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Has anyone ever seen a Champ PU truck with an original unrusted floor

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  • #16
    Back in the mid 1990s, I bought a couple of Champs from the Bohemian Alps area north of Lincoln. One of them was a 62 with a solid floor and no box and another was a 64 that had been rolled. I built one good truck out of the two but sadly I sold the truck in 1997/98 to pay for a couple of semesters of grad school.
    \"I\'m getting nowhere as fast as I can\"
    The Replacements.

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    • #17
      While not rust free - this truck's floor looked pretty good for a parts truck that had not been on the road since the early 1970s . . . not bad for something that sat outside the last 40+ years - with the floor mat still in it . . .









      For a truck to go 60 years with no rust out in the floors, it would not only have to be in a dry climate, but put under cover for a majority of its life.

      The floor on this truck would probably look as good as they get - 20K miles I think it what it is close to racking up.

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      • #18
        I think one reason the Champs have no floor is that most came with the sliding rear glass. If you ever noticed the bottom window channel has a couple dedicated drains and I think they may even have metal tubes attacked. Instead of draining to the outside they just drain right into the cab and onto to the floor. I really believe they just stopped the thought process at one point and went into production without finishing the design work.


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        • #19
          Sounds like the same engineers who designed the drain system for the Champ sliding rear window went on to design the drain system for the Wagonaire's sliding roof: just put the lower ends the drain tubes inside the vehicle where the water can collect and rot out the floors. As an added bonus, make the diameter of the tubes too small.
          Mark L

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          • nels
            nels commented
            Editing a comment
            Yes, I remember that obvious mistake. Just running the drain on through the rocker would have eliminated most all the serious cancer in those wagons. Avanti Motors did the same thing with their sunroof drains, what were those guys smoking?

        • #20
          Originally posted by nels View Post
          Instead of draining to the outside they just drain right into the cab and onto to the floor.
          There are three drains total on those sliding rear windows - one on each side and one in the middle. They actually do go down the bottom of the cab and dump water to the outside. Problem is many people did not clean those vents out - they got chocked up with debris and did not drain at all. The two Champs my Uncle restored, he shot undercoating in those bare channels from the top followed by a got burst of air from a compressor - he did not stop until undercoating was shooting out the bottom

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          • 62champ
            62champ commented
            Editing a comment
            This is in all my photos of Champs - the three bars running down from the area below the rear window are what carry the water out on the under side of the cab.


          • nels
            nels commented
            Editing a comment
            I was at my storage building today and took a look at my Southern California63 Champ. The floor were better than I remembered but still have holes. The channels that handle the water were intact. After looking at your photo I can see that the water handled by the left and right channel are open at the bottom sides which would allow water to flow into the cab?am I missing something? I imagine the truck in my memory bank had the bottom of the channels open due to rust out?

          • 62champ
            62champ commented
            Editing a comment
            Now I am thinking - I am not 100% sure where it drains out the bottom. Studebaker would not allow it to simply drain into the interior of the cab - there is a service bulletin from the spring of 1960 talking about three possible places the sliding rear windows could leak and how to fix it so water getting inside was not something they wanted. Will need to look at one of the rusted out rear windows to see if it gives clues as to how the water got out. Under the rear of the cab, on both sides, is this open piece - that might be where it was meant to run out . . .


        • #21
          I don't blame sliding rear windows for the rusty Champ floors as I believe the majority of the blame is due to the floors being lower than the door sills (the floors act as a catch pan) and the front floor supports that catch and retaining road debris (mud, salt, etc.) that the front tires kick-up. This leads to rust from the top side and the bottom sides of the floors. The same severe rust has occurred on most of the Larks that I have.

          I bought a 1963 Champ back in 1991 that had spent its entire life in Kingman, Arizona. No sliding rear window, yet the floors were rotted away. I built new floor pans by recycling a hood from a 1963 Lark parts car. I was 19 years old at the time and made do with what I had.
          sigpic
          In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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          • #22
            Somewhere in my collection of original factory bulletins I have a “confidential” service bulletin stating that Champ cabs were not bonderized - just primer and top coat. The point of the bulletin is that they would not accept lack of bonderizing as a factory defect, when in fact they were intentionally manufactured without it.

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            • #23
              I saw a rust free Champ floor in 1964.

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              • #24
                Originally posted by Studebakercenteroforegon View Post
                Somewhere in my collection of original factory bulletins I have a “confidential” service bulletin stating that Champ cabs were not bonderized - just primer and top coat. The point of the bulletin is that they would not accept lack of bonderizing as a factory defect, when in fact they were intentionally manufactured without it.
                My memory didn’t serve me well when I posted this. Champ cabs were Bonderized but not primed.
                From a July 16, 1962 bulletin, entitled TRUCK SHEET METAL:
                ”Occasionally we receive B-888 reports stating that a claim for repainting the truck has been authorized because of the absence of a primer coat on the cab or pickup box sheet metal.
                For your own confidential information the only sheet metal parts that are prime coated are the front fenders and radiator grille. All other parts are Bonderized and then the finishing coats are applied.”
                Signed by W. J. Moeller

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