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  • Just how DID you get into it?

    bams50's thread got me thinking. Just how did YOU get into Studebakering? Me? Well, I'm a 4th generation Stude owner/driver as it all started with my great-grandad. He owned a few Studes in the '50's-'60's as they were good, cheap cars. My grandad learned how to drive in a '60 Lark wagon that he owned. When my grandad turned 16 in 1965, he bought him a '48 Champ rag top for $35.00. He drove it a few years and after the tires got slick at the top rotted and blew off, he decided to get something else. Since then, he's has numerous Studes. Some of the more interesting ones are a '40 Commander, '56 Sky Hawk with OD trans, a '62 Lark with R1 goodies on it, several Hawks and Larks and a few trucks.
    When my Mom was 16, he bought her a $50.00 '63 Daytona HT and fixed it up for her. She drove it a while and then decided to move on after a couple of years. Fast forward to the year 2000. I got the car for my 10'th birthday. My Mom's "I Love the Class of '87" bumper sticker was still on it. (Well, still is actually!)
    As the Daytona is in the shop waiting to be finished, I drive my '59 Scotsman everyday. It's a tough old truck that likes to be driven. I'm a 4th generation Stude driver and darned proud of it! (How many folks can claim that? )

    So, what's your story? [8D]

    ___________________________________________

    Matthew Burnette
    Hazlehurst, Georgia
    '59 Scotsman PU
    '63 Daytona HT



    http://mbstudebaker.blogspot.com/
    http://thestudillac.blogspot.com/

  • #2
    That's EXACTLY what I was asking in my thread... somehow it got OT a little... [B)] I was hoping to hear specifically HOW and WHY we got into Studes...

    Anyway- for my answer to your question, read my original post in my thread titled, "Why would anyone want a Studebaker?"



    Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
    Parish, central NY 13131
    http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

    Comment


    • #3
      That's EXACTLY what I was asking in my thread... somehow it got OT a little... [B)] I was hoping to hear specifically HOW and WHY we got into Studes...

      Anyway- for my answer to your question, read my original post in my thread titled, "Why would anyone want a Studebaker?"



      Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
      Parish, central NY 13131
      http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

      Comment


      • #4
        Easy...like a lot of guys I was taken in by a pretty face.

        As a 10 year old in the mid 60s I didn't know much about Studebakers other than my gold plated Corgi Golden Hawk toy and Avantis.

        From my older brother (who was sports car mad) I learned Avantis were fast and exotic. Maybe not quite as exotic as an E-Type Jaguar but far more so than Corvettes...We lived on a air base and second generation 'Vettes were fairly common. Avantis seemed like a sports car for classy guys.

        Thinking of myself as a fairly classy guy and wanting another older car, I finally bought one. I had never driven one (other than a GM chassis & powered 87 model) until the day mine was delivered...and I think my 63 has it beat in nearly every way.
        I'm looking forward to getting it really sorted out so I can play in the summer.

        While I don't have another older Studebaker (a C-K, Lark, Hawk or GT) doesn't mean I don't like them. We had a 63 Rambler Classic growing up so I do have a soft spot for the independents. I really like the looks of the 64s...I'd like a wagon with the sliding top. It would be a great car to carry my basset hound (that would look like something straight out of the early 60s when bassets were really popular).



        63 Avanti R1 2788
        1914 Stutz Bearcat
        (George Barris replica)

        Washington State
        63 Avanti R1 2788
        1914 Stutz Bearcat
        (George Barris replica)

        Washington State

        Comment


        • #5
          Easy...like a lot of guys I was taken in by a pretty face.

          As a 10 year old in the mid 60s I didn't know much about Studebakers other than my gold plated Corgi Golden Hawk toy and Avantis.

          From my older brother (who was sports car mad) I learned Avantis were fast and exotic. Maybe not quite as exotic as an E-Type Jaguar but far more so than Corvettes...We lived on a air base and second generation 'Vettes were fairly common. Avantis seemed like a sports car for classy guys.

