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The greatest PAC KARD of them all

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  • Bob Andrews
    replied
    Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post
    Priced at $116,645 I would venture that it could be like the 1976 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible as far as a collector car.

    Take a look at this opinion: How to turn $47K lot trash into $116K auction treasure | Hagerty Media

    Bob Miles
    Enjoyed the heck out of this article, and the fun style in which it was written.

    I have coveted this Continental since it came out. Several years ago I was at a local Auto Expo and I sat in the then-new Lincoln LS. Immediately, in swooped a beautiful girl in a slinky black dress leading with her card and asking, "Isn't it a beauty?" I told her I didn't like it when I saw it the first time as a Camry lol. She asked what I meant by that. I told her I can spend a lot less to be surrounded by plastic and harsh, thin seats; and that I miss the day of REAL Lincolns. That led to her asking how I defined 'real' Lincoln and I told her, it's simple: Unapologetically large, mountains of chrome, cloud ride, lots of power, plush seats, and crappy gas mileage I don't know if she got it. And I don't know if management would care; For many years now, both Lincoln and Cadillac have insisted on marketing to people who really don't care about Lincoln or Cadillac... and ignoring the people that are and ironically, can afford them.

    Currently I drive a 2008 Cadillac station wagon. (They call it SRX). It has been the closest to that proud American luxury car I've found; yet in 2010 they made it look like an Equinox knockoff, in the patter of the Cimarron and Versailles, tarted up economy models. This newest Continental comes pretty close to what I would like. I look forward to getting one. But, I never will buy new, I let others take that huge hit. The wagon is right at 200K miles, so in another year or two I'll start looking for a Continental. Another advantage of buying used luxury cars: as a rule they depreciate faster than average cars. Today in my area the well-heeled want to buy the Cadillac version of the Suburban (Escalade) and the Lincoln version of the Explorer (Navigator)- many surpassing $100K.

    No thanks. If I was ever willing to pay $100K+ for a truck (I will never be) it would have to be capable of doing far more work than carting around 3 rows of (mostly smaller) individuals and a small rowboat.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dwight FitzSimons
    replied
    Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post
    Priced at $116,645 I would venture that it could be like the 1976 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible as far as a collector car.

    Take a look at this opinion: How to turn $47K lot trash into $116K auction treasure | Hagerty Media

    Bob Miles
    I have a new candidate for the greatest PACK ARD of all time: the 1957 Packard Clipper. Let me explain. S-P introduced the '57 Clipper with many features optional, so it was placed only a little above the President. Those options should have been standard, along with a higher quality interior. Taking the lesson of the Hagerty article a loaded Lincoln Continental is much easier to sell than a base model. At least the '57 Packard Clipper COULD HAVE BEEN the greatest PACK ARD of all time. This was a missed opportunity by S-P that would certainly have given Packard more prestige in 1957, something the make needed after the discontinuation of the '56 Packards. It would at least have been the greatest PACK ARD of 1957.
    -Dwight

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  • 6hk71400
    replied
    I know we have gotten off track with this thread. I have in the past owned a 55 400. Even though there are problems (power windows, oil pump, lifters) I would still like another one 55 or 56.

    That said, for the time period of 62-63, I would choose an Imperial LeBaron then Continental, for a mode of transportation for carriage trade. In November 22, 1963 our transportation was a 59 Lark and 59 Rambler Classic with push button Borg Warner.

    We didn't go anywhere. We stayed on the TV until Monday when the coffin was lowered and TAPS was being played. All five of use were crying when that happened.

    Bob Miles

    Leave a comment:


  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post
    Priced at $116,645 I would venture that it could be like the 1976 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible as far as a collector car.

    Take a look at this opinion: How to turn $47K lot trash into $116K auction treasure | Hagerty Media
    If there is one paragraph from that article I have to copy & paste, it is this one:

    "I adore the Lincoln Continental. For what it is: a rapid, silent, spacious all-weather interceptor with the finest interior materials ever fitted to a mass-production American automobile. And for what it represents: an unashamed evocation of arguably purer days, when it was common for adults to have children rather than become children, when intact families were the rule rather than the exception, when neighborhoods bloomed and blossomed with endless and subtle messages of hierarchy and prosperity. Like the scene in John Updike’s Couples where Kennedy has just been shot but they have a black-tie dinner and dance anyway, in someone’s home, because it has been planned and because even their ad hoc thirtysomething anti-society has certain rules which must be obeyed. That sort of thing. You’d want to arrive to such a party in a Continental, although in November 1963 you might have to suppress a brief, involuntary shudder at the thought of how Camelot had come to an end in one. "

    Stu Chapman's excellent book, My Father The Car comes to mind with the unveiling of the Mercedes Benz 600 that still took place the evening of the day JFK had just been shot.

