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What can 18 years of poor storage do? I'll show you (1953 LandCruiser)

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Jeff_H View Post

    It does not take long....

    Back in the mid 90s, a coworker acquired a 1984 Ford Mustang "SVO". A fairly rare sub-model. He got it for cheap with a bad rear end. Low mileage. This SVO was in pretty decent shape otherwise and needed some mechanical repairs. My friend was a car person and did what was needed. One of the things he did was a good engine compartment cleaning with "simple green". Spent hours scrubbing underhood.

    So, for the winter (this was in Minnesota), he found a unheated building to put it in (concrete floor). I remember being there the next spring when he popped the hood to put the battery in... Holy cow! All the aluminum surfaces were totally crusted with white corrosion like it was dipped in salt or something.

    I think it would have been better off if not cleaned and with whatever oily grease residue instead.

    Humidity really matters after its not outside. On the farm, Dad used to put diesel in a hand pump sprayer and wash down farm machinery that had to set outside over the winter. Helped a lot for paint and surface rusting. Not something you would do with a car really unless a parts car you were trying to preserve.
    There was a thread in my motorcycle club to never use Simple Green on aluminum, it damages it. I never tried it to find out.

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    • #17
      My 53 Starliner that sat I don’t know where since 1997, surface rust abounded in engine bay. Thankfully the body and frame were ok.
      Attached Files

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      • #18
        I've been sitting here for the last 5 minutes just shaking my head. It truly disturbs me to see a running, driving car be allowed to go downhill like that, but I've seen it before. This is a particularly egregious example. I've said it elsewhere: I get a nervous when an old car I own is out of commission for more than a couple weeks. I know what can happen. This has me thinking of one of the cars that really sparked my interest in classics, a '50 Ford that my uncle owned. My father put a fresh coat of paint on it c.1980 and my uncle drove it home from Maryland to Mississippi. Though it only sat in our driveway for a few weeks when I was 8 years old, it was a big deal to me. The last I heard it is now a rusted hulk, sinking into the ground.

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        • #19
          The survival rate of most 1950s automobiles is in the pits. For some models, what? 1 out of a 1000? 1 out of 10,000?
          I am a Studebaker owner and enthusiast, have been for over 60 years. I have 3 very complete and restorable Studes stashed in my barn, and A lifetime collection of Studebaker parts, manuals, and literature.
          Never sold or parted with a Studebaker that I did not end up regretting.

          I may have not been the best at preserving these vehicles, but then the ones in my possession are still here because I have adamantly refused to allow them pass on to those that would have sent them the way of all those hundreds of thousands that no longer exist.
          To read some of these posts, it would appear that makes me an uncaring and evil person, utterly unfit to be in possession of a Studebaker. Fact is, the course of my life, my employment, and family responsibilities took precedence over the liberty of engaging an unprofitable hobby.

          Now, approaching my 72nd year, it doesn’t make a hell of a lot of sense to be pouring tens of thousands of dollars and thousands of hours of my remaining time into old cars that I really have no need of, or place needed to go. Most weeks I don’t drive 10 miles.

          Doesn’t mean that I no longer enjoy the distinction and pride of ownership and preservation of these now rare pieces of history.
          And there is no way in hell while I live, that I’ll sell or give them to anyone that will not take on a obligation to continue to preserve them.
          My Studebaker enthusiasm has been a significant part of my children’s and grandchildren’s experience and memories of me, perhaps my extremely successful and wealthy son or grandson will decide have one or more restored.
          Or perhaps they will just languish in storage for another generation. Won’t care at all once I’m gone. But I’m not.

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          • #20
            I've asked about an old car probably hundreds of time when I was younger...
            A lot of time the response was "he's going to fix it up someday" most are rusted out hulks now.

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            • #21
              Rusted out hulks make parts cars. I own one 1964 Daytona hardtop. Over the decades I have disassembled and stored the usable parts from four other Daytona HTs that had succumbed to frame and floor rust.
              Made two 600 mile+ trips, crossing the Canadian border to retrieve unrestorable Daytona hulks. Thus I have replacement Daytona roof panels, multiple sets of doors, hoods, grills, bumpers and the now extremely hard to find decklids, as well windows and as hundreds of other salvageable parts stashed.
              Then in addition to that my wife and I made a annual pilgrimages to the South Bend Studebaker spring swap meet for decades where we would fill our commmercial van and attached trailer with Studebaker swap meet finds, and rare NOS parts from Newman Altman, and latter SASCO.
              I have nos Studebaker parts new in their original factory boxes that have not been available in decades.
              But I have simply had too busy of a life to ever get around to using. Horrible bad evil Studebaker owner that I am.