          Thinking of myself as a fairly classy guy and wanting another older car, I finally bought one. I had never driven one (other than a GM chassis & powered 87 model) until the day mine was delivered...and I think my 63 has it beat in nearly every way.
          I'm looking forward to getting it really sorted out so I can play in the summer.

          While I don't have another older Studebaker (a C-K, Lark, Hawk or GT) doesn't mean I don't like them. We had a 63 Rambler Classic growing up so I do have a soft spot for the independents. I really like the looks of the 64s...I'd like a wagon with the sliding top. It would be a great car to carry my basset hound (that would look like something straight out of the early 60s when bassets were really popular).



          63 Avanti R1 2788
          1914 Stutz Bearcat
          (George Barris replica)

          Washington State
          63 Avanti R1 2788
          1914 Stutz Bearcat
          (George Barris replica)

          Washington State

          Comment


          • #6
            Well Matt, I know I've told this story before, but...

            Quite by chance, I found myself working in an auto restoration place in Marietta Georgia along about 1972 or 73. Thru some really quirky developments, within a year I was senior man in the mechanical dept.. As such, I hired a young fella that drifted in the shop door one day. Since it was obvious he had decent mechanical skills and we were in need of some help, I thought he might do well in our shop. More specifically we needed some help that had feelings for antique/exotic vehicles like this young-un did.
            That he had those feelings was in no small part due to the fact that his family had always bought and driven Studebakers and were still driving them at that time. Once hired, he'd show up each day in either his Avanti, a GT Hawk or a Wagonaire. He also had a Jag roadster and a 53 Packard that had been in the family since new.
            I'd honestly NEVER paid attention to Studebakers prior to his formally introducing me to them and I was quickly won over by them. Here was a make, that like me, went it's own way - their ultimate failure only added to the mystique/attraction. That and the fact that there were SO MANY NOS parts available at bargain basement prices!
            I quickly gave second thought to the '60 Lark ragtop I knew was sitting forlornly under an old oak tree. Bought it for $35 bucks and 34 years later, here I am, intrigued by your story and interests in all things Studebaker!

            Miscreant adrift in
            the BerStuda Triangle


            1957 Transtar 1/2ton
            1960 Larkvertible V8
            1958 Provincial wagon
            1953 Commander coupe

            No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

            Comment


            • #7
              Well Matt, I know I've told this story before, but...

              Quite by chance, I found myself working in an auto restoration place in Marietta Georgia along about 1972 or 73. Thru some really quirky developments, within a year I was senior man in the mechanical dept.. As such, I hired a young fella that drifted in the shop door one day. Since it was obvious he had decent mechanical skills and we were in need of some help, I thought he might do well in our shop. More specifically we needed some help that had feelings for antique/exotic vehicles like this young-un did.
              That he had those feelings was in no small part due to the fact that his family had always bought and driven Studebakers and were still driving them at that time. Once hired, he'd show up each day in either his Avanti, a GT Hawk or a Wagonaire. He also had a Jag roadster and a 53 Packard that had been in the family since new.
              I'd honestly NEVER paid attention to Studebakers prior to his formally introducing me to them and I was quickly won over by them. Here was a make, that like me, went it's own way - their ultimate failure only added to the mystique/attraction. That and the fact that there were SO MANY NOS parts available at bargain basement prices!
              I quickly gave second thought to the '60 Lark ragtop I knew was sitting forlornly under an old oak tree. Bought it for $35 bucks and 34 years later, here I am, intrigued by your story and interests in all things Studebaker!

              Miscreant adrift in
              the BerStuda Triangle


              1957 Transtar 1/2ton
              1960 Larkvertible V8
              1958 Provincial wagon
              1953 Commander coupe

              No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

              Comment


              • #8
                As my brother Mike (hotwheels63r2) pointed out, it's a family thing~
                Our Grandfather was a salesman during the mid '50s and early '60s... just about the time our Dad (StudeRich) was a teenager. From what Dad tells us Grandpa would get a different car in the driveway just about once a week. He of course was destined to fall for them in a big way. Growing up, Mike and I got to ride around in the back of the many Studes that came and went as well. Some have been around for as long as I can remember. The Champ has been in the family since it was new, when our Grandfather sold it to himself!!!

