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  • #46
    I guess we all have stories about why own a Studebaker. Here is mine
    (by the way pretty new to the Forum but it is great!)
    When I was in my late 20's I was looking for an old truck, didn't really care what make. Pretty sure it was going to be the same old same old, Ford or Chevy. Looked at a couple, even dragged a trailer 350 miles to look at a Chevy that needed way too much work. Turns out my Dad, a Model T guy went to Hershey "T" parting. He calls from there one day saying he found a truck for me. How much? $3200- Man thats alot of money for someone you pay less than minimum wage to old man- Do you want it or don't you? What is it? I say. He says a 42 Studebaker p/u. What's it look like?- You'll like it, do you want the #$%& thing or not (he loves me) I'll call you back in 5 minutes make up your mind!!
    Well 18 years later I still have my baby and you couldn't pry it from me for any amount of money. Some things just don't have price tags. I overpaid for it but would do it again in a second. Kinda funny how the truck found me.

    Comment


    • #47
      I guess we all have stories about why own a Studebaker. Here is mine
      (by the way pretty new to the Forum but it is great!)
      When I was in my late 20's I was looking for an old truck, didn't really care what make. Pretty sure it was going to be the same old same old, Ford or Chevy. Looked at a couple, even dragged a trailer 350 miles to look at a Chevy that needed way too much work. Turns out my Dad, a Model T guy went to Hershey "T" parting. He calls from there one day saying he found a truck for me. How much? $3200- Man thats alot of money for someone you pay less than minimum wage to old man- Do you want it or don't you? What is it? I say. He says a 42 Studebaker p/u. What's it look like?- You'll like it, do you want the #$%& thing or not (he loves me) I'll call you back in 5 minutes make up your mind!!
      Well 18 years later I still have my baby and you couldn't pry it from me for any amount of money. Some things just don't have price tags. I overpaid for it but would do it again in a second. Kinda funny how the truck found me.

      Comment


      • #48
        Although I appreciate many brands of antique, classic, and special interest cars, the Studebaker bug bit me when I was around eight or nine years old. My 19 or 20 year old cousin had a '50 Champion four door. Unfortunately being a typical teenager, my cousin had not taken good care of the car. I was immediately fascinated by the style and the suicide doors. My cousin foolishly let me play in the car and having never seen a manual transmission car (my parents always had Chevrolets with automatic), I pushed in the clutch pedal and the car rolled. It scared the wits out of my cousin, but it was fun for a youngster of my age at the time.

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        • #49
          Although I appreciate many brands of antique, classic, and special interest cars, the Studebaker bug bit me when I was around eight or nine years old. My 19 or 20 year old cousin had a '50 Champion four door. Unfortunately being a typical teenager, my cousin had not taken good care of the car. I was immediately fascinated by the style and the suicide doors. My cousin foolishly let me play in the car and having never seen a manual transmission car (my parents always had Chevrolets with automatic), I pushed in the clutch pedal and the car rolled. It scared the wits out of my cousin, but it was fun for a youngster of my age at the time.

          Comment


          • #50
            I'm just waitin' for the part that answers the original question; why would you want a Studebaker? [)]

            Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
            Parish, central NY 13131
            http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

            Comment


            • #51
              I'm just waitin' for the part that answers the original question; why would you want a Studebaker? [)]

              Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
              Parish, central NY 13131
              http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

              Comment


              • #52
                Your story has inspiried me. My parents were Richard and Betty. They knew each other in high school. but couldnt stand each other. My mother thought my father was a snob, my father didnt like my mothere, she was the only girl in DuPoint High School that did not go out with him, spoiling his record.

                After two years in the Army, my dad came home to Charleston WV. One night in Dec. 1948, he was crusing with his buddies in a 1930 Model A Ford, looking for what 20 yr old men look for. They found a group of girls in the soda fount. My mother was sitting with her girlfriends. My father asked her out, she said,"I have a rule, I only go out with boys after they have taken me to church first." My father said, "fine but it will have to be my church, since I am head of the Sunday School." they were married three months later.

                My mother knew how to drive before my father did. My mother had access to her brothers 1939 Chrysler Royal. That is the car that they moved to Cleveland in in 1954. By 1957, we moved to the suburbs of Cleveland and Dad thought it was time to learn how to drive. He asked my mother to teach him how, my mother said no, I want to stay married to you. Call Sears and have them send a teacher. My father called Sears and asked for a driving instructor. My mother and father stood by our large front room window, when a 1957 Studebaker Champion pulled into our driveway. Dad said, "out stepped Miss Fine, 38-23-36, in a tailored suit and heels." My dad had the ability to guess a womens measurments to the inch. My mother turned to my father and said,"dont enjoy this, you will take three lessons, thats it."

