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  • '58 Sedan Delivery

    Frank Drumheller (StudeLark) sent me the following info and pictures as a follow up to our discussion on Sedan Deliverys

    Thanks, Frank!




    Dick; Thanks for offering to post pix of the '58 Scotsman Panel-wagon (sedan delivery by other manufacturers) on the thread. I have three (3) different pieces of factory literature which shows the Panel-wagon.

    # 1 & 2 photos- front and rear covers
    A single fold, 4 page folder for the factory Panel-wagon. Printing code PD 8068. This folder covers a factory assembled Panel-wagon. There are three (3) additional standard components added to a stock 2 door station wagon to create a Panel-wagon. These components were a rear dome light, a rear deck lip bridge and a pair of removable side panels. There were no changes in the model code or serial number to designate a Panel-wagon.

    # 3 photo
    A one page sheet from the sales accessories' manual for the NEW PANEL WAGON CHANGEOVER KIT. This kit was sold as an accessory so a 2 door wagon, 1958 and prior models, could be converted to a Panel Wagon (note the different nomenclature). This kit differed from the factory built Panel-wagon as the rear dome light was not included in the kit. This sheet is dated April 24, 1958, there is no printing code. Suggested dealer net price- $22.75, suggested list price- $32.50.

    # 4 photo
    On the back of the 1958 Scotsman pickup 2 page flyer is a small picture of a 1958 Panel-wagon in the bottom right corner. Printing code PD-8076.

    I learned- if it was a factory built vehicle, it was called the Panel-wagon.
    I learned- if it was owner or dealer accessorized, it was called the Panel Wagon.










    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

  • #2
    At the risk of sounding stupid...a speciality of mine...

    How did they attach the side panels?
    An earlier post said they were they made of Masonite...more to the point what's Masonite?

    63 Avanti R1 2788
    1914 Stutz Bearcat
    (George Barris replica)

    Washington State
    63 Avanti R1 2788
    1914 Stutz Bearcat
    (George Barris replica)

    Washington State

    Comment


    • #3
      At the risk of sounding stupid...a speciality of mine...

      How did they attach the side panels?
      An earlier post said they were they made of Masonite...more to the point what's Masonite?

      63 Avanti R1 2788
      1914 Stutz Bearcat
      (George Barris replica)

      Washington State
      63 Avanti R1 2788
      1914 Stutz Bearcat
      (George Barris replica)

      Washington State

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by JBOYLE
        How did they attach the side panels?
        An earlier post said they were they made of Masonite...more to the point what's Masonite?
        Here's a blow up of one of the pages Frank sent. It helps explain how they were attached, but still somewhat unclear...




        "Masonite is a type of hardboard formed using the Mason method (invented by William H. Mason) by taking wooden chips and blasting them into long fibres using steam and then forming it into boards. The boards are then pressed and heated to form the finished boards. No glue or other material is added. The long fibres give Masonite a high bending strength, tensile strength and stability."

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masonite




        Dick Steinkamp
        Bellingham, WA
        Dick Steinkamp
        Bellingham, WA

        Comment


        • #5
          quote:Originally posted by JBOYLE
          How did they attach the side panels?
          An earlier post said they were they made of Masonite...more to the point what's Masonite?
          Here's a blow up of one of the pages Frank sent. It helps explain how they were attached, but still somewhat unclear...




          "Masonite is a type of hardboard formed using the Mason method (invented by William H. Mason) by taking wooden chips and blasting them into long fibres using steam and then forming it into boards. The boards are then pressed and heated to form the finished boards. No glue or other material is added. The long fibres give Masonite a high bending strength, tensile strength and stability."

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masonite




          Dick Steinkamp
          Bellingham, WA
          Dick Steinkamp
          Bellingham, WA

          Comment


          • #6
            Masonite is pretty durable stuff. My uncle used a lot of it on his house not long ago for stucco.

