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"What's in a name?"

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  • "What's in a name?"

    I see lots of ads for old cars on my Facebook site and the fact that they often have missing or incorrect information is hardly newsworthy, but today's seems to have exceeded even my lowest expectations. It shows a Bronze '47 -51 Studie coupe and is smartly identified as a "Luxury Roadster." What's next, a '59 Cadillac box truck?
    peter lee

  • #2
    I have noticed that there's been a proliferation of craptacular quality ads in recent years (okay, it's been quite a few years now). I've sort of tied it in with the ability to post ads for free... So many people whip out their phone and take a handful of poorly composed pictures... without even bothering to take the car out of the garage, turn on some lights, or even wipe the greasy smudge off the camera lens. Then they hork up varying levels of word salad to fill in a few blanks on either an ad template, or just wing the whole thing as an entire run-on sentence. The results can be frustrating, unintentionally misleading, or sometimes mildly entertaining (probably depending on the mood you're in when you're reading it). Admittedly, I have certain triggers that get tripped when I see vehicles "priced" at $1 on Craigslist, odometer readings of 123,456 or 999,999... where the person is clearly just pooping stuff out for the hell of it. Oh, and keyword spamming. Or if they tell you what you can do with the vehicle in their ad copy.

    With all this griping, I think I might already be on to the whole "grumpy old man" thing, and I'm not even particularly old.
    Whirling dervish of misinformation.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Lark Hunter View Post
      I have noticed that there's been a proliferation of craptacular quality ads in recent years (okay, it's been quite a few years now). I've sort of tied it in with the ability to post ads for free... So many people whip out their phone and take a handful of poorly composed pictures... without even bothering to take the car out of the garage, turn on some lights, or even wipe the greasy smudge off the camera lens. Then they hork up varying levels of word salad to fill in a few blanks on either an ad template, or just wing the whole thing as an entire run-on sentence. The results can be frustrating, unintentionally misleading, or sometimes mildly entertaining (probably depending on the mood you're in when you're reading it). Admittedly, I have certain triggers that get tripped when I see vehicles "priced" at $1 on Craigslist, odometer readings of 123,456 or 999,999... where the person is clearly just pooping stuff out for the hell of it. Oh, and keyword spamming. Or if they tell you what you can do with the vehicle in their ad copy.

      With all this griping, I think I might already be on to the whole "grumpy old man" thing, and I'm not even particularly old.
      Tory,

      We all are getting there. Sometimes in today's world, things can be overwhelming that we retreat to what we know: the cranky old grampa and not the fun uncle. Use of proper grammar can easily be checked by going on grammarly.com but that would required a functioning ability to multi task.

      Bob Miles
      There was always someone in school that as the last minutes of class shoot up their hand and say "Teacher you forgot to assign homework"

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