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Last of the Studebaker wagons

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  • Last of the Studebaker wagons

    I found this article to interesting not to share it with you.

    The Kentucky Studebaker....

    http://www.farmcollector.com/Farm-li...tudebaker.aspx

  • #2
    Cool read. Thank you for posting.



    Gary Sanders
    Nixa, MO
    President Toy Studebaker Collectors Club. Have an interest in Toy Studebakers? Contact me for details.
    Gary Sanders
    Nixa, MO

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    • #3
      Very interesting I enjoyed the article. Glad you posted it.


      7G-Q1 49 2R12 10G-F5 56B-D4 56B-F2
      Middle Tennessee 37th Annual Car Show April 4 2009

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      • #4
        Very interesting! In my neck o' the woods,the old farm wagons are popular as yard ornaments. Someday I'd like to make a photo album of them. I can find about 50,in various conditions,in probably a 15 mile radius of my house. My favorite is a very delapidated one,looks like if you tried to move it,it would fall apart. Every time I see one,I wonder if it might be a Studebaker....


        Oglesby,Il.
        " He's not happy unless there's some piece of $#%& in the driveway to work on"
        Oglesby,Il.

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        • #5
          Pretty cool, I think I will print this off and hang it on my shop wall.

          Dylan Wills

          '61 lark deluxe 4 door wagon
          Dylan Wills
          Everett, Wa.


          1961 Lark 4 door wagon
          1961 Lark 4 door wagon #2 (Wife's car!)
          1955 VW Beetle (Went to the dark side)
          1914 Ford Model T

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          • #6
            Thank You

            "I know nothing"

            Sargent Schultz

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            • #7
              THANKS for that posting.

              And it was timely. I was recently thinking that there has been no exploration of the "Studebakers" that Kentucky Wagon was authorized to build. I'm going to have to print off that article.

              Roger "153624" Hill

              55 Champion
              47 M-5
              Izzer Buggy
              Junior Wagon
              Roger Hill


              60 Lark Vlll, hardtop, black/red, Power Kit, 3 spd. - "Juliette"
              61 Champ Deluxe, 6, black/red, o/d, long box. - "Jeri"
              Junior Wagon - "Junior"

              "In the end, dear undertaker,
              Ride me in a Studebaker"

              Comment


              • #8
                Great read! I really hate seeing old farm wagons used as "Yard Art." The reason is that you know they are simply decaying in the weather. Several years ago, a used car lot in my town had a Studebaker goat wagon on top of their office. I tried to buy it but the owner said that the "man who put it there had died and it was going to stay there forever." Two days later a bad storm blew it off and nothing was left but the hardware.

                John Clary
                Greer, SC

                I have only two limitations ...BRAINS & ENERGY
                SDC member since 1975
                John Clary
                Greer, SC

                SDC member since 1975

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                • #9
                  Thanks, that was fascinating.

                  It sounds like Studebaker did much the same thing with their wagon business as they did many years later with the auto business.

                  Jeff DeWitt
                  http://carolinastudes.net
                  Jeff DeWitt
                  http://carolinastudes.net

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                  • #10
                    I addressed this same article over on the Stude Truck Talk forum on April 08. A bit of good conversation/comments followed.

                    http://www.network54.com/Forum/23885...cky+Studebaker

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                    • #11
                      I hear the Studebakers had certain distinguishable design work on the iron for the frames and if you know what to look for it is pretty easy to tell their equipment from most other brands. Markings or no markings.

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                      • #12
                        Nobody ever gets the "buggy-whip makers" line past me. I quickly quiz them, what year do they think the big wagon-making firms quit? Usually, not being high-minded, they give a year before 1900, and lose the bet and the argument. But that 1929 production date surprised even me.

                        Incidentally, has anyone priced a buggy-whip lately? No one who stayed in the trade has any regrets about it. My local blacksmith closed his shop, to retire on his savings, in the late 1960's--and by that time, sport riding had increased to the point where he sold the farrier's customer list to a successor! Have to admit though, by that time very few rode to the shop.

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