                In a 'round about way I finally got to own one of the cars I had always wanted growing up- her name is Betsy. The rest just sort of showed up when I was in the right place, at the right time...


                StudeDave [8D]
                V/P San Diego County SDC
                San Diego, Ca


                '54 Commander 4dr 'Ruby'
                '57 Parkview (it's a 2dr wagon...) 'Betsy'
                '57 Commander 2dr 'Baby'
                '57 Champion 2dr 'Jewel'
                '58 Packard sedan 'Cleo'
                '65 Cruiser 'Sweet Pea'
                StudeDave '57
                US Navy (retired)

                3rd Generation Stude owner/driver
                SDC Member since 1985

                past President
                Whatcom County Chapter SDC
                San Diego Chapter SDC

                past Vice President
                San Diego Chapter SDC
                North Florida Chapter SDC

                Comment


                • #9
                  As my brother Mike (hotwheels63r2) pointed out, it's a family thing~
                  Our Grandfather was a salesman during the mid '50s and early '60s... just about the time our Dad (StudeRich) was a teenager. From what Dad tells us Grandpa would get a different car in the driveway just about once a week. He of course was destined to fall for them in a big way. Growing up, Mike and I got to ride around in the back of the many Studes that came and went as well. Some have been around for as long as I can remember. The Champ has been in the family since it was new, when our Grandfather sold it to himself!!!

                  In a 'round about way I finally got to own one of the cars I had always wanted growing up- her name is Betsy. The rest just sort of showed up when I was in the right place, at the right time...


                  StudeDave [8D]
                  V/P San Diego County SDC
                  San Diego, Ca


                  '54 Commander 4dr 'Ruby'
                  '57 Parkview (it's a 2dr wagon...) 'Betsy'
                  '57 Commander 2dr 'Baby'
                  '57 Champion 2dr 'Jewel'
                  '58 Packard sedan 'Cleo'
                  '65 Cruiser 'Sweet Pea'
                  StudeDave '57
                  US Navy (retired)

                  3rd Generation Stude owner/driver
                  SDC Member since 1985

                  past President
                  Whatcom County Chapter SDC
                  San Diego Chapter SDC

                  past Vice President
                  San Diego Chapter SDC
                  North Florida Chapter SDC

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well, just a little over a year ago I "discovered" Studebakers by accident. I have had several old cars in the past -58 Plymouth, 60 Catalina, 66 Mustang, 70 Buick Skylark, 65 Galaxie 500XL, 69 Coronet, Triumph Spitfire etc. I have always been a fan of the "plain Jane" sedans for some reason. I saw an ad in the local paper for a "59 Studebaker 2 door sedan. U.S car. $1000". I went for a look and found the owner, in his 70's. He was selling the Lark due to the fact he had sold his house and was moving into a retirement home. He used to own a farm and a young couple had brought it back from Pa. and started to work on it.They rented space in his workshop. Well, they split up and he never saw them again. After 10 years he managed to get ownership of the car and started to do some more work on the car. When I saw it I marvelled on how solid it really was. Sure, there was some front floor rust, but the rest of the car was pretty good- no "scaly" rust anywhere else. The interior was trashed. Here's a photo at the old fellas house:

                    Not knowing a thing about Studebakers, I figured it would make a great Rat Rod and a Chevy motor would likely fit quite nicely. I offered $800 (which maybe was still a bit high..) and called a tow truck to take it home. The tow truck driver had his wife with him and she said to me "If he ever brought a car like that home, I'd leave him!". Luckily my current wife is more understanding! Only after searching the web did I realize it was in fact a 63. Little did I know there would be such a huge resource of information and parts- several right here in town! The only "surprises" I've had were the fact someone bondoed over the quarter panel to rocker seams and the front fenders being patched. I am now hooked on these darn cars and have a Champ and C/K on my wish list. I see no reason why I'd want any other marque.
                    Todd