            ___________________________________________

            Matthew Burnette
            Hazlehurst, Georgia
            '59 Scotsman PU
            '63 Daytona HT



            http://mbstudebaker.blogspot.com/
            http://thestudillac.blogspot.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              Masonite is pretty durable stuff. My uncle used a lot of it on his house not long ago for stucco.

              ___________________________________________

              Matthew Burnette
              Hazlehurst, Georgia
              '59 Scotsman PU
              '63 Daytona HT



              http://mbstudebaker.blogspot.com/
              http://thestudillac.blogspot.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by JBOYLE
                At the risk of sounding stupid...a speciality of mine...
                How did they attach the side panels?
                _____________________________________________________________________


                That's a good question. I've never actually seen how they are attached on a live vehicle. Somewhere, and I can't find the source, I read something about 'screws' to attach the panels. Question- to screw into what?. Hopefully, someone out in Studeland will have an answer.

                BTW, the items in the 1958 factory literature also applies to the 1959 Panel-Wagons.

                Frank Drumheller
                Louisa, VA
                '60 Lark Regal VI 4 door
                '48 M16-52 Studebaker/Boyer Fire Truck
                16-18 'junquers' on the hill


                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by JBOYLE
                  At the risk of sounding stupid...a speciality of mine...
                  How did they attach the side panels?
                  _____________________________________________________________________


                  That's a good question. I've never actually seen how they are attached on a live vehicle. Somewhere, and I can't find the source, I read something about 'screws' to attach the panels. Question- to screw into what?. Hopefully, someone out in Studeland will have an answer.

                  BTW, the items in the 1958 factory literature also applies to the 1959 Panel-Wagons.

                  Frank Drumheller
                  Louisa, VA
                  '60 Lark Regal VI 4 door
                  '48 M16-52 Studebaker/Boyer Fire Truck
                  16-18 'junquers' on the hill


                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It said on the other thread they were attached using clips.

                    David Baggett Mantachie,Ms.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It said on the other thread they were attached using clips.

                      David Baggett Mantachie,Ms.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        quote:Originally posted by stude freak

                        It said on the other thread they were attached using clips.

                        David Baggett Mantachie,Ms.
                        It sure looks like those panels are clipped to the outside of the rear windows, but any Masonite I've ever seen was pretty moisture-sensitive. It'll either warp or outright turn to mush when exposed to the weather.

                        Any Masonite I've seen has one very hard, smooth, almost glazed surface, and a surface that looks like it was impressed by window screen.

                        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          quote:Originally posted by stude freak

                          It said on the other thread they were attached using clips.

                          David Baggett Mantachie,Ms.
                          It sure looks like those panels are clipped to the outside of the rear windows, but any Masonite I've ever seen was pretty moisture-sensitive. It'll either warp or outright turn to mush when exposed to the weather.

                          Any Masonite I've seen has one very hard, smooth, almost glazed surface, and a surface that looks like it was impressed by window screen.

                          Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                          Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If someone wanted to make one of these, I would think you could use the paneling often installed in bathrooms (it's pretty much masonite with a plastocene surface) and the snaps that were used in convertibles for the boot covers and are still used for truck bed covers.

                            Brad Johnson
                            Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                            33 Rockne 10
                            51 Commander Starlight
                            53 Commander Starlight

                            previously: 63 Cruiser, 62 Regal VI, 60 VI convertible, 50 LandCruiser
                            "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                            Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                            Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                            sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If someone wanted to make one of these, I would think you could use the paneling often installed in bathrooms (it's pretty much masonite with a plastocene surface) and the snaps that were used in convertibles for the boot covers and are still used for truck bed covers.

                              Brad Johnson
                              Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                              33 Rockne 10
                              51 Commander Starlight
                              53 Commander Starlight

                              previously: 63 Cruiser, 62 Regal VI, 60 VI convertible, 50 LandCruiser
                              "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                              Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                              Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                              sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                              Comment

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