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  • Why would anyone want a Studebaker?

    Why a Studebaker? If Ya gotta ask, you'll never know.

  • #2
    Why a Studebaker? If Ya gotta ask, you'll never know.

    Comment


    • #3
      Why would anyone want a Studebaker?

      I get asked that semi-frequently by friends, family, even other old car lovers... I really had to think some to formulate an accurate answer to that question! I'd love to hear how you, my fellow Stude fans, would answer... Following is my answer:

      I am a life-long car guy; I've loved all kinds of cars. I've had them all- Camaros, Chevelles, Novas, Vettes, Mustangs, Charger/Road Runner/Super Bee, pretty much all the muscle; lots of luxury- Lincoln, Cadillac, etc., and plenty of "special interest" cars mixed in; I still love them all! But when I attend a major car show, I see row after row of muscle and street rods; all great, all the result of someone's hard work; but frankly I've gotten bored with them. When I see something that's NOT common, it naturally catches my eye! I get a kick out of Rambler, Nash, Hudson, Henry J, International, etc... I keep my eye open for the right "odd-ball" to add to my collection...

      As for Studes, I didn't have any experience or knowledge with them... but one day I happened upon a 64 Commander with a newly rebuilt engine that was in serious danger of getting crushed due to the owner having trouble with his town... car nerd that I am, I paid too much for it and brought it to the safety of my "compound"- stuck a plate on it and drove it home- 7 miles- 60 MPH- a car that hadn't been on a road in 13 years! I had intended to restore it- floors, rockers, interior, etc... did an internet search and happened upon the SDC and it's forum; and was not only welcomed, but offered lots of info and advice! In the process of researching, I learned about other Studes that I preferred over the 64; and am now working on restoring a 57 Provincial and 60 Lark simultaneously...

      As I learned about the brand, I became fascinated with the story of Studebaker, and how hard they fought against the odds to stay alive; and the crazy, kitschy, brilliant ingenuity they achived despite less and less resources... somehow, the story is part of the attraction to me...

      To summarize, the reason for my love of Studes is a combination of a number of things: Unusual cars; great, but ultimately sad, story; lots of interchange ability; large amount of used, repro, and NOS parts available; cost to buy Studes is much less, comparatively speaking, than other makes; and a fantastic pseudo-family of fellow Stude-ers!! I'm getting a lot of enjoyment learning about the ins and outs of Studes; and saving a few examples of a less-popular, yet historically important marque!

      What's your story?

      Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
      Parish, central NY 13131
      http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

      Comment


      • #4
        From the beginning, John Studebaker wanted to build a strong product that would last. "Give the customer more than you promise".
        For most of it's life the Corporation budgeted more for engineering than design. It had a reputation as Grandfather's car because Grandfather knew the value of a buck, and was willing to spend a little more for something that would be in service longer.

        Henry Ford built cheap to sell to the masses, and the previously immobile public benefited from that strategy. Chevrolet wanted to compete with Ford for the volume. William Durant consolidated the independent makes that became General Motors and instituted the yearly design change so people would want the "new" car, even though there was nothing wrong with the old one.

        All the while, Studebaker wanted stronger engines and better bearings. They even patented a new, strong, lightweight alloy called molybdenum.

        But times change, public desires change, corporate officers change and, in the end, as we know, Studebaker never went out of business; they just stopped making cars.

        They weren't all great, some had superlative style. They all had, and continue to have, a heritage. It's that heritage we honor and preserve.

        Studebaker is still in business...and we still drive them.

        Homage to my Grandfather, Lester G. Peel.

        Brad Johnson
        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
        33 Rockne 10
        51 Commander Starlight
        53 Commander Starlight

        previously: 63 Cruiser, 62 Regal VI, 60 VI convertible, 50 LandCruiser
        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
        sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

        Comment


        • #5
          From the beginning, John Studebaker wanted to build a strong product that would last. "Give the customer more than you promise".
          For most of it's life the Corporation budgeted more for engineering than design. It had a reputation as Grandfather's car because Grandfather knew the value of a buck, and was willing to spend a little more for something that would be in service longer.

          Henry Ford built cheap to sell to the masses, and the previously immobile public benefited from that strategy. Chevrolet wanted to compete with Ford for the volume. William Durant consolidated the independent makes that became General Motors and instituted the yearly design change so people would want the "new" car, even though there was nothing wrong with the old one.

          All the while, Studebaker wanted stronger engines and better bearings. They even patented a new, strong, lightweight alloy called molybdenum.

          But times change, public desires change, corporate officers change and, in the end, as we know, Studebaker never went out of business; they just stopped making cars.

          They weren't all great, some had superlative style. They all had, and continue to have, a heritage. It's that heritage we honor and preserve.

          Studebaker is still in business...and we still drive them.

          Homage to my Grandfather, Lester G. Peel.

          Brad Johnson
          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
          33 Rockne 10
          51 Commander Starlight
          53 Commander Starlight

          previously: 63 Cruiser, 62 Regal VI, 60 VI convertible, 50 LandCruiser
          "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

          Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
          sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

          Comment


          • #6
            Why do I like Studes? My grandpa drove them and my folks drove them so I guess it's something genetic. That way I don't have to take responsibility for my actions because it's not a choice, but IT'S A DISEASE!

            Comment


            • #7
              Why do I like Studes? My grandpa drove them and my folks drove them so I guess it's something genetic. That way I don't have to take responsibility for my actions because it's not a choice, but IT'S A DISEASE!