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              • #22
                Jessie J...I don't know how to tell you this....but if you never post again in another thread......you will have stopped posting at exactly 1 2 3 4 (1,234posts). Ha!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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                • #23
                  Patrick,

                  Sorry to see the car in this much stress! But at least it's still a car, for which there is hope. Before you invest your time an money into parting it out, you owe it to yourself and the family to give it a chance at survival. If for no other reason, in memory of the departed.

                  The reality is that parts for post war Studebakers are of little value. Virtually everyone reading this has his own stash of parts, for which there is no market. The parts that we have saved, and continue to save, are the remnants of the cars that have been parted out over the last seventy years. The parts survive but cars have not. Together with the fact that few people are able or willing to do the work required to restore them to a useable state. Reality is parting this car out is a dead end!

                  Bill

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                  • #24
                    Bryan G: I've said it elsewhere: I get a nervous when an old car I own is out of commission for more than a couple weeks. I know what can happen. Exactly!!! I have a Hawk and a Model A. Neither particularly are in the way so it becomes "a job" this year with virus and no shows and no going out to diner to move them. But move them I did because of exactly what Bryan posted and so many before him, a little lost time moving them turns into junk or an animal attraction. I walk around them, leave light s on, pee a little by them, throw gas on the floor, make the area "human inhabited" to keep away the mice. Drive them and change fluids even though the fluids don't need it.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Hallabutt View Post
                      Reality is parting this car out is a dead end!

                      Bill
                      I agree 100%.
                      Far better and easier to sell this vehicle to someone that actually has a desire to ‘fix it up’ and return it to operable condition.
                      There are many collectors out there who actually prefer that patina of age, and are not in the least put off by weathering and stains.
                      That straight and solid body intact has far more collector value than another ton of unsalable weatherd parts.
                      Put it on eBay with a low opening bid. You may see the bidding rise into several thousands of dollars.
                      If it wasn’t so far away, and I didn’t already have three Studebaker’s taking up space, I’d offer 2 grand for it, as is, here and now.
                      Someone else will if you give them the opportunity.
                      PLEASE DO NOT disassemble and destroy this lovely old Studebaker that someone else with discernment will cherish.

                      Jessie J.


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                      • #26
                        As a guy who makes a living selling Studebakers parts, I tend to agree with those above (for whatever it’s worth). There aren’t really, well, any parts on a 53 Land Cruiser that are worth anything. A 232” on its own is hard to give away. Nobody is ever in the market for sedan sheetmetal. If parted out and advertised, you’ll still own 95% of the parts in ten years.

                        Put me in the “encourage you to fix the car up” group. While it’s usually the opposite, in this case that car is worth more as a car than it is in pieces.

                        I like ‘53 Land Cruisers, and I’ve only seen a couple of them, ever. If I didn’t already have a couple of major Studebaker rebuild projects lined up, I’d have to seriously consider this one.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Hallabutt View Post
                          Patrick,

                          Sorry to see the car in this much stress! But at least it's still a car, for which there is hope. Before you invest your time an money into parting it out, you owe it to yourself and the family to give it a chance at survival. If for no other reason, in memory of the departed.

                          The reality is that parts for post war Studebakers are of little value. Virtually everyone reading this has his own stash of parts, for which there is no market. The parts that we have saved, and continue to save, are the remnants of the cars that have been parted out over the last seventy years. The parts survive but cars have not. Together with the fact that few people are able or willing to do the work required to restore them to a useable state. Reality is parting this car out is a dead end!

                          Bill
                          Bill,

                          The only time post war Studebaker parts are of little value is when you don't need the car or parts. When you need to purchase parts, well, you know, they aren't making them any more and I am going to use them some day (ad nauseam).

                          I found some parts here on the forum that are a 12 hour ride one way. The only way I can figure to get them home is to drive the Studebaker and install the parts then drive home. I was hoping to leave soon, but I flunked a couple of medical tests and I am having another on Dec 19th and 22nd. I will be in the market for some time to bring the good ol girl back to her 1956 beauty.

                          Bob Miles

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                          • #28
                            If you haven't parted out a car you should know that it is a bunch of work. I have parted out several Studebakers because that was the only way I could get my money back out of them. But, when someone contacts you wanting a part you have to interrupt whatever you are doing and deal with the part. Studebaker people are patient, but one can't expect them to wait but so long. I have two Studes to part out now and I am dreading the task.

                            Might be better to sell the car whole even though you will be selling the parts cheap.

                            One side story is that some people (non-Stude people, mainly), selling a parts Stude, seem to want the sum of the retail value out of all the parts. They understand that the car is a parts car, but they say this part is worth X, that part is worth Y, and they add up all the parts' value. And, that's what they want for the car. Their threat is: "or I'll send it to the crusher."
                            --Dwight

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