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  • Dreaming sellers=wasted Studes

    I imagine most of us have stories to tell of sellers who thought what they had was ultra rare & valuable leading to scrapped cars; because they were not living in the real world.Case in point I have two examples.
    About 10yrs. ago there were three cars behind a barn that had been slated for demolition,they were two Canadian assembled Studebaker
    64 convertibles and a 65 pillared coupe,all were condition 3-4 cars &
    V/8's,complete & with numerous options.I offered the owner $500. per car as I knew I could make 1 possibly 2 nice cars from the vehicles.
    No way,he wanted $5000. per car & that was final! I thought it was just me, but several other Stude lovers got the same answer.About 4yrs. later a new survey was being put in where the barn was & when the storm sewers were being back-filled all three of the cars were pushed in with the fill!
    Finally about the same time period there was a lovely 55 Champion "C"
    body sitting next to a derelict rural house.It was coral & black with the wide "Butterknife trim" auto,p/s,p/b radio,etc. & was a strong #3 car.I asked the elderly original owner if was interested in selling,he replied if he couldn't get $10,000. for it he was going to give it to his son to restore.Long story short;It sat there 5 years,slowly sinking into the ground & getting vandalized & in the end was scrapped.Sorry to be so long winded but incidents like this kind of bring a tear to my eyes.Anybody else have similar stories to tell?

  • #2
    I think that anyone who is in the old car hobby has similar stories. I have lots of them myself, from a completely original 52 Champion hardtop that wasted away on a used car lot in Farmville, VA to a 50 Commander convertible in a junk yard near Wytheville, VA in the late 80s that the owner wanted $10,000.00 for. He showed me a magazine that said it was worth $50,000.00 in number one condition. Of course, with hardly any floors, it would probably take that much to make it a #1 car. The junk yard has been cleared, and I am sure the car has been crushed.

    Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

    Comment


    • #3
      I think that anyone who is in the old car hobby has similar stories. I have lots of them myself, from a completely original 52 Champion hardtop that wasted away on a used car lot in Farmville, VA to a 50 Commander convertible in a junk yard near Wytheville, VA in the late 80s that the owner wanted $10,000.00 for. He showed me a magazine that said it was worth $50,000.00 in number one condition. Of course, with hardly any floors, it would probably take that much to make it a #1 car. The junk yard has been cleared, and I am sure the car has been crushed.

      Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

      Comment


      • #4
        It's bad enough when nice cars go to waste due to delusions. It's even worse when it's due to bad luck.
        4 years ago, I had a phone call from a bloke asking me if I was interested in a spare pre-select gear box for one of my cars. He knew of a NOS such box that somebody was trying to sell. I got a phone number and tried to call, no luck. Got through the next day, only to be told the box had gone to the scrap-metal crowd as nobody was interested. It was a spare part gear box in it's original "grease paper" in it's original wooden crate from 1950 !!!
        My language got a bit crusty by then.
        Fortunately, my old banger still runs OK, but it would have been just peachy with a new box.
        /H

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        • #5
          It's bad enough when nice cars go to waste due to delusions. It's even worse when it's due to bad luck.
          4 years ago, I had a phone call from a bloke asking me if I was interested in a spare pre-select gear box for one of my cars. He knew of a NOS such box that somebody was trying to sell. I got a phone number and tried to call, no luck. Got through the next day, only to be told the box had gone to the scrap-metal crowd as nobody was interested. It was a spare part gear box in it's original "grease paper" in it's original wooden crate from 1950 !!!
          My language got a bit crusty by then.
          Fortunately, my old banger still runs OK, but it would have been just peachy with a new box.
          /H

          Comment


          • #6
            This is a famous photograph by W. Eugene Smith, but I added the comments at the bottom



            Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

            Comment


            • #7
              This is a famous photograph by W. Eugene Smith, but I added the comments at the bottom



              Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by lstude
                Classic!


                Dick Steinkamp
                Bellingham, WA
                Dick Steinkamp
                Bellingham, WA

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by lstude
                  Classic!