              Comment


              • #8
                Born and raised in South Bend, I didn't know any better.


                JDP
                Arnold Md.
                Studebaker On The Net
                http://stude.com
                My Ebay Items
                http://www.stude.com/EBAY/

                64 GT hawk
                63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk (Black)
                63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk (Black) #2
                63 Avanti R1
                63 Daytona convert
                63 Lark 2 door
                63 Lark 2 door #2
                62 Lark 2 door
                60 Hawk
                59 3E truck
                52 Starliner
                51 Commander

                JDP Maryland

                Comment


                • #9
                  Born and raised in South Bend, I didn't know any better.


                  JDP
                  Arnold Md.
                  Studebaker On The Net
                  http://stude.com
                  My Ebay Items
                  http://www.stude.com/EBAY/

                  64 GT hawk
                  63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk (Black)
                  63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk (Black) #2
                  63 Avanti R1
                  63 Daytona convert
                  63 Lark 2 door
                  63 Lark 2 door #2
                  62 Lark 2 door
                  60 Hawk
                  59 3E truck
                  52 Starliner
                  51 Commander

                  JDP Maryland

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My Grandfather used nothing in his demolition business but Studebaker trucks. 2-tons, 1-tons, 3/4 tons...all of them. I learned to drive on his '55 3/4 ton pickup. If you had seen what those trucks went through without ever breaking, you'd never look at any other brand of truck. My Granddad always said that if Studebaker ever quit making trucks that he'd retire...and he did. Unless the weather is inclement, I'm driving a Studebaker truck.

                    steve blake
                    http://tinyurl.com/kr3gt
                    http://tinyurl.com/l7oqh
                    steve blake...roaming the Texas Panhandle in my trusty Champ pickup
                    http://tinyurl.com/kr3gt

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My Grandfather used nothing in his demolition business but Studebaker trucks. 2-tons, 1-tons, 3/4 tons...all of them. I learned to drive on his '55 3/4 ton pickup. If you had seen what those trucks went through without ever breaking, you'd never look at any other brand of truck. My Granddad always said that if Studebaker ever quit making trucks that he'd retire...and he did. Unless the weather is inclement, I'm driving a Studebaker truck.

                      steve blake
                      http://tinyurl.com/kr3gt
                      http://tinyurl.com/l7oqh
                      steve blake...roaming the Texas Panhandle in my trusty Champ pickup
                      http://tinyurl.com/kr3gt

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I really don't have much more to add to this except; Studebakers are in my budget. I can afford the parts (almost). Even the cars. That and the club isn't snobby. Oh yes, they're there, just like any club. Still, the rank and file are the nicest people one could want to be around.

                        quote:To summarize, the reason for my love of Studes is a combination of a number of things: Unusual cars; great, but ultimately sad, story; lots of interchange ability; large amount of used, repro, and NOS parts available; cost to buy Studes is much less, comparatively speaking, than other makes; and a fantastic pseudo-family of fellow Stude-ers!! I'm getting a lot of enjoyment learning about the ins and outs of Studes; and saving a few examples of a less-popular, yet historically important marque!
                        I could'nt agree more!

                        quote:For most of it's life the Corporation budgeted more for engineering than design. It had a reputation as Grandfather's car because Grandfather knew the value of a buck, and was willing to spend a little more for something that would be in service longer.
                        And the great thing is that now they are the most reasonable! Yay!

                        I still love the cars after being acquainted with the pleasure of driving them for forty years. I just wish that it was possible to get one of mine into the condition of Grandmum's.[:X]


                        Lotsa Larks!
                        K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                        Ron Smith
                        Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                        K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                        Ron Smith
                        Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I really don't have much more to add to this except; Studebakers are in my budget. I can afford the parts (almost). Even the cars. That and the club isn't snobby. Oh yes, they're there, just like any club. Still, the rank and file are the nicest people one could want to be around.

                          quote:To summarize, the reason for my love of Studes is a combination of a number of things: Unusual cars; great, but ultimately sad, story; lots of interchange ability; large amount of used, repro, and NOS parts available; cost to buy Studes is much less, comparatively speaking, than other makes; and a fantastic pseudo-family of fellow Stude-ers!! I'm getting a lot of enjoyment learning about the ins and outs of Studes; and saving a few examples of a less-popular, yet historically important marque!
                          I could'nt agree more!

                          quote:For most of it's life the Corporation budgeted more for engineering than design. It had a reputation as Grandfather's car because Grandfather knew the value of a buck, and was willing to spend a little more for something that would be in service longer.
                          And the great thing is that now they are the most reasonable! Yay!

                          I still love the cars after being acquainted with the pleasure of driving them for forty years. I just wish that it was possible to get one of mine into the condition of Grandmum's.[:X]


                          Lotsa Larks!
                          K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                          Ron Smith
                          Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                          K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                          Ron Smith
                          Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Well, I have a Hawk because I like it's styling. That's where Studebaker excelled. I certainly don't like the engineering, frankly, it is piss-poor in a few areas. But that's no surprise, given the financial constraints the Stude engineers struggled with at the time.
                            /H

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Well, I have a Hawk because I like it's styling. That's where Studebaker excelled. I certainly don't like the engineering, frankly, it is piss-poor in a few areas. But that's no surprise, given the financial constraints the Stude engineers struggled with at the time.
                              /H

                              Comment

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