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  • #31
    I was just a little kid when I got hooked on Studebakers. Gering, Nebraska was the Ford-GM and occasional Chrysler capitol of the planet, it seems, in the late 1960s but one neighbor had a 1953 Loewy coupe that was salmon in color and not running. He let us kids play in it. From that day forward...I was probably 8 or 9 at the time...I loved Studebakers. My folks couldn't understand it. "Just like Ramblers but maybe not as ugly" was their crushing comment. From that time until now I have loved Studebakers. I truly like most cars but my heart belongs to the product from South Bend.

    Studedude1961
    --1963 Cruiser

    Comment


    • #32
      My father was a Hudson man and thought I would follow till I was in high school and saw a 54 p/u our star basketball player owned. Shortly after I joined the service I got a 55 Commander. That was in '62 and while driving it down the highway a car that I have never seen before went fying by. I found at a dealer in town. It was a brand new Avanti. I had to have one. Years later I purchased a '53 p/u that I daly drove for 12 years. That kept Studebaker in my blood till I was finally able to get that Avanti (38 yaers past). Two of my sons now have Studes. Once you get the taste you can't get away.
      I also agree that the Studebaker people are the best!

      Alan

      Comment


      • #33
        My father was a Hudson man and thought I would follow till I was in high school and saw a 54 p/u our star basketball player owned. Shortly after I joined the service I got a 55 Commander. That was in '62 and while driving it down the highway a car that I have never seen before went fying by. I found at a dealer in town. It was a brand new Avanti. I had to have one. Years later I purchased a '53 p/u that I daly drove for 12 years. That kept Studebaker in my blood till I was finally able to get that Avanti (38 yaers past). Two of my sons now have Studes. Once you get the taste you can't get away.
        I also agree that the Studebaker people are the best!

        Alan

        Comment


        • #34
          My Studebaker story started before I was born, when my Grandfather traded his 38 Buick for a 42 Studebaker Commander in the fall of 1941. He was a drug store inspector for the state of Virginia and so he was able to get gas to drive his Studebaker all through the war. He liked the Studebaker so much, he bought stock in the company. He traded the 42 for a 47 Land Cruiser. They lived at the edge of a small town, and my Grandmother told me that country people would stop at their house and ask if they could just look at their car. He traded the 47 for a 50 Commander. He also talked three of his children into buying Studebakers in 1950. My parents were one of them. I had broken my leg when a barn door fell on me in 1950 and my parents took me to the hospital, that was 25 miles away, in their 40 Chevrolet. We lived in a rural area of eastern Virginia and there were lots of dirt roads. My Mother said the trip was very bumpy and I was in pain all the way to the hospital. She told my father that she wanted a new car to bring me home from the hospital. My Father wanted a Chevy but my Mother and Grandfather talked him into a Studebaker. They bought a green 50 Champion. My Father died of cancer in 1952 and my Mother traded the 50 for a 53 Champion.

          A neighbor of ours also bought a 53 Studebaker, but unlike the 4 door sedan that my Mother bought, it was a Commander hardtop, dark blue over light blue with whitewalls and full wheel covers. I was only 8 years old, but I thought it was the most beautiful car I had ever seen. I used to stand at our driveway and wait for him to come home from work, so I could just look at his car.

          In 1958 when I was 13, my Mother was ready, with my prodding, to buy a new car. The salesman from Pence-Briggs Studebaker brought out a 58 Champion 4 door sedan for her to see. It was white with a black top, single headlights in dual pods and dog dish hub caps. I thought it was the ugliest car I had ever seen and I made it known. The salesman realized that he had to please me to sell a car to my Mother, so he took the car back and a few days later brought out a 58 Silver Hawk. It was white with gold fins and had a 289 V8 with a 4 barrel carburetor. I was ecstatic. I made all kinds of promises and my Mother bought the car. It was the happiest day of my life. I learned to drive on that car, and my best friend and I spent many happy hours in that car.

