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  • Not your average Studebaker post.

    Hello everyone,

    I am a new member but have been reading old posts for the last month or two. I don't actually own a Studebaker but I have been working on my grandfather's old 1951 Jeep Willys with a Studebaker 259 (Vin = V 587982) in it. I was able to (correctly?) identify the engine from a link I found in this forum. It seems to have come out of a '63 Lark. My grandfather bought the Jeep new in 1951 and my dad and uncle swapped the 259 in it around 1969. My dad is getting kinda old and his memory isn't what it was but said that his brother fabricated the motor mounts and it bolted right up to the Willys transmission. He cant remember which bell housing they used or many other details. They also changed the gears out, added the extended bed, and used it for hunting and staking mines. The Jeep was parked in the early '80s and sat in a field for 40 years. My dad hauled the Jeep to his property a few years back and rebuilt the carb within the last year or two.

    Since I had some free time during lockdown I escaped the city. While out here I decided to try and get it running. Before this I have never done more than plugs and struts in a newer car. I put in some Autolite 437s (Thanks!), new wires, distributer cap, fuel pump, fuel line, fuel filters, new gas tank, oil, zddp (Thanks!), battery, soaked some mystery oil in the plug holes, and surprise, surprise, that old Studebaker fired right up. . I'm amazed at how well this engine runs and sounds. Well I think it sounds good as I have never heard a Studebaker engine before. What do you experts think?

    I will post in the tech forum about a couple questions, including the passenger side, lower engine, oil canister filter and what appears to be an old tractor glass bowl fuel filter that screwed into the carb.

    I really wanted to say thanks to everyone that has contributed to this forum and helped me along my journey. I couldn't be more happy and proud to be able to get this old family Jeep running again. I plan on continuing to work on it and clean it up until I have to return to the city. Here is a picture of the ol' rust-bucket FrankenStudeWillys when I first started working on it. I believe the top is from an old Chevy truck (1940s?).
    Click image for larger version

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    Special thanks to Clark for helping me with my registration problems.

    -Kenneth
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Sounds great. Welcome to the forum.

    Swapping in a Studebaker Champion six used to be common in the Jeep world, but a V-8? Wow! How easily does it steer?
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

    17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
    10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
    10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
    4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
    5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
    56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
    60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
      Sounds great. Welcome to the forum.

      Swapping in a Studebaker Champion six used to be common in the Jeep world, but a V-8? Wow! How easily does it steer?
      Funny thing about that. They couldn't fit the steering box inside the engine compartment so it is currently located between the grill and that big old bumper. My dad couldn't remember too much about it, just that it wouldn't fit and his brother fabricated that mount as well.

      I have only moved about 20 feet in it but the steering is excellent. Easy to turn even while just sitting in it.

      Comment


      • #4
        I admire the modifications performed on the Jeep. Make do with what you have! I like the appearance of the Chevy roof, looks stout and useful. Oh, and the engine sounds good to me!
        sigpic
        In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

        Comment


        • #5
          Plenty of head room for a man in a fedora.
          The engine sounds very good. Studebaker V-8s were one of the most robust and reliable V-8s available back then, and even today. You should have loads of fun in that rig. I really like it.
          Welcome to the Forum. It appears you have already discovered how useful it is.
          Ed Sallia
          Dundee, OR

          Sol Lucet Omnibus

          Comment


          • #6
            That IS a really Cool Jeep! It is the first I have ever heard of a Stude. V8 being used in a Jeep, especially WITH the Floor Shift Jeep Borg Warner Transmission!

            I can think of several ways this could be done, one might be using the Stude. V8 Clutch Housing and drilling and threading Mounting Holes in it for the Transmission.
            That would have to be done Professionally to perfectly Center the Trans.

            That should be one Very Hot, (as in: "get out of the Way"!) little Jeep!
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

            Comment


            • #7
              I love these sorts of posts. I doubt that there's any member of the forum or SDC that doesn't appreciate improvising and innovation in its most utilitarian form. As with any vehicle with a mixed amalgamation of parts, it is important to have a variety of information sources to support the parts. There are manuals available in print and CD that cover your engine. A very important tool would be to obtain those information publications.

              Regarding the engine...the clatter of the solid lifter valve train is normal. If you ever decide to adjust the valves, or hire a mechanic to do the job, be sure to resist the temptation to keep tweaking on the adjusters to make them as quiet as a hydraulic lifter engine. The rhythmic clatter of the Studebaker engine is music to those of us familiar with them. You might be pleased to know that the brakes on the Jeep are adjusted similarly to those of early post-war Studebaker cars & trucks.

              I hope that in some way, we are able to help you preserve this part of your Grandfather's legacy. Who knows...Your Grandfather's vehicle could end up providing you an escape from the city should they begin to fall apart in SD like other parts of the country.
              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

              Comment


              • #8
                Congrats on resurrecting a family heirloom. Your grandfather, dad and uncle were old school, git 'er done guys.

                If there's ever an ugly baby contest, that little pup is the sure and certain winner.

                jack vines
                PackardV8

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Milaca View Post
                  I admire the modifications performed on the