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10 American cars that were successful , yet gone

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  • 10 American cars that were successful , yet gone

    https://www.hotcars.com/american-car...sful-yet-gone/

  • #2
    A rather superficial and over-simplified article, but still fun to read. Of the 10 listed, I owned (or own) 4 of those brands (Studebaker, Plymouth, Mercury and AMC).

    They couldn't even get AMC right. It is (was) American Motors (with an s on the end), not American Motor.

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    • #3
      Two cars out of that list were NOT "successful", as per the article. The Tucker never made it to market, and the DeLorean had all kinds of production issues upon startup in Northern Ireland, and its lack of pre-production testing doomed it in the marketplace. I will add the Edsel in Ford's mind was not a success. (even though in 1958, Edsel outsold both Studebaker and Packard.)

      Craig
      Last edited by 8E45E; 09-04-2020, 05:30 AM.

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      • #4
        Also, Edsel was produced for 3 years ('58-'60) not 2. The '59 & '60 being Fords with different trim. -Jim

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        • #5
          I have owned new or near new of all of those brands, except for the Tucker, Hummer, Edsel and Delorean. As far as the Delorean, I had a new one on order for a long time and when it arrived I refused delivery.

          EDIT: I won't waste my time with all of the errors in this item.
          Last edited by studegary; 09-04-2020, 07:15 AM.
          Gary L.
          Wappinger, NY

          SDC member since 1968
          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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          • #6
            Also, Edsel was produced for 3 years ('58-'60) not 2. The '59 & '60 being Fords with different trim. -Jim
            Jim, one could posit the reason for the failure of the Edsel was it was the buying public could easily see it was always just a Ford/Mercury with different trim and a grille cribbed from the Packard Predictor. The pushbutton auto shift on the steering wheel wasn't quite enough to differentiate it in the marketplace.

            EDIT: I won't waste my time with all of the errors in this item.
            Agree, Gary; these clickbait blogger/floggers just crank out articles as fast as they can type on subjects on which they don't even know enough to be interesting, because the errors come so thick and fast one can't overlook them.

            jack vines
            Last edited by PackardV8; 09-04-2020, 07:44 AM.
            PackardV8

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            • #7
              Heck, there were at least two successful automobiles built in here in Indianapolis alone that were more successful than Tucker. Someone may recall Stutz and Duesenberg.

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              • #8
                They didn't mention Kaiser.

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                • #9
                  What a Terrible choice of Vehicles to represent Studebaker! At least AMC got a sharp looking, sporty Model shown.

                  Picture number One is not how most people remember Studebaker, and a '57 Sedan is a good sturdy family car but, little known by the General Public and not as good looking, popular as say a; '53/'54 Starliner, Speedster, Hawk or Avanti.
                  Some writer must have spent all of about 1 1/2 minutes on Wikipedia to find a Studebaker.
                  StudeRich
                  Second Generation Stude Driver,
                  Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                  • #10
                    As always these at articles are locked in to post-war "success." No mention is made of how success is measured. It's hard to imagine ignoring decades of successes racked up by so many of the pre-war independents. It just shows little understanding of history, and no editorial imagination. Some of the ridiculous inclusions speak for themselves. The exclusions are too numerous to list. One that really stands out is Willys, under whose guidance the Jeep became an American icon. All of the companies who came after Willys-Kaiser, AMC and Chrysler owe a great deal of their post-war successes to the Willys Jeep.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
                      Agree, Gary; these clickbait blogger/floggers just crank out articles as fast as they can type on subjects on which they don't even know enough to be interesting, because the errors come so thick and fast one can't overlook them.

                      jack vines
                      I believe Jack is correct. These bloggers get paid for each article/blog that they upload, regardless of errors. Just yesterday, I read of a 27 year-old blogger that makes over $500,000 a year writing blogs for various customers. Crazy money!
                      sigpic
                      In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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                      • #12
                        What about Saturn? Successful for a few years but then GM lost money on that brand and just about every car brand in the 2000's. It is ok for someone to be young and blog but if you have vision only limited to your experience and not have the least bit of curiosity to history, and only care about your experience, that is sad indeed.

                        Bob Miles

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                        • #13
                          I will agree that these articles are primarily clickbait. To dismiss most of these companies in a paragraph or 2 is a great disservice. And to include Tucker, which only built 48/51 cars, depending on the source, hardly qualifies as successful. Maybe the only way to look at this is that it may elicit a craving for more info, so the reader will search out greater in depth information about the companies.

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