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Destroying value of rare full classic car

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  • Destroying value of rare full classic car

    Just watched Dennis Gage (I don't think I like him) He was admiring a 1929 Stearns-Knight. It looked great but then you notice the modern wheels and they look under the hood. You guessed it. This north end of a south-bound horse put a Chevy engine in one of the rarest of classic automobiles!!! With the original unique sleeve-valve 8 cylinder engine it was worth over 150k Now it is worth, well, not so much. Maybe 40k on a good day. It is like destroying bronze statues; they are erasing a little piece of history and art while seriously devaluing a major asset.

  • #2
    Depending on the exact you are generally correct. I am the caretaker of the two car collections here in Fort Worth. For the one gentleman I purchase on his behalf at auction a 1970 Chevelle SS with less than 1,000 original and documented miles. It was judged by two independent services as totally original and again documented. The first thing he wanted to do with was restore it, new paint, etc. Remembering originality is not perfect. I reminded him several times about where the value will go if it’s restored vs original. He finally reminded me about who is paying the bills. It’s all about the what owner wants to do.
    Mike - Assistant Editor, Turning Wheels
    Fort Worth, TX


    1964 Avanti R2 #R-4986

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    • #3
      This is true, but, our cars will still be around long after we are gone and I'd rather have some future caretaker thanking me for saving a little piece of history than cussing me for screwing it up. WOW, a 1,000 mile survivor; wash it and air up the tires!

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      • #4
        1929 was the last year for Stearns-Knight and a very special car. However, it is possible that the owner of the car could not afford to have the slide-valve engine rebuilt (I imagine there are few with the knowledge to properly rebuild such an engine and I imagine some replacement parts are not available). $20,000? Maybe $30,000 to have the engine properly rebuilt? I have no idea, perhaps it is much less. Another possibility is that after all of these years, perhaps the original drivetrain was long gone and a Chevrolet drivetrain made the most economical sense. Although not ideal, it is at least on the road for all to see.
        sigpic
        In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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        • #5
          Owner's car, owner's choice, owner's money. At least it's still on the road.
          Paul
          Winston-Salem, NC
          Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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          • #6
            It's not destroyed until it's crushed.
            The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

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            • #7
              Many times a car is purchased later on by someone who recognizes it value as original and restores it to that condition.
              peter lee

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              • #8
                I know it's one of those "Their car, their money" kind of things, but beating a Stearns-Knight with a Chevy stick is pretty cruel and unusual punishment. Actually wish this kind of thing was more unusual...
                Whirling dervish of misinformation.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jeffry Cassel View Post
                  Just watched Dennis Gage (I don't think I like him) He was admiring a 1929 Stearns-Knight. It looked great but then you notice the modern wheels and they look under the hood. You guessed it. This north end of a south-bound horse put a Chevy engine in one of the rarest of classic automobiles!!! With the original unique sleeve-valve 8 cylinder engine it was worth over 150k Now it is worth, well, not so much. Maybe 40k on a good day. It is like destroying bronze statues; they are erasing a little piece of history and art while seriously devaluing a major asset.
                  Agree with you completely and don’t understand this mentality. It seems to be more about the person’s ego and less about preservation of the past. Sorta 🗣🤚. (that’s the best thumb your nose I could come up with)
                  I don’t think much of Mr Gage either, even if he does own a Studebaker.

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                  • #10
                    Winter is here.....
                    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                    Jeff


                    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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                    • #11
                      Gage is a bit different, but he has a show that primarily covers street rods so don't expect him to be interested in covering meticulous restoration projects.
                      Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
                        Winter is here.....
                        AMEN!

                        Went to visit an old friend a few weeks ago. He has a 32 Ford coupe, A 66 Mustang, 60's Corvette, and a 65 Ford pickup, and several others. These have been sitting for probably 15 years, being preserved for the future? What's he driving? Some kind of little pregnant roller skate?? He looked at me when I drove up and said: Man, ARE YOU driving that thang??

                        Been doing this for 63 years and I still cant understand what "DESTROYING VALUE OF RARE FULL CLASSIC CAR " MEANS???

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                        • #13
                          It is easy to complain about the actions of others. I suspect most people who do so would never contemplate spending their own money to prevent such a travesty from occurring.

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                          • #14
                            It is the logic of the thing. If it is going to cost $20,000 grand to repair your Stearns Knight engine, it is illogical to replace it with a Chevy motor. The value of your investment has decreased by several times the cost of the repairs. If the guy is financially over his head, he'd be better off selling the car and finding a 34 Ford and then he can put a 351 C in that! Does Mr. Gage's Studebaker have an LS motor in it???

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                            • #15
                              Could be the hot rod was built from some restorer's parts car that didn't even have an engine in it.
                              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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