          In 1961, I bought my first Studebaker for $75.00. It was a green 53 Commander hardtop. Even though it was only 8 years old, it was very rusty. I started taking it apart and was planning to put a Chevy engine in it. I had it scattered all over the back yard for several years until one day I came home from school and it was gone. My Mother paid a junk man to haul it away. I had several other Studebakers and other brands, but then bought a real nice 62 GT Hawk with 18,000 miles in 1965 for $1,060.00. I drove it for two years and then made a huge mistake. My best friend and I were riding around one Saturday night looking at the new cars. We wanted to see the new Camaro which had just come out. We weren't impressed with it and so we went to the Ford dealer. They had a Cobra in the showroom next to a new 67 Mustang 2+2. I was looking at the Mustang and the salesman kept telling me that he could put me in it that night. Like a fool, I traded my Hawk for it. I drove it around all day Sunday and I was never so disappointed in a car in my life. I took it back to the dealer on Monday afternoon and told them that I wanted my Hawk back. They said that one of their mechanics had already bought it and he wasn't about to give it back. That was the last Studebaker I owned until I bought a 55 Commander hardtop in 1982.


          Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

          Comment


          • #35
            My Studebaker story started before I was born, when my Grandfather traded his 38 Buick for a 42 Studebaker Commander in the fall of 1941. He was a drug store inspector for the state of Virginia and so he was able to get gas to drive his Studebaker all through the war. He liked the Studebaker so much, he bought stock in the company. He traded the 42 for a 47 Land Cruiser. They lived at the edge of a small town, and my Grandmother told me that country people would stop at their house and ask if they could just look at their car. He traded the 47 for a 50 Commander. He also talked three of his children into buying Studebakers in 1950. My parents were one of them. I had broken my leg when a barn door fell on me in 1950 and my parents took me to the hospital, that was 25 miles away, in their 40 Chevrolet. We lived in a rural area of eastern Virginia and there were lots of dirt roads. My Mother said the trip was very bumpy and I was in pain all the way to the hospital. She told my father that she wanted a new car to bring me home from the hospital. My Father wanted a Chevy but my Mother and Grandfather talked him into a Studebaker. They bought a green 50 Champion. My Father died of cancer in 1952 and my Mother traded the 50 for a 53 Champion.

            A neighbor of ours also bought a 53 Studebaker, but unlike the 4 door sedan that my Mother bought, it was a Commander hardtop, dark blue over light blue with whitewalls and full wheel covers. I was only 8 years old, but I thought it was the most beautiful car I had ever seen. I used to stand at our driveway and wait for him to come home from work, so I could just look at his car.

            In 1958 when I was 13, my Mother was ready, with my prodding, to buy a new car. The salesman from Pence-Briggs Studebaker brought out a 58 Champion 4 door sedan for her to see. It was white with a black top, single headlights in dual pods and dog dish hub caps. I thought it was the ugliest car I had ever seen and I made it known. The salesman realized that he had to please me to sell a car to my Mother, so he took the car back and a few days later brought out a 58 Silver Hawk. It was white with gold fins and had a 289 V8 with a 4 barrel carburetor. I was ecstatic. I made all kinds of promises and my Mother bought the car. It was the happiest day of my life. I learned to drive on that car, and my best friend and I spent many happy hours in that car.

            In 1961, I bought my first Studebaker for $75.00. It was a green 53 Commander hardtop. Even though it was only 8 years old, it was very rusty. I started taking it apart and was planning to put a Chevy engine in it. I had it scattered all over the back yard for several years until one day I came home from school and it was gone. My Mother paid a junk man to haul it away. I had several other Studebakers and other brands, but then bought a real nice 62 GT Hawk with 18,000 miles in 1965 for $1,060.00. I drove it for two years and then made a huge mistake. My best friend and I were riding around one Saturday night looking at the new cars. We wanted to see the new Camaro which had just come out. We weren't impressed with it and so we went to the Ford dealer. They had a Cobra in the showroom next to a new 67 Mustang 2+2. I was looking at the Mustang and the salesman kept telling me that he could put me in it that night. Like a fool, I traded my Hawk for it. I drove it around all day Sunday and I was never so disappointed in a car in my life. I took it back to the dealer on Monday afternoon and told them that I wanted my Hawk back. They said that one of their mechanics had already bought it and he wasn't about to give it back. That was the last Studebaker I owned until I bought a 55 Commander hardtop in 1982.


            Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

            Comment


            • #36
              Well my story revolves around what the family used to do to take a trip when we had a 1934 Plymouth. Dad went through the routine of kicking the tires, checking the water, and the oil, and putting a gallon of gas in the trunk along with a gallon of water for the radiator in case that OLD PLYMOUTH started heating up. We packed a lunch in case we got stranded on the road, and then Mom and Dad and my older brother got in the front seat, and my sister, and younger brother and myself got in the rear seat, and we hit the road for that elusive trip which in all reality was no futher than 25 miles away to Greensboro, N.C. On one occasion, that 34 Plymouth broke down and we wound up walking about a quarter of a mile to a resturant where we waited for a trailways bus to come along, and we flagged down the bus for a ride to the Burlington, NC trailways bus terminal. We walked from the bus terminal back to our home, which was about a mile from the bus station. That was the incident that drove my Dad into finding a Plain Jane car such as a 50 Studebaker Champion with 4 doors. That overdrive transmission was something that drove my Pop into action and something that he bragged about when he pressed the gas pedal down and it changed into that PASSING gear. WOW! all 85 horses of power, and we thought it was great then, and hopefully I will soon get that feeling again (I'm still into resto work on my 50 four door Champion) WHAT? What'cha mean, we are going to the beach?
              Wow! That's 200 miles away. None of us young'uns had ever gone that far from home before. We all got into the Studebaker in August, when it was hot in the Piedmont section of North Carolina. Dad opened up the side fender vents and showed us the Air Conditioner he had discovered, and with that passing gear we were in tall cotton. I was 9 years old, my younger brother was 7, my sister was 11, and my older brother was 13. My older brother got to sit in the front seat with Mom & Pop. The Plain Jane Studebaker didn't have a radio, so we had to entertain ourselves on the first real trip from home. It didn't take long for us to start the asking part of, "Are we there yet?" or "How much futher is it?", and that started about the time we got to Apex, N.C. which was 140 miles from Carolina Beach, so we had quite a ways to go yet. We got down in the sandhills section of North Carolina, and the roadside fruit stands got our attention, until we couldn't stand it any longer. Pop pulled over and we all had to carry a watermelon in our laps for the next 75 miles. we went over the Cape Fear River wheich is between Wilmington, and Carolina Beach, and Mom gave us a challenge for the first person to spot the ocean would get a piece of Chocolate Cake and a Pepsi when we got to the beach. I had no idea of what I was suppose to spot, but I was looking just the same. I lost out on that challenge. My older brother spotted the Atlantic Ocean first, and he got the slice of Chocolate cake, and Pepsi, but he wasn't suppose to eat stuff like that since he was a diabetic, but gobble gobble he went just the same.
              I know this is a boring story, but it is a trip that I will never forget, and that Aqua Green four door Studebaker Champion created the change in our lifestyle that was for the better. Now yaw might understand why it is that I am restoring my 50 Champion. Gonna take another trip to the beach when I get her done, and the 67 Red Charger (muscle car) and the 59 Impala straight gear 348 tri-power Convertible will remain at home while I re-live a happy time in my life, minus my Mom & Pop and older brother.

