNR or Department of Natural Resources.

              [IMG=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/55%20Studebaker%20Commander%20Streetrod%20Project/DSC00017-1-1.jpg[/IMG=left]
              [IMG=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/55%20Studebaker%20Commander%20Streetrod%20Project/DSC00015-2-1.jpg[/IMG=left]
              [IMG=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/Ex%20Studebaker%20Plant%20Locomotive/P1000578-1.jpg[/IMG=right]
              [IMG=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201964%20Studebaker%20Commander%20R2/P1010168.jpg[/IMG=right]

              1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
              1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
              1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
              1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

              Comment


              • #8
                He's lucky he's not named mini.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Way ahead of you guys. As much as I like birds, the wrath of an angry parrot is enough to learn me that I want nothing to do with this guy. There's a wildlife rehab place near here, Called Critter Creek Rescue. I called one of their volunteers and he asked me if I thought I could catch and box the bird until he can get here later.

                  Back in the garage, the bird seemed pretty cool with me walking around him. He just followed me with those penetrating, super-fast blinking eyes. It was kinda spooky, but I figured if it came right down to it, he'd rather run than try to do me harm. The garage door was open, so there was lots of space for him to clear me.

                  I spied a good-sized and sturdy box to put him in, but had to clear the Stude parts out of it first. In spite of the banging of some hubcaps and me lifting the box high to clear some other Stude stuff, he sat rather relaxed and just watched.
                  I put some holes in the box and then went and retrieved the fish net I've never used for fishing and extended the handle on it. I also wisely grabbed a pair of welding gloves. Glove on, net extended, I approached my prey while talking softly to him. I got the net to within two feet of him and while he reared back a bit, he didn't bolt. When I was ready I snapped the net over him before he knew what was coming! He had moved, earlier, to where he was sitting on an open box with some various cans in it. With the net ove him, he splayed out on his back and looked terrified.
                  I managed to pick up box, Hawk and net and set them on the pavement - next to the transport box I had ready. Heh.... I went with my left hand to pull up on the net a bit and four serious-looking talons sunk into the thumb of the welding glove! I was NEVER so happy that those gloves are oversize as I was just then!
                  I just let him clutch the glove leather as I gently lifted him and the net up and over to the waiting box. He let go and plunked into the box. I slapped the flaps shut and then put a band of strapping tape around the whole box to keep it closed. The rescue guy's supposed to be here in an hour or so.

                  Beautiful creature. I've had trouble with this species raiding my dove cage. I had to suspend a second wall around the cage because these guys will quickly figure out that even tho they can't get IN the cage, if they keep bouncing off the wires, they drive the doves into a panic. Once the doves are literally bouncing off the walls, it's merely a matter of timing for those talons to snag a dove right thru the wire! Then they eat what they can and let the rest drop inside the cage. Took me quite a while to figure out how stripped carcasses were showing up INside the cage - until one day I SAW an attack taking place.

                  1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                  1963 Cruiser
                  1960 Larkvertible V8
                  1958 Provincial wagon
                  1953 Commander coupe
                  1957 President two door

                  No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here's a rare (like, one-of-a-kind) Hawk.

                    [img] http://imagehost.vendio.com/a/309061...Hawkemblem.jpg [/img]

                    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                    1963 Cruiser
                    1960 Larkvertible V8
                    1958 Provincial wagon
                    1953 Commander coupe
                    1957 President two door

                    No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

                      Way ahead of you guys. As much as I like birds, the wrath of an angry parrot is enough to learn me that I want nothing to do with this guy. There's a wildlife rehab place near here, Called Critter Creek Rescue. I called one of their volunteers and he asked me if I thought I could catch and box the bird until he can get here later.

                      Back in the garage, the bird seemed pretty cool with me walking around him. He just followed me with those penetrating, super-fast blinking eyes. It was kinda spooky, but I figured if it came right down to it, he'd rather run than try to do me harm. The garage door was open, so there was lots of space for him to clear me.

                      I spied a good-sized and sturdy box to put him in, but had to clear the Stude parts out of it first. In spite of the banging of some hubcaps and me lifting the box high to clear some other Stude stuff, he sat rather relaxed and just watched.
                      I put some holes in the box and then went and retrieved the fish net I've never used for fishing and extended the handle on it. I also wisely grabbed a pair of welding gloves. Glove on, net extended, I approached my prey while talking softly to him. I got the net to within two feet of him and while he reared back a bit, he didn't bolt. When I was ready I snapped the net over him before he knew what was coming! He had moved, earlier, to where he was sitting on an open box with some various cans in it. With the net ove him, he splayed out on his back and looked terrified.
                      I managed to pick up box, Hawk and net and set them on the pavement - next to the transport box I had ready. Heh.... I went with my left hand to pull up on the net a bit and four serious-looking talons sunk into the thumb of the welding glove! I was NEVER so happy that those gloves are oversize as I was just then!
                      I just let him clutch the glove leather as I gently lifted him and the net up and over to the waiting box. He let go and plunked into the box. I slapped the flaps shut and then put a band of strapping tape around the whole box to keep it closed. The rescue guy's supposed to be here in an hour or so.

                      Beautiful creature. I've had trouble with this species raiding my dove cage. I had to suspend a second wall around the cage because these guys will quickly figure out that even tho they can't get IN the cage, if they keep bouncing off the wires, they drive the doves into a panic. Once the doves are literally bouncing off the walls, it's merely a matter of timing for those talons to snag a dove right thru the wire! Then they eat what they can and let the rest drop inside the cage. Took me quite a while to figure out how stripped carcasses were showing up INside the cage - until one day I SAW an attack taking place.
                      [8D] An interesting account, Bob. The explanation of the carcasses inside the cages shows how creative they are! BP

                      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                      Ayn Rand:
                      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This is Allahans dove just out side
                        of back door.



                        My 62 Hawk is in front of house & under TREE!!!!

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          One last photo about this. The rescue guy picked Studebaker up a few minutes ago. He wasn't afeered a no lethal bird! Picked him up and felt of his broken wing. Said they'd see if he could be mended and released again. I'd bet anything, this Hawk's mate is looking for it at this very moment.
                          The guy asked if he could come back here to release it should it get to where it can fly again. Of course!



                          1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                          1963 Cruiser
                          1960 Larkvertible V8
                          1958 Provincial wagon
                          1953 Commander coupe
                          1957 President two door

                          No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yer cooper hawk looks like it has golden feathers on its breast...Sort of a Golden Hawk. Why didn't they name them Gold Hawks and Silverish Hawks?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My daughter prepares large and small raptors and numerous other wild critters for show and tell sessions at the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum here in Tucson. Her take--even well trained hawks can take off a finger (or worse) if handled wrong so obviously you did something right, and you rescued a beautiful animal and so are a hero. Sheesh, she never called me a hero for rescueing a Studebaker...


                              Jeff Jones
                              Tucson Arizona
                              1947 M-5

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