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The Common-Sense Car

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  • DougHolverson
    replied
    From the sketchbook: a couple of Americanized immigrant kids (mama is from Tau Ceti way) enjoy themselves too much busking through a certain jingle....
    Click image for larger version

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  • DougHolverson
    replied
    I have a Real Player snippet of the commercial that I downloaded around '99, when Real Player still was a big thingie. If anybody here can get it to play and of I can upload a file here.

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  • JRoberts
    replied
    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post

    I don't think of the Differences between the '59 and '64 as one is better looking than the other, they are just Different "STYLES"!
    And I too, love em both.

    I also like the Roundy, Cute and very Practical Look of the '59-'61 Larks, especially '59-'60, but the 1964 Style was just keeping with the Style of the times, looks similar to the '63/'64 Dart, Valiant, Chevelle, Fairlane and do I HAVE to say it... Rambler Classic.
    My Cruiser has been called a Rambler more than once. More puzzling, however, is the guy you thought my Champ was a Rambler. To be precise, "....I didn't know Rambler made trucks?

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  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    Yes. Whole books have been written about the decision to continue production in Hamilton. Was not simple, and the relative boring-ness of the product line was only one of the considerations at play.

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by Milaca View Post
    Controversy time!

    Studebaker should have ended auto production entirely with the closing of the South Bend plant in 1963.

    It could have ended production on a high-note, being that it was building attractive automobiles (Daytona hardtop, Daytona convertible, GT Hawk and Avanti) which also included exciting high-performance upgrades as an option for all models. And even though the truck line was old and tired at this time, at least they were still offering trucks.
    Studebaker had a contract with their dealers that had to be met, or they would have been forced to pay them out with a huge penalty.

    We discussed that here------>
    https://forum.studebakerdriversclub....lmanac-article

    Craig

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  • Milaca
    replied
    Controversy time!

    Studebaker should have ended auto production entirely with the closing of the South Bend plant in 1963.

    It could have ended production on a high-note, being that it was building attractive automobiles (Daytona hardtop, Daytona convertible, GT Hawk and Avanti) which also included exciting high-performance upgrades as an option for all models. And even though the truck line was old and tired at this time, at least they were still offering trucks.

    When production ended in South Bend, they were then only left with boring cars to offer to consumers.

    As we know for 1965, they only continued production of the Lark-type cars, even more sad is that they dropped the hardtop and convertible versions of these and dropped the high-performance upgrades.

    1965 switched to GM engines as production of Studebaker engines ended, leaving me wondering why people wouldn't just simply buy a Chevrolet or other GM car being that they were buying a GM powered car anyway. The 1965 Lark-types look fine, but GM had hardtops and convertible with much higher performance available and offered a variety of sizes and models of cars.
    And for 1966, the exterior design changes made the Lark-type look very stale and boring, yet another reason to disregard Studebaker as a choice for a new car purchase.

    Production ending in 1966, Studebaker did not go out on-top from an automobile design standpoint. That is very sad, as they had many beautiful designs throughout the years, but ended with a stale, boring looking car.

    On the bright side, some non-Studebaker folk think that the Avanti was the last of the Studebakers produced. A very exciting and sporty looking car, the Avanti is what I prefer to remember as Studebaker's last car.

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by showbizkid View Post
    As a marketing professional, I noticed that they did something quite common in my industry - addressing the lack of annual styling change head-on and trying to spin it as a benefit.

    "Our Motto: If You Can't Fix It, Feature It!"
    Ford did exactly that in 1977 and 1978 with their LTD after GM downsized all their B & C body full size cars. Ford advertised them as "The full sized car that kept its full size!"

    Craig

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  • showbizkid
    replied
    Originally posted by Bordeaux Daytona View Post
    There's a 1965 Studebaker Command Sense radio jingle here..... 24:43 Cruisin' 1965
    https://youtu.be/lABypI-_oCs?t=1483
    As a marketing professional, I noticed that they did something quite common in my industry - addressing the lack of annual styling change head-on and trying to spin it as a benefit.

