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  • Photo locations in ads

    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

  • #2
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

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    • #3
      Photo locations in ads

      I have a question, or maybe more than one. We know that the 1962 Hawk was photographed in front of a famous Roman fountain (by Bernini?), but how many other locations photographed for Studebaker ads can we identify? Does anyone know the building they photographed the 1966 Cruiser in front of? It's a hemicycle design.

      I'm not sure if this topic has been discussed before.
      "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

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      • #4
        Well, the background could be an actual photograph, but the car isn't - unless you count "extremely heavily retouched photo" as an actual photo! Nice shot, though.

        Here's the 1966 ad I was talking about:
        "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

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        • #5
          Well, the background could be an actual photograph, but the car isn't - unless you count "extremely heavily retouched photo" as an actual photo! Nice shot, though.

          Here's the 1966 ad I was talking about:
          "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

          Comment


          • #6
            quote: Well, the background could be an actual photograph, but the car isn't - unless you count "extremely heavily retouched photo" as an actual photo! Nice shot, though.
            If it was one thing Studebaker's ad agency was good at, it was retouching! Take a look at these brochure pictures. I don't know where the backgrounds were taken. A lot of the factory photos were taken at the test track and at the house at the test track





            Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

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            • #7
              quote: Well, the background could be an actual photograph, but the car isn't - unless you count "extremely heavily retouched photo" as an actual photo! Nice shot, though.
              If it was one thing Studebaker's ad agency was good at, it was retouching! Take a look at these brochure pictures. I don't know where the backgrounds were taken. A lot of the factory photos were taken at the test track and at the house at the test track





              Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

              Comment


              • #8
                I have to say that they do not look like actual photo's of car or people to me, they look like the Advertising Dept had some very talented artist that drew the ads in color since color photograph's in Magazine's were none existant. If I'm wrong, it wont be the first time, its just how it looks to me.



                www.AutomotiveHistoryOnline.com

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                • #9
                  I have to say that they do not look like actual photo's of car or people to me, they look like the Advertising Dept had some very talented artist that drew the ads in color since color photograph's in Magazine's were none existant. If I'm wrong, it wont be the first time, its just how it looks to me.



                  www.AutomotiveHistoryOnline.com

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                  • #10
                    quote: I have to say that they do not look like actual photo's of car or people to me, they look like the Advertising Dept had some very talented artist that drew the ads in color since color photograph's in Magazine's were none existant. If I'm wrong, it wont be the first time, its just how it looks to me.
                    I don't know how these ads were done, so I may be wrong, too, but I would guess that a photograph was made and then colored and retouched. You can usually tell if it is a drawing because the artists usually exaggerated the details like they did on the 58 ads. Below are a factory photo and a drawing of the 58 wagon.




                    Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

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                    • #11
                      quote: I have to say that they do not look like actual photo's of car or people to me, they look like the Advertising Dept had some very talented artist that drew the ads in color since color photograph's in Magazine's were none existant. If I'm wrong, it wont be the first time, its just how it looks to me.
                      I don't know how these ads were done, so I may be wrong, too, but I would guess that a photograph was made and then colored and retouched. You can usually tell if it is a drawing because the artists usually exaggerated the details like they did on the 58 ads. Below are a factory photo and a drawing of the 58 wagon.




                      Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It's a little off-topic, but wasn't there a decision by U.S. courts, or some government action back in the late 1950s or early 1960 that made it illegal for auto companies to distort the proportions and other details of cars in their ads? I'm quite sure there was some regulation or something that changed how cars were drawn for sales purposes. It fell under the heading of false advertizing.
                        "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

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                        • #13
                          It's a little off-topic, but wasn't there a decision by U.S. courts, or some government action back in the late 1950s or early 1960 that made it illegal for auto companies to distort the proportions and other details of cars in their ads? I'm quite sure there was some regulation or something that changed how cars were drawn for sales purposes. It fell under the heading of false advertizing.
                          "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

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                          • #14
                            I don't know of any law, but there may have been. The pictures below are not a Studebaker ad but are from the Dec. 57 issue of Look Magazine. They drew all the 58 makes. The proportions are almost laughable!



                            Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

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                            • #15
                              I don't know of any law, but there may have been. The pictures below are not a Studebaker ad but are from the Dec. 57 issue of Look Magazine. They drew all the 58 makes. The proportions are almost laughable!



                              Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

                              Comment

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