              Don Dodson

              Comment


              • #37
                Well my story revolves around what the family used to do to take a trip when we had a 1934 Plymouth. Dad went through the routine of kicking the tires, checking the water, and the oil, and putting a gallon of gas in the trunk along with a gallon of water for the radiator in case that OLD PLYMOUTH started heating up. We packed a lunch in case we got stranded on the road, and then Mom and Dad and my older brother got in the front seat, and my sister, and younger brother and myself got in the rear seat, and we hit the road for that elusive trip which in all reality was no futher than 25 miles away to Greensboro, N.C. On one occasion, that 34 Plymouth broke down and we wound up walking about a quarter of a mile to a resturant where we waited for a trailways bus to come along, and we flagged down the bus for a ride to the Burlington, NC trailways bus terminal. We walked from the bus terminal back to our home, which was about a mile from the bus station. That was the incident that drove my Dad into finding a Plain Jane car such as a 50 Studebaker Champion with 4 doors. That overdrive transmission was something that drove my Pop into action and something that he bragged about when he pressed the gas pedal down and it changed into that PASSING gear. WOW! all 85 horses of power, and we thought it was great then, and hopefully I will soon get that feeling again (I'm still into resto work on my 50 four door Champion) WHAT? What'cha mean, we are going to the beach?
                Wow! That's 200 miles away. None of us young'uns had ever gone that far from home before. We all got into the Studebaker in August, when it was hot in the Piedmont section of North Carolina. Dad opened up the side fender vents and showed us the Air Conditioner he had discovered, and with that passing gear we were in tall cotton. I was 9 years old, my younger brother was 7, my sister was 11, and my older brother was 13. My older brother got to sit in the front seat with Mom & Pop. The Plain Jane Studebaker didn't have a radio, so we had to entertain ourselves on the first real trip from home. It didn't take long for us to start the asking part of, "Are we there yet?" or "How much futher is it?", and that started about the time we got to Apex, N.C. which was 140 miles from Carolina Beach, so we had quite a ways to go yet. We got down in the sandhills section of North Carolina, and the roadside fruit stands got our attention, until we couldn't stand it any longer. Pop pulled over and we all had to carry a watermelon in our laps for the next 75 miles. we went over the Cape Fear River wheich is between Wilmington, and Carolina Beach, and Mom gave us a challenge for the first person to spot the ocean would get a piece of Chocolate Cake and a Pepsi when we got to the beach. I had no idea of what I was suppose to spot, but I was looking just the same. I lost out on that challenge. My older brother spotted the Atlantic Ocean first, and he got the slice of Chocolate cake, and Pepsi, but he wasn't suppose to eat stuff like that since he was a diabetic, but gobble gobble he went just the same.
                I know this is a boring story, but it is a trip that I will never forget, and that Aqua Green four door Studebaker Champion created the change in our lifestyle that was for the better. Now yaw might understand why it is that I am restoring my 50 Champion. Gonna take another trip to the beach when I get her done, and the 67 Red Charger (muscle car) and the 59 Impala straight gear 348 tri-power Convertible will remain at home while I re-live a happy time in my life, minus my Mom & Pop and older brother.

                Don Dodson

                Comment


                • #38



                  Why own a Studebaker???? Anyone can own and restore a Ford or Chevy. Every part needed right out of a catalog, brand new, delivered to your home, ready to bolt on. I'd much rather spend a whole day slogging through a swap meet to come up with one bent hubcap (that doesn't even fit my car[:0], but hey--it's for a Stude--I think. Of course I'd rather spend three days trying to get brake drums off of tapered axles! Don't you like your pride and joy being mistaken for Ramblers, etc.? "No. Really, who made it?" "289? Yeah, that's just a Ford engine!"[V] "How come they don't make 'em today?" Oh, they do (in Canada.
                  What fun!

                  KURTRUK
                  (read it backwards)
                  KURTRUK
                  (read it backwards)




                  Nothing is politically right which is morally wrong. -A. Lincoln

                  Comment


                  • #39



                    Why own a Studebaker???? Anyone can own and restore a Ford or Chevy. Every part needed right out of a catalog, brand new, delivered to your home, ready to bolt on. I'd much rather spend a whole day slogging through a swap meet to come up with one bent hubcap (that doesn't even fit my car[:0], but hey--it's for a Stude--I think. Of course I'd rather spend three days trying to get brake drums off of tapered axles! Don't you like your pride and joy being mistaken for Ramblers, etc.? "No. Really, who made it?" "289? Yeah, that's just a Ford engine!"[V] "How come they don't make 'em today?" Oh, they do (in Canada.
                    What fun!

                    KURTRUK
                    (read it backwards)
                    KURTRUK
                    (read it backwards)




                    Nothing is politically right which is morally wrong. -A. Lincoln

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Some great stories, esp. Leonard and Don- that's the type of thing I was hoping for! [^]

                      Keep 'em coming!

                      P.S. to the long-timers- Dick Steinkamp, Biggs and JDP in particular: I'd love to hear about your early days in the Stude world if you'd be willing to write about them <poke> <prod>

                      Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                      Parish, central NY 13131
                      http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Some great stories, esp. Leonard and Don- that's the type of thing I was hoping for! [^]

                        Keep 'em coming!