    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • jclary
    replied
    Originally posted by Andy R. View Post
    ...Greatest of them all? Even the ones built 25 years earlier?!...
    When I first saw the title to this thread, I quickly clicked on it expecting to see one of the wonderful Packards of the 1930s.

    Leave a comment:


  • 6hk71400
    replied
    Priced at $116,645 I would venture that it could be like the 1976 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible as far as a collector car.

    Take a look at this opinion: How to turn $47K lot trash into $116K auction treasure | Hagerty Media

    Bob Miles
    Last edited by 6hk71400; 04-02-2021, 04:57 PM. Reason: Additional information

    Leave a comment:


  • Andy R.
    replied
    Originally posted by Milaca View Post
    Speaking of Lincoln, the discontinued Continental Coach Door Edition was six inches longer than the standard Continental, making for a long yet beautiful car. I think these may one day be very sought after by collectors.
    I was thinking the same thing just yesterday. Relatively few people know about them and will likely stay that way, since production sold out early on. With such a small number produced, they are instant classics and not likely to see enough exposure register on the public's radar.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jessie J.
    replied
    I have a picture of a '60 impala rendered in the same manner. Everything is stock and in proportion, except those already long rear quarters and expansive deck lid are artistically extended by another 6 inches or so. Would love to do that to an actual car just to mess with minds,

    Leave a comment:


  • Milaca
    replied
    Speaking of Lincoln, the discontinued Continental Coach Door Edition was six inches longer than the standard Continental, making for a long yet beautiful car. I think these may one day be very sought after by collectors.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeffry Cassel
    replied
    One of my all time favorites, too. Harkens back to a time when it was OK to want a comfortable, big, and prestigious ride. Nowadays a Lincoln rides like a buckboard and looks like everything else on the road. Artist's renderings are just that and, of course, advertizers nowadays never misrepresent their wares!

    Leave a comment:


  • 64V19816
    replied
    Most Beautiful Packard ? Right here https://rmsothebys.com/en/auctions/m...-darrin/778849

    Leave a comment:


  • Dwight FitzSimons
    replied
    Originally posted by Andy R. View Post

    ...and the grown-ups rendered in 4/5 scale!
    By the size of that passenger's head, she must be sitting on a booster seat. Everybody in this ad has tiny heads!
    I remember Cadillac back in the 1990s advertising that the Fleetwood Brougham was longer than the Lincoln Town Car. That would be a dubious distinction to me, but I guess to the target audience it was a positive. So, I assume the midget people and obvious stretching of the Packard were for the same purpose.

    Having said that I love the 1955-56 Packards and would like to have one, big or not.
    -Dwight

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  • Andy R.
    replied
    Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
    Those with experience in artist's renderings will also recognize the car in the illustration is much longer and much lower in overall height and cross-section and only vaguely resembles the real thing.

    jack vines
    ...and the grown-ups rendered in 4/5 scale!
    By the size of that passenger's head, she must be sitting on a booster seat. Everybody in this ad has tiny heads!

    Greatest of them all? Even the ones built 25 years earlier?!

    Clark, you are SOO OOO right about the gutters for print publications. To get it right, you have to know how many pages, paper weight and if near the front, middle or back of the publication.

    Leave a comment:


  • TX Rebel
    replied
    One of my favorite cars

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by showbizkid View Post
    LOL... with much experience in ad layout, I will say that sizing gutters to accomodate page splits is frustrating for graphic designers. Sometimes you get it right, and sometimes...
    I can see why it would be frustrating for the layout artist. It highly depends on the magazine it gets published in. If its a simple folded issue with only a few pages, it will appear broken as seen above, but not so in a thicker bound type with a spine.

    I recall my dad refused to pay full price for a Yellow Pages ad one year as it was printed on the page right next to the spine, and it was buried and nearly invisible when opened to that particular page which was nearly in the middle of the directory.

    Craig

    Leave a comment:

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