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Studebaker and IH truck merger????

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  • #16
    My parents bought an IH chest freezer in 1953 and it was still functioning when the house was sold in 1998.

    I spent many summers of my young life driving IH Farmall Cub and A-series tractors. They were inferior in most respects to the Fords we got later.

    jack vines
    PackardV8

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    • #17
      I've seen a few International Harvester refrigerators:







      Craig

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      • #18
        The last refrigerator that Craig has shown I believe is the last design they offered, maybe a 1954 or 1955 model. I've seen these advertised in farming magazines from back in the day (Successful Farming, The Farmer, etc.) and one advertisement showed that IH offered a variety of stylish finishes for the front door. I think I would like to have one like it for my garage. I notice the one on 'Friends' had the IH emblem in a different location, and it has a chrome ring around it. Looking at various photos of earlier seasons of 'Friends', it appears to have been a Westinghouse refrigerator, not an earlier IH like I had previously thought. I thought you might like to know that, because this is serious, important stuff.





        Last edited by Milaca; 09-15-2020, 05:27 PM.
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        In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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        • #19
          The company I work for was an IH dealer for 74 years. Sold refrigeration equipment in the 1950’s and trucks up until the late 1970’s. My best friend has a 1972 1600 Loadstar that came from our dealership, he sold the ‘73 and ‘74 trucks he had.

          There is still one Scout on the road that we sold that I see in town and lots of IH and CIH tractors.
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          • #20
            Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
            And to add... Raymond Loewy designed the 1939 Farmall tractor (To keep some Studebaker relations in the thread)
            Int'l Harvester did some pretty wild shenanigans to avoid the word bankruptcy. They had a crippling strike in the late 70's.
            About this same time they sold their cast iron foundry operation (Evergreen steel?iirc) to a management group that almost immediately filed for bankruptcy. This was a ploy to avoid union issues and potential lawsuits. They got sued anyways.
            And to add... When IHC sold the AG line to JI Case/Tenneco.... The JI Case mgt. went to every town that has a JI Case dealer and an IHC dealer. They sat the dealer principles down and told them "There will be only one dealer in this town". You two decide who it will be. A lot of long time family owned businesses were destroyed when the weaker of the two was forced to sell (or give away) their dealership.
            The one amusing part was the old 'Triple Diamond' IHC logo. Apparently the upper management of IHC had other things on their minds and let the copyright to the 'Triple Diamond" IHC expire. Someone in Ohio grabbed the logo and copyrighted it in their name. When the 'new' IHC went to use the logo, they were hit with a cease and desist...and then offered an opportunity to buy the 'Triple Diamond' logo back (for BIG dollars). That did not happen and the split "Diamond Road' logo was created (to go along with the new name "Navistar".
            I was with IHC when this all went down, and still have the new 'Navistar' trinkets (coins, hats, pens, etc).. I remember going to one dealer and clearing all sorts of Ag stuff out of barns. Pretty cool stuff. Egg incubators, Ertl toys, manure spreaders, etc.
            Used to drive Scouts and Travelall's as company cars.. They were tanks..
            Long time ago...

            Raymond Loewy also designed the update from the K light truck to the KB (headlights in fenders). But, kept the cab and windows small. This while all other manufacturers increased the size of their cabs. Anybody six foot or over have difficulty driving the K and KB trucks.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
              My parents bought an IH chest freezer in 1953 and it was still functioning when the house was sold in 1998.

              jack vines
              It's amazing how long appliances from the '50s and '60s would keep working.

              Now days........well, for example, about three years was the lifespan of two GE (made offshore) microwaves we had. Finally modified the cabinet to fit a different brand offshore microwave, so far 4 years on it.

              My Grandfather bought a JC Penny's microwave when they first came out, and a great great grandchild is still using it.
              Paul
              Winston-Salem, NC
              Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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              • #22
                I realize that I am helping to divert this thread from its original subject, but I can't help but pile on to R1lark's post. In 1971, I added a 2-car garage to our house. I soon discovered that because it was built into a slope and partly below ground, the humidity inside it stayed near 100% all summer. So I bought a Sears Craftsman dehumidifier (made in the USA) for the garage. 49 years later, it's still humming along, about six months every year.