    "Our Motto: If You Can't Fix It, Feature It!"

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeRich
    replied
    Originally posted by JRoberts View Post
    I have always thought the 1964, 1965 and 1966 models were better looking that the earlier Lark models. I am not saying the I don't like those earlier models, just that thing the latter models were an improvement of the earlier ones. Of course I could be considered to be biased as I own a '65 Cruiser that I dearly love. That said, the first Studebaker that I owned was a '59 hard top that I still like the looks of.
    I don't think of the Differences between the '59 and '64 as one is better looking than the other, they are just Different "STYLES"!
    And I too, love em both.

    I also like the Roundy, Cute and very Practical Look of the '59-'61 Larks, especially '59-'60, but the 1964 Style was just keeping with the Style of the times, looks similar to the '63/'64 Dart, Valiant, Chevelle, Fairlane and do I HAVE to say it... Rambler Classic.
    Last edited by StudeRich; 09-11-2020, 05:40 PM.

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  • JRoberts
    replied
    I have always thought the 1964, 1965 and 1966 models were better looking that the earlier Lark models. I am not saying the I don't like those earlier models, just that thing the latter models were an improvement of the earlier ones. Of course I could be considered to be biased as I own a '65 Cruiser that I dearly love. That said, the first Studebaker that I owned was a '59 Lark hard top that I still like the looks of.
    Last edited by JRoberts; 09-19-2020, 06:48 AM.

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    Now THAT brings back a LOT of Memories from the 1964 Robert W. Morgan KHJ 93 Los Angeles Radio Show!

    And an interesting but Corny Stude. Commercial I have never heard.

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  • Lou Van Anne
    replied
    ".....with the traditional quality name" from the radio jingle.

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  • Hallabutt
    replied
    Originally posted by Dwight FitzSimons View Post
    Today automakers keep the same styling for several years before a facelift, or a new generation. But, in the 1960's and prior buyers' expectation was that their new car would not look like last year's styling. That cost Studebaker, on lower production, relatively more than the big 3.

    As to Volkswagen, they were an exception, not the rule.
    No offense, but I feel the need to push back on the basic precept. Going back into the 20's Studebaker had a policy of not changing chassis or designs every year. During the 20's Studebaker didn't even have yearly model unveilings. They chose instead to make running changes and upgrades as they became available. During the 30's they began their policy of maintaining basic body and chassis for two years. Facelifts and mechanical upgrades notwithstanding, a 1936 President and a 1937 President are the same car.

    This policy continued post-war, and even stretched out to three or more year cycles. Note 1947-49, 1950-52 (noteworthy chassis changes between 1950 and 51) 1953-55, 1956-58, 1959-60, 1961-62 (1961 kind of a bastard most consider it a 1st gen car but it has upgrades that couple it with a 62), 1963 is again a vastly different car then the 62, but they look the same, and finally 1964-66. Then there is the CK car basically the same from 1956-61, and finally the GT. This is just a basic overview and specifics may be open for discussion, but here just to highlight basic company philosophy.

    There is simply no way that an independent, like Studebaker, making less then 200,000 cars a year, could amortize the cost of regular model changes every year. This might be the case of beauty being only skin deep.

    Bill

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  • BobWaitz
    replied
    Originally posted by Bordeaux Daytona View Post
    There's a 1965 Studebaker Command Sense radio jingle here..... 24:43 Cruisin' 1965
    https://youtu.be/lABypI-_oCs?t=1483
    I bought this album on cassette as a teen and was surprised the Stude commercial was on there.
    Pretty sure it's Hal Smith doing one of the voices
    I might have to snip a bit of that out and use it for the ring tone of my Studebaker friends...

    Leave a comment:


  • Dwight FitzSimons
    replied
    Today automakers keep the same styling for several years before a facelift, or a new generation. But, in the 1960's and prior buyers' expectation was that their new car would not look like last year's styling. That cost Studebaker, on lower production, relatively more than the big 3.

    As to Volkswagen, they were an exception, not the rule.

    Leave a comment:

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