                Dad bought his first car soon after that:
                1953 Plymouth Cranebrook Hardtop
                1960 Ford Galaxie Town Sedan
                1964 Falcon Sprint Hardtop with 260 V8 and Fourspeed.
                1968 Ford Galaxie Hardtop Coupe.
                1968 Ford Fairlane Hardtop Coupe
                1974 Ford Galaxie Hardtop Sedan
                1977 Mercury Grand Marquis.

                Just thought that you might enjoy reading this post.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Your story has inspiried me. My parents were Richard and Betty. They knew each other in high school. but couldnt stand each other. My mother thought my father was a snob, my father didnt like my mothere, she was the only girl in DuPoint High School that did not go out with him, spoiling his record.

                  After two years in the Army, my dad came home to Charleston WV. One night in Dec. 1948, he was crusing with his buddies in a 1930 Model A Ford, looking for what 20 yr old men look for. They found a group of girls in the soda fount. My mother was sitting with her girlfriends. My father asked her out, she said,"I have a rule, I only go out with boys after they have taken me to church first." My father said, "fine but it will have to be my church, since I am head of the Sunday School." they were married three months later.

                  My mother knew how to drive before my father did. My mother had access to her brothers 1939 Chrysler Royal. That is the car that they moved to Cleveland in in 1954. By 1957, we moved to the suburbs of Cleveland and Dad thought it was time to learn how to drive. He asked my mother to teach him how, my mother said no, I want to stay married to you. Call Sears and have them send a teacher. My father called Sears and asked for a driving instructor. My mother and father stood by our large front room window, when a 1957 Studebaker Champion pulled into our driveway. Dad said, "out stepped Miss Fine, 38-23-36, in a tailored suit and heels." My dad had the ability to guess a womens measurments to the inch. My mother turned to my father and said,"dont enjoy this, you will take three lessons, thats it."

                  Dad bought his first car soon after that:
                  1953 Plymouth Cranebrook Hardtop
                  1960 Ford Galaxie Town Sedan
                  1964 Falcon Sprint Hardtop with 260 V8 and Fourspeed.
                  1968 Ford Galaxie Hardtop Coupe.
                  1968 Ford Fairlane Hardtop Coupe
                  1974 Ford Galaxie Hardtop Sedan
                  1977 Mercury Grand Marquis.

                  Just thought that you might enjoy reading this post.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    quote: I'm just waitin' for the part that answers the original question; why would you want a Studebaker?

                    Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                    There is no simple answer to that question. Many of us don't know why we want a Studebaker. We don't even think about it until we have to explain it to someone and then the best answer is the one that bikers use. "If you have to ask why, you wouldn't understand". Why does our heart start beating faster when we see one, and why do we want to spend our hard earned money on them?

                    In my case it all stemmed from my experiences growing up. When I drive my Studebaker, I feel like I am 16 again and only have to worry about what my friends will think of my car. There were times when I was growing up that I didn't want to drive a Studebaker. I was the only kid in my high school that drove a Studebaker and sometimes, I just wanted to fit in with the crowd. I bought a 55 Chevy and a 56 Ford, but I just felt that they were like an appliance, not something that I had put my heart and soul into. My Grandfather's and my Mother's love of Studebakers had an enormous effect on me. I was aware of Studebakers at a very early age. I had a lot invested in Studebakers, I even wrote a term paper in school titled "Through the Years, Studebaker and Packard make the best vehicles".

                    Of course, owning the only Studebaker at school put me in the position of having to race a lot of other cars. I had to prove that Studebakers would run. We had a lot of informal stop light races. My favorite one to beat was a friend's 58 Ford that he claimed had 300 horse power.

                    I owned some muscle cars in the 60s like a 67 Oldsmobile 442 that I bought new, but I just didn't love it like I did my Studebakers. Maybe Studebaker being the underdog, made me feel more of a part of them.

                    A strong club like we have also helps. I know that there are people in the club who feel like I do, and will enjoy looking at and talking about Studebakers. It makes you feel like you are part of a big family and we have squabbles, like families do, but we have a common interest that holds us together.


                    Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      quote: I'm just waitin' for the part that answers the original question; why would you want a Studebaker?