                    63 Lark 2dr Sedan
                    64 Daytona 4dr Sedan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Well, just a little over a year ago I "discovered" Studebakers by accident. I have had several old cars in the past -58 Plymouth, 60 Catalina, 66 Mustang, 70 Buick Skylark, 65 Galaxie 500XL, 69 Coronet, Triumph Spitfire etc. I have always been a fan of the "plain Jane" sedans for some reason. I saw an ad in the local paper for a "59 Studebaker 2 door sedan. U.S car. $1000". I went for a look and found the owner, in his 70's. He was selling the Lark due to the fact he had sold his house and was moving into a retirement home. He used to own a farm and a young couple had brought it back from Pa. and started to work on it.They rented space in his workshop. Well, they split up and he never saw them again. After 10 years he managed to get ownership of the car and started to do some more work on the car. When I saw it I marvelled on how solid it really was. Sure, there was some front floor rust, but the rest of the car was pretty good- no "scaly" rust anywhere else. The interior was trashed. Here's a photo at the old fellas house:

                      Not knowing a thing about Studebakers, I figured it would make a great Rat Rod and a Chevy motor would likely fit quite nicely. I offered $800 (which maybe was still a bit high..) and called a tow truck to take it home. The tow truck driver had his wife with him and she said to me "If he ever brought a car like that home, I'd leave him!". Luckily my current wife is more understanding! Only after searching the web did I realize it was in fact a 63. Little did I know there would be such a huge resource of information and parts- several right here in town! The only "surprises" I've had were the fact someone bondoed over the quarter panel to rocker seams and the front fenders being patched. I am now hooked on these darn cars and have a Champ and C/K on my wish list. I see no reason why I'd want any other marque.
                      Todd


                      63 Lark 2dr Sedan
                      64 Daytona 4dr Sedan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        When I was nine yrs. old the neighors down the road bought a brand new 49 Studebaker Land Curiser Other than my uncles new Frazer that was the only new car I had seen in the neighbor hood. He was an Insurance salesman He would give me rides to the store all the time. I always liked that car it was dark green. In 1951 he bought another new Studebaker and I thought it was greatest thing. And in 1952 he bought his wife a Commander hardtop blue over blue it was her first car. We lived about a mile and a half from 66 hiway she would drive about 5 mph to the hiway but once she got to the hiway you better watch out she would drive about 80 mph the 5 miles to town. I was born in a 1937 Plymouth. And still am a mopar nut. But have always loved them Studebakers. Some friends of ours had moved to a farm. And we were going to visit and on the way I seen a 51 Studebaker. This was the last of 1982 Well January of 83 I owned it it was just like my neighbors but a Champion Have been driving it ever since. Then came the 49 C-Cab and then a 56 Commander Sedanet and then a 48 Business coupe and then a 56 Commander Parkview.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          When I was nine yrs. old the neighors down the road bought a brand new 49 Studebaker Land Curiser Other than my uncles new Frazer that was the only new car I had seen in the neighbor hood. He was an Insurance salesman He would give me rides to the store all the time. I always liked that car it was dark green. In 1951 he bought another new Studebaker and I thought it was greatest thing. And in 1952 he bought his wife a Commander hardtop blue over blue it was her first car. We lived about a mile and a half from 66 hiway she would drive about 5 mph to the hiway but once she got to the hiway you better watch out she would drive about 80 mph the 5 miles to town. I was born in a 1937 Plymouth. And still am a mopar nut. But have always loved them Studebakers. Some friends of ours had moved to a farm. And we were going to visit and on the way I seen a 51 Studebaker. This was the last of 1982 Well January of 83 I owned it it was just like my neighbors but a Champion Have been driving it ever since. Then came the 49 C-Cab and then a 56 Commander Sedanet and then a 48 Business coupe and then a 56 Commander Parkview.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Well Matthew, that beats my THIRD generation ownership! But I may have been at it longer since I'm older than your grandpa. Just wish I had more old photos of family cars past.

                            [img] http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/63.63.jpg [/img]
                            Dwain G.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Well Matthew, that beats my THIRD generation ownership! But I may have been at it longer since I'm older than your grandpa. Just wish I had more old photos of family cars past.

                              [img] http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/63.63.jpg [/img]
                              Dwain G.

                              Comment

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