                Two years ago, we had a small basement flood in a different house, and I needed to dry it out quickly before mold got a start. So I went to Home Depot and bought the biggest dehumidifier they had for sale at the time. It was/is a Hisense brand, very elegant-looking with lots of buttons, controls, and digital displays, made (of course) in China. It worked for two years, then died. A search of the Net shows that the humidity sensor croaks, rendering the unit inoperative. A temporary fix is to take it apart and short across that sensor. It will now run 24/7, until the compressor burns out -- about three months later.
                Skip Lackie

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                • #23
                  In James Ward's excellent book "The Fall of the Packard Motor Car Company", one chapter talks about the desperate searching that Studebaker/Packard did to find another company to merge with or buy them out. This was in 1956 when the insurance companies and banks refused to fund the proposed completely new 1957 models. All the major car companies were approached and they also went to International Harvester. The book states that IH was "decidedly cold" toward Studebaker's proposal. (This is from memory, but correct me if I'm wrong.) It was mentioned too that IH had no need, obviously, for the Studebaker Truck line and that IH dealers were largely rural, which Studebaker already had plenty of. Based on this, I find the story about IH and Studebaker looking into some sort of arrangement unlikely. Although, in the string that was posted in the original post they are talking about the Lark era and not 1956, so who knows for sure?

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                  • #24
                    2 pages and only pictures of refrigerators? During the long years I was building my Studebaker, I had a great little IH Scout to drive around. Now the tables have turned here.
                    The Studebaker is running well and we are enjoying what car events we can find. But the shop recently welcomed in this POS 77 traveler.

                    This is the only vehicle I've ever owned rustier than my Studebaker. The quarters have been previously replaced - badly. The cab is collapsing and the doors refuse to open. But my twisted logic is that they are all this rusty, so why pay a lot for one that still needs a full makeover.

                    Observing from today, seems like a Studebaker / IH merger would have made some sense. Both proudly made in Indiana!

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Michidan View Post
                      2 pages and only pictures of refrigerators? During the long years I was building my Studebaker, I had a great little IH Scout to drive around. Now the tables have turned here.
                      The Studebaker is running well and we are enjoying what car events we can find. But the shop recently welcomed in this POS 77 traveler.

                      This is the only vehicle I've ever owned rustier than my Studebaker. The quarters have been previously replaced - badly. The cab is collapsing and the doors refuse to open. But my twisted logic is that they are all this rusty, so why pay a lot for one that still needs a full makeover.

                      Observing from today, seems like a Studebaker / IH merger would have made some sense. Both proudly made in Indiana!
                      I just made a deal to purchase a 1980 Scout II yesterday afternoon, though it is a parts truck being it is rustier than the one you have pictured. I believe the body structure was weak on these from the factory, then add years of rust, and they fall apart. Many reproduction steel body panels are available now, though I haven't found any front fenders for these.
                      sigpic
                      In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Michidan View Post
                        But the shop recently welcomed in this POS 77 traveler.
                        Cool looking vehicle! Did not realize that IH built 2-door Travelers.
                        Paul
                        Winston-Salem, NC
                        Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by r1lark View Post

                          Cool looking vehicle! Did not realize that IH built 2-door Travelers.
                          Ah, but do not confuse the TravelALL, which is a 4 door full size Suburbanlike truck, with a Scout TravlER, which is just a Scout with an 18 inch longer tub.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Milaca View Post

                            I just made a deal to purchase a 1980 Scout II yesterday afternoon, though it is a parts truck being it is rustier than the one you have pictured. I believe the body structure was weak on these from the factory, then add years of rust, and they fall apart. Many reproduction steel body panels are available now, though I haven't found any front fenders for these.
                            Cool! But I promise you, this is really a parts truck too. The only thing connecting the firewall to the rear of the truck is the top. What appears to be rocker panels is 30 year old pop riveted tin. These things were rusting away in the 80's! But yes, there are some panels, floors, and rockers in reproduction.
                            I replaced the entire bottom of my 52 hardtop, and the doors still close. I'm looking forward to the challenge here also. I think there are a few fiberglass front fenders in the world, but no new repros. Just patch panels to fix your old ones.

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                            • #29
                              And the Scout Traveler shared its body with the Scout Terra, which was a longer wheelbase pickup than the Scout II pickup (which the Terra replaced). The Scout Terra was available with a Nissan diesel engine, making it the first mid-size pickup to be available with a diesel engine in the United States.
                              sigpic
                              In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Michidan View Post

                                Cool! But I promise you, this is really a parts truck too. The only thing connecting the firewall to the rear of the truck is the top. What appears to be rocker panels is 30 year old pop riveted tin. These things were rusting away in the 80's! But yes, there are some panels, floors, and rockers in reproduction.
                                I replaced the entire bottom of my 52 hardtop, and the doors still close. I'm looking forward to the challenge here also. I think there are a few fiberglass front fenders in the world, but no new repros. Just patch panels to fix your old ones.
                                Yes, patch panels are available for the front fenders, but they are next to worthless when the patch panel doesn't extend high enough to reach any steel.
                                I'm hoping that somebody soon will reproduce steel front fenders. As for the factory floor pans, they apparently only spent two minutes designing that portion of the vehicle. Whatever you fabricate will likely be much better than original.
                                sigpic
                                In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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