                      Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                      There is no simple answer to that question. Many of us don't know why we want a Studebaker. We don't even think about it until we have to explain it to someone and then the best answer is the one that bikers use. "If you have to ask why, you wouldn't understand". Why does our heart start beating faster when we see one, and why do we want to spend our hard earned money on them?

                      In my case it all stemmed from my experiences growing up. When I drive my Studebaker, I feel like I am 16 again and only have to worry about what my friends will think of my car. There were times when I was growing up that I didn't want to drive a Studebaker. I was the only kid in my high school that drove a Studebaker and sometimes, I just wanted to fit in with the crowd. I bought a 55 Chevy and a 56 Ford, but I just felt that they were like an appliance, not something that I had put my heart and soul into. My Grandfather's and my Mother's love of Studebakers had an enormous effect on me. I was aware of Studebakers at a very early age. I had a lot invested in Studebakers, I even wrote a term paper in school titled "Through the Years, Studebaker and Packard make the best vehicles".

                      Of course, owning the only Studebaker at school put me in the position of having to race a lot of other cars. I had to prove that Studebakers would run. We had a lot of informal stop light races. My favorite one to beat was a friend's 58 Ford that he claimed had 300 horse power.

                      I owned some muscle cars in the 60s like a 67 Oldsmobile 442 that I bought new, but I just didn't love it like I did my Studebakers. Maybe Studebaker being the underdog, made me feel more of a part of them.

                      A strong club like we have also helps. I know that there are people in the club who feel like I do, and will enjoy looking at and talking about Studebakers. It makes you feel like you are part of a big family and we have squabbles, like families do, but we have a common interest that holds us together.


                      Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        I heard that men fall in love with their eyes. I guess I'm a typical man because I fell in love with the Studebakers because I like the way they look!

                        GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          I heard that men fall in love with their eyes. I guess I'm a typical man because I fell in love with the Studebakers because I like the way they look!

                          GARY H 2DR.SEDAN 48 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION NORTHEAST MD.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Ok Bams here is my Studie Story.
                            I like you am a life long gear head. I have been building and racing cars since the early 70's. I have had countless muscle cars and still have a Chevelle, GMC Srint, Mach 1 and a few other Hot Rods.
                            We live in Colorado and every labor day we take vacation to the black hills in South Dakota. It was about 4 years ago we were in Custer South Dakota and it happened that the South Dakota Chapter of the SDC was there for there annual Labor Day Event. Of course I had to check it out and after looking at those cool studebakers and talking to the SDC members I was hooked! Shortly after that I came upon a 60 Lark parked on a front lawn with a for sale sign. That turned out to be my first Studebaker. Then a 63 Hawk and soon after that A 50 Champ that we did a total restoration on.
                            I agree with you Bams about going to the car shows and seeing the same type cars, but when we show our 50 Champ it draws a crowd. I do like being different and searching for parts and reading the forum here from other SDC members on how these great cars tick.
                            I take my Hawk out for a drive and stop for gas and people always come up to me with a comment like "Have not seen one of those in a long time" or "I had a uncle that had a studebaker"
                            I can take out my 500 hp pro street Chevelle and I get "turn that noisy thing off!"
                            Hey maybe I am getting old but I enjoy driving my Hawk whenever I can.
                            Made it to Omaha and plan on going to South Bend and now we always go to South Dakota to the chapter labor day meet. Yes I quess I like being different at least where I live and owning 3 studebakers. I think 3 is enuff for right now because now I am getting more odd since we are now restoring an Edsel!!

                            Rick
                            Wellington Colorado
                            www.wellingtonclassics.com

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Ok Bams here is my Studie Story.
                              I like you am a life long gear head. I have been building and racing cars since the early 70's. I have had countless muscle cars and still have a Chevelle, GMC Srint, Mach 1 and a few other Hot Rods.
                              We live in Colorado and every labor day we take vacation to the black hills in South Dakota. It was about 4 years ago we were in Custer South Dakota and it happened that the South Dakota Chapter of the SDC was there for there annual Labor Day Event. Of course I had to check it out and after looking at those cool studebakers and talking to the SDC members I was hooked! Shortly after that I came upon a 60 Lark parked on a front lawn with a for sale sign. That turned out to be my first Studebaker. Then a 63 Hawk and soon after that A 50 Champ that we did a total restoration on.
                              I agree with you Bams about going to the car shows and seeing the same type cars, but when we show our 50 Champ it draws a crowd. I do like being different and searching for parts and reading the forum here from other SDC members on how these great cars tick.
                              I take my Hawk out for a drive and stop for gas and people always come up to me with a comment like "Have not seen one of those in a long time" or "I had a uncle that had a studebaker"
                              I can take out my 500 hp pro street Chevelle and I get "turn that noisy thing off!"
                              Hey maybe I am getting old but I enjoy driving my Hawk whenever I can.
                              Made it to Omaha and plan on going to South Bend and now we always go to South Dakota to the chapter labor day meet. Yes I quess I like being different at least where I live and owning 3 studebakers. I think 3 is enuff for right now because now I am getting more odd since we are now restoring an Edsel!!