                  Dick Steinkamp
                  Bellingham, WA
                  Dick Steinkamp
                  Bellingham, WA

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    quote:Originally posted by kmul221

                    I imagine most of us have stories to tell of sellers who thought what they had was ultra rare & valuable leading to scrapped cars; because they were not living in the real world....
                    One of the saddest and most disgusting incidents of this type occurred on Cumberland Island, Georgia. Some years ago the National Park Service took over the island which had been the kingdom of a number of very rich families. One of the estates had a large carriage house. The Park Service DROVE six or so cars out of the carriage house and parked them in a row along one of the sand roads. The newest car was a maroon '50 Commander convertible, automatic, full wheel covers, wide whites, etc. The others were 20s and 30s woodies (don't know the makes). The Cumberland Island visitor book shows the Commander in pristine shape, but when I saw it in '92 the top and seats were rotted away and the rear end was sunk in the ground. The woodies were just much worse.

                    [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/64%20Daytona%20Convertible/Copy%20of%20DaytonaConvert7-20-06.JPG[/img=right]

                    Paul Johnson
                    '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
                    '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
                    '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
                    Museum R-4 engine
                    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                    '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:Originally posted by kmul221

                      I imagine most of us have stories to tell of sellers who thought what they had was ultra rare & valuable leading to scrapped cars; because they were not living in the real world....
                      One of the saddest and most disgusting incidents of this type occurred on Cumberland Island, Georgia. Some years ago the National Park Service took over the island which had been the kingdom of a number of very rich families. One of the estates had a large carriage house. The Park Service DROVE six or so cars out of the carriage house and parked them in a row along one of the sand roads. The newest car was a maroon '50 Commander convertible, automatic, full wheel covers, wide whites, etc. The others were 20s and 30s woodies (don't know the makes). The Cumberland Island visitor book shows the Commander in pristine shape, but when I saw it in '92 the top and seats were rotted away and the rear end was sunk in the ground. The woodies were just much worse.

                      [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/64%20Daytona%20Convertible/Copy%20of%20DaytonaConvert7-20-06.JPG[/img=right]

                      Paul Johnson
                      '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
                      '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
                      '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
                      Museum R-4 engine
                      Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                      '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        One of my first objects of car lust was a TR3 that was in pieces under a lean-to over the fence from a greenhouse I worked at. I was 16; I wanted that car so bad I could taste it. I knew I could put it back together.

                        So I went over and asked the elderly lady who lived there if I could buy it from her. No, she said, it had been her husbands' and he was going to restore it before he died, and she couldn't bear to part with it. Over the next 3 summers I visited her numerous times and the answer was always the same. One day I came over and everything was gone - car, lean-to, brush. Her son had hired someone to come out with a bulldozer and a dump truck and scrape the property clean.


                        [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

                        Clark in San Diego
                        '63 F2/Lark Standard
                        http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                        Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          One of my first objects of car lust was a TR3 that was in pieces under a lean-to over the fence from a greenhouse I worked at. I was 16; I wanted that car so bad I could taste it. I knew I could put it back together.

                          So I went over and asked the elderly lady who lived there if I could buy it from her. No, she said, it had been her husbands' and he was going to restore it before he died, and she couldn't bear to part with it. Over the next 3 summers I visited her numerous times and the answer was always the same. One day I came over and everything was gone - car, lean-to, brush. Her son had hired someone to come out with a bulldozer and a dump truck and scrape the property clean.


                          [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

                          Clark in San Diego
                          '63 F2/Lark Standard
                          http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                          Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                          Comment


                          • #14


                            Take the $100,000 and run. [)]

                            ___________________________________________

                            Matthew Burnette
                            Hazlehurst, Georgia
                            '59 Scotsman PU
                            '63 Daytona HT



                            http://mbstudebaker.blogspot.com/
                            http://thestudillac.blogspot.com/

                            Comment


                            • #15


                              Take the $100,000 and run. [)]

                              ___________________________________________

                              Matthew Burnette
                              Hazlehurst, Georgia
                              '59 Scotsman PU
                              '63 Daytona HT



                              http://mbstudebaker.blogspot.com/
                              http://thestudillac.blogspot.com/

                              Comment

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