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  • #16
    The zip-up shelter does include mice, but that seems rather doubtful. If they want in, they find a way. " It zips up like a plastic lunch bag to prevent rust, dust, bugs, mice, and even ultra violet rays."
    Tom Senecal Not enough money or years to build all of the Studebakers that I think I can.

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    • #17
      I've said it before...and I'll say it again....as politely as I can....Drink a beverage...pee slightly at all entrance areas once a month in the Fall and Winter...works perfectly. If you think mice don't like cats...they really don't like people...mark your territory...Think about it...we are the highest predator and I suspect all animals know this...Yet we never mark our territory because we are civilized and "flush" away our waste. Oh well, I said my peeeeeecie.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by jg61hawk View Post
        I've said it before...and I'll say it again....as politely as I can....Drink a beverage...pee slightly at all entrance areas once a month in the Fall and Winter...works perfectly. If you think mice don't like cats...they really don't like people...mark your territory...Think about it...we are the highest predator and I suspect all animals know this...Yet we never mark our territory because we are civilized and "flush" away our waste. Oh well, I said my peeeeeecie.
        LOL..........maybe down where you live, but I rent a garage in a private home, the last thing I want is to void my bladder and have the owner or family member catch me in the act!.................know what??????????? I will get the "riot act" to remove my Avanti permanently from the garage.

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        • #19
          I have a manufactured home that sits on a cinder block foundation. Between the two is a molding. A few weeks ago I saw a mouse run across the patio & up the foundation & tucked under the molding! The small gap that existed I filled with a bead of silicone & fastened the molding with screws after removing the nails that held it prior.
          59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
          60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
          61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
          62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
          62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
          62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
          63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
          63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
          64 Zip Van
          66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
          66 Cruiser V-8 auto

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          • #20
            I have ladies on both sides who feed feral cats. I hated it at first but one day noticed I have never seen any mice since I have them around. The only drawback is I have a dozen or so cats constantly circling the house. I don't like cats much but hate mice more.
            Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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            • #21
              Rodents have very strong teeth. Anything that can be chewed away, will be.
              But they can't chew through metal. And they hate steel wool.
              To seal a crack or hole from your fine four footed fiends, get non-soap steel wool and expanding foam insulation.
              Stuff the steel wool into the hole or crack, then spray the foam into it and around the opening. (It comes in spray cans).
              The rodents will chew at the outer insulation, but when they get to the steel wool they will give up. Hole remains sealed.

              This will work for any holes a rodent could get through except the place where the weatherstripping of a garage door meets the side frames of the garage door.
              If there is a space in those corners you can not seal it because the door still has to work. A pile of tempting rodent "treats" or traps right at that spot are about all you can do to defeat that kind of space.

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              • #22
                Before I retired in 2006 I raced homing pigeons for seven years. The loft had a raised floor made of extruded metal. The pigeon droppings would fall through to the ground. The pigeon feed would also drop to the floor. I had chicken wire around the area between the ground and the floor. When I would enter the loft early in the morning and turn on the lights there would be mice running everywhere. The mice would get in the pigeon feeders and crap and if the pigeons ate it they would have problems.

                A FedEx driver delivered some stuff to the house and let us know he was getting ready to open a pest control business and wanted to know if we would be interested in having him become our pest control provider. I asked him if he thought he could do anything about the mice in the loft. He said he thought he could help the situation. He brought a bait station on his first visit loaded with poison. He said to give it a couple of weeks and see what happened. He also said the poison would make the mice very thirsty and they would leave the loft and die elsewhere. I was amazed at the result. The last two years I raced I saw a total of two mice in the loft and one of them was on his last legs.

                In the fifteen years since I stopped racing the birds I have seen a total of two more. Last year I cleaned up the loft to store the parts for my current coupe project and found one carcass. He gave me some of the poison so I could fill the bait stations in the loft and in my detached garage. I have not seen a mouse in the garage very often. I tried to see the name of the poison but I had disposed of the bucket it was in. It is a red poison and obviously puts the hurts on mice. Pets cannot get in to the poison as the holes are about 2 inches in diameter.

                Charlie D.

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                • #23
                  Cats are a great rodent control. I had the 2004 Jag XJR in the metal building all winter covered with a cotton car cover. A country cat has also been using the building as seen by the fur left on top of the cover. Not a trace of rodents.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Charlie D View Post
                    Before I retired in 2006 I raced homing pigeons for seven years. The loft had a raised floor made of extruded metal. The pigeon droppings would fall through to the ground. The pigeon feed would also drop to the floor. I had chicken wire around the area between the ground and the floor. When I would enter the loft early in the morning and turn on the lights there would be mice running everywhere. The mice would get in the pigeon feeders and crap and if the pigeons ate it they would have problems.

                    A FedEx driver delivered some stuff to the house and let us know he was getting ready to open a pest control business and wanted to know if we would be interested in having him become our pest control provider. I asked him if he thought he could do anything about the mice in the loft. He said he thought he could help the situation. He brought a bait station on his first visit loaded with poison. He said to give it a couple of weeks and see what happened. He also said the poison would make the mice very thirsty and they would leave the loft and die elsewhere. I was amazed at the result. The last two years I raced I saw a total of two mice in the loft and one of them was on his last legs.

                    In the fifteen years since I stopped racing the birds I have seen a total of two more. Last year I cleaned up the loft to store the parts for my current coupe project and found one carcass. He gave me some of the poison so I could fill the bait stations in the loft and in my detached garage. I have not seen a mouse in the garage very often. I tried to see the name of the poison but I had disposed of the bucket it was in. It is a red poison and obviously puts the hurts on mice. Pets cannot get in to the poison as the holes are about 2 inches in diameter.

                    Charlie D.
                    The problem is when the mic die inside walls or other hidden places the carcass stinks to high heaven for a long period of time. That is why I do not put mice traps inside my Avanti, sure they die, but then what? The car sits inn a garage 40 miles from my home:-(

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Hawklover View Post

                      The problem is when the mic die inside walls or other hidden places the carcass stinks to high heaven for a long period of time. That is why I do not put mice traps inside my Avanti, sure they die, but then what? The car sits inn a garage 40 miles from my home:-(
                      If you use a product like D-Con or the like, they work by dehdration. The varminks die but do not have enough liquid in them to cause much if any odor. It's worked quite well for me. I once had a Opossum die under my porch. I don't know why, it stunk for quite some time. I didn't find out what that stink was until I replaced that porch some years later.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by bensherb View Post

                        If you use a product like D-Con or the like, they work by dehdration. The varminks die but do not have enough liquid in them to cause much if any odor. It's worked quite well for me. I once had a Opossum die under my porch. I don't know why, it stunk for quite some time. I didn't find out what that stink was until I replaced that porch some years later.
                        I quit using decon and other products like that a few years back when they reduced the concentration of warfarin to protect larger animals. I found two mice in the pole barn swollen up with blood and put them out of their misery. They and others like them don't leave and will smell.

                        My problem is mostly Chipmunks as mice are easy to trap. But a combination of Jawz rat traps with peanut butter and black oil sunflower seeds and a bucket of water with the sunflower seeds floating on top got 3 chipmunks and a mouse yesterday.

                        Bob

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                        • #27
                          I guess we have smarter mice here . They are not at all easy to trap. They steal the bait without tripping the traps over and over again. I have never been able to catch a mouse in any kind of trap here, whether they be spring traps, buckets, teeter totter, or any other type, I tried several, before using poison bait, which seems to have worked.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by bensherb View Post
                            I guess we have smarter mice here . They are not at all easy to trap. They steal the bait without tripping the traps over and over again. I have never been able to catch a mouse in any kind of trap here, whether they be spring traps, buckets, teeter totter, or any other type, I tried several, before using poison bait, which seems to have worked.
                            Buy these traps, tie a couple of kennels of canned corn to the center of the trigger and smear a small amount of peanut butter on the trigger.

                            Works most of the time for mice but the traps are to small for chipmunks, Be sure to use these specific Victor traps not the knockoffs.

                            https://www.lowes.com/pd/Victor-M032...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

                            For Chipmunks float a layer of black oil sunflower seeds on the surface of a bucket 1/2 full of water. Add a ramp and put a smear of peanut butter and a few seeds on the top of the ramp. Took out three of them over the weekend with this method as mentioned above.

                            In all cases, wear gloves to keep human odor off everything.

                            Bob
                            Last edited by sweetolbob; 05-23-2022, 11:22 AM.

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                            • #29
                              Do the math, 100 mice + 2 cats = 0 mice. And a lot fewer gophers too! And good snuggles while watching late night TV.
                              Rafe Hollister
                              Attached Files

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                              • #30
                                NO Chipmonks here, never even seen one anywhere near here. They exist at much higher elevations, I've seen them in the Sierras. At 26 ft we have no chipmonks or squirrels, there are gophers if you get close to the river (about 20 mile east). There use to be rabbits, skunks, opossoms, and the occasional racoon but industrial influx has chased them off. There are a LOT of farel cats and I occasionally see a fox or coyote but not like years ago. Then there is the rare lost bear or cougar that wanders down from the mountains. Of course, just like the mice, you can't catch any of them in a bucket either; they're all pretty wise to traps of any kind. I don't mess with any of them, even the mice, if they don't mess with me. It's when they start getting into my home, destroying my stuff and eating my food that I get vigilante on their little butts.

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