                              Rick
                              Wellington Colorado
                              www.wellingtonclassics.com

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                [u]COMING DOWN WITH STUDEITIS </u>: by Frank Drumheller
                                Edited from an article in THE STUDEBAKER MENU, newsletter of the Greater Virginia Chapter, SDC, Vol. 20, No. 3, May-June, 2005

                                Oh, I've had the disease for a long time. A fascination with cars and trucks captivated me as early as my fifth year. For whatever reason, I seemed to be drawn to the name and models of the vehicles belonging to my family. The first vehicle I recall is the family 1935 Plymouth sedan that died in late-1942. I remember vividly my father bringing home an almost new 1941 Chevrolet Coupe in early 1943. He had paid a fellow worker more than the car sold for new just two years earlier. My Dad was fortunate to buy this coupe, as we had no family transportation for a number of months in those dark days of WWII. We lived in rural Augusta County (VA) and Dad was tired of walking miles to catch a ride to Waynesboro (VA) every working day on a swing-shift schedule at DuPont. Folks did what they had to do during the depth of the war.

                                In the late 1940's, a cousin taught me the difference between a '47 and a '48 Chevrolet. That set me to learning the make and year of every car and truck that I saw. By 1951, I could tell you the brand, model, year, type of engine, cubic inches and hosepower of every car and many trucks on the road. That was the time I began visiting every dealership I could and carrying away free literature which I read over and over. If I had studeid my lessions as well as I memorized car brochures, I might have amounted to something!! I still have all those brochures boxed in our basement and attic.

                                My first remembered encounter with a Studebaker was in the early spring of 1947. The morning's 'Little Recess' bell had rung. Two of my fourth grade buddies and I ran out the school's front door when we were shocked to a screeching halt. There sat a new 1947 Studebaker Starlight Coupe in medium blue at the end of the walkway. Never had I seen such a fantastic automobile. So help me, my friend on the right blurted out, "Which way is it going?" I've never forgotten the moment or the Studebaker. There has always been a soft-spot in my heart for Studebakers ever since because they were 'different'.

                                My first car was another 1941 Chevrolet Coupe, purchased in 1955 following my freshman year at college. A 1951 Mercury sedan then replaced the Chevy and lasted three years to see me graduate from college and through my first year of teaching. I entereed the 1960's with a 1955 Plymouth V8, as my attention was now drawn to antique cars. Still no Studebaker's, as my first antique car was a 1930 Model A Ford bought in 1959. The Model A didn't last long as the first two antique car shows I attended had more Model A's than antique cars! Man, was I disappointed. I wanted somthing unique, different. The A was sold and a 1930 Marquette sedan took it's place (I still own the Marquette). Then the Kaiser-Frazer bug bit me. I bought a 1951 Frazer Manhattan 4 door convertible (only 156 built), several Kaiser part cars including an Allstate. After seven years teaching in elementary and high schools, I did without cars for several years as I spent a two year team with the Peace Corps in Turkey in the mid-60's.

                                When I returned to the States in 1967, I accepted a job in Louisa County in school administration and began my Master's program at the University of Virginia. I continued my antique car hobby by purchasing a 1947 Frazer Manhattan sedan and a 1948 Buick Roadmaster fastback that same year. During this period of the '60's, my daily drivers ranged from a 1961 Corvair coupe, a 1954 Buick Century hardtop, to a 1958 Cadillac coupe, but still no Studebakers.

                                A younger brother was the first Studebaker owner in my family. While I was surviving with the '51 Mercury, Brother Ray bought a 1951 Studebaker Commander convertible, maroon with a red leather interior and overdrive. It was worn out and would blow oil all over the front sheet metal while running down the local Fords and my Mercury, but it earned its keep. Sometime later,

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