                        P.S. to the long-timers- Dick Steinkamp, Biggs and JDP in particular: I'd love to hear about your early days in the Stude world if you'd be willing to write about them <poke> <prod>

                        Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                        Parish, central NY 13131
                        http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          I've told this story before, here it is again:

                          My first Stude didn't belong to me. It was my Mum's. She had inherited it from my grandmum who had bought it six months before she died. The car had six hundred fifty miles on the odometer when it was parked in the barn, put up on blocks, and covered with a tarp. Mum said; "I don't want to ever see that eyesore of a Studeclunker again." And she meant it. Mum wanted the Pierce Arrow and Dad wouldn't hear of it. He felt that a brand new car was stupid to pass up. What was it? Grandmum's car was a Robin's egg blue Lark Regal Wagon. The interior was blue and white. I thought it was the most beautiful thing on four wheels.
                          The car sat in the barn four years till I entered eigth grade. There was no transportation to Red Bluff so I could attend school. Mum arranged for me to get a Limited use youth rural driving permit. At least that's what I think they called it. In a nutshell, I was allowed to drive a set pattern between school and home. The Sheriff allowed me to carry passengers as long as I didn't leave HWY 36. So here I was at the ripe old age of eleven driving what was basically a brand new car. I loved that car. When the school year was over the car went back up on blocks and under the tarp.
                          My dad died in 1972 and Mum sold the ranch eighteen months later. The car was still in the barn with it's pink slip signed. I begged her for that car. She wouldn't relent. When last I saw the car, in 1972, it still looked new. The mothballs had kept the mice at bay and the paint looked great under the dust. So as far as I know, it's still up on Mt. Lassen at El Rancho Seis Pinos under that tarp. I hope...

                          The first Stude that I've owned is now in southern Oregon. It had been sitting in a field for seventeen years when a friend of mine loaded it up and took it home. I had discussed the car with him several times and had seen it in the field. He said that it would be running the next weekend. I told him he was nuts. No car that sat in a field for seventeen years would run without considerable work. Further if it did, I would buy it from him. Well, I owned it for six years before giving it and the Blue Witch away. I still have five Studes, though I'm looking for homes for two. Sometimes at night the wind in the pine and fir trees sound like the cars are whispering stories to each other...


                          Lotsa Larks!
                          K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                          Ron Smith
                          Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                          K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                          Ron Smith
                          Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            I've told this story before, here it is again:

                            My first Stude didn't belong to me. It was my Mum's. She had inherited it from my grandmum who had bought it six months before she died. The car had six hundred fifty miles on the odometer when it was parked in the barn, put up on blocks, and covered with a tarp. Mum said; "I don't want to ever see that eyesore of a Studeclunker again." And she meant it. Mum wanted the Pierce Arrow and Dad wouldn't hear of it. He felt that a brand new car was stupid to pass up. What was it? Grandmum's car was a Robin's egg blue Lark Regal Wagon. The interior was blue and white. I thought it was the most beautiful thing on four wheels.
                            The car sat in the barn four years till I entered eigth grade. There was no transportation to Red Bluff so I could attend school. Mum arranged for me to get a Limited use youth rural driving permit. At least that's what I think they called it. In a nutshell, I was allowed to drive a set pattern between school and home. The Sheriff allowed me to carry passengers as long as I didn't leave HWY 36. So here I was at the ripe old age of eleven driving what was basically a brand new car. I loved that car. When the school year was over the car went back up on blocks and under the tarp.
                            My dad died in 1972 and Mum sold the ranch eighteen months later. The car was still in the barn with it's pink slip signed. I begged her for that car. She wouldn't relent. When last I saw the car, in 1972, it still looked new. The mothballs had kept the mice at bay and the paint looked great under the dust. So as far as I know, it's still up on Mt. Lassen at El Rancho Seis Pinos under that tarp. I hope...

                            The first Stude that I've owned is now in southern Oregon. It had been sitting in a field for seventeen years when a friend of mine loaded it up and took it home. I had discussed the car with him several times and had seen it in the field. He said that it would be running the next weekend. I told him he was nuts. No car that sat in a field for seventeen years would run without considerable work. Further if it did, I would buy it from him. Well, I owned it for six years before giving it and the Blue Witch away. I still have five Studes, though I'm looking for homes for two. Sometimes at night the wind in the pine and fir trees sound like the cars are whispering stories to each other...


                            Lotsa Larks!
                            K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                            Ron Smith
                            Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                            K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                            Ron Smith
                            Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

                              Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

                              Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
                              Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                              The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                              �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                              For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                              "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

                                Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

                                Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
                                Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                                The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                                �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                                For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                                "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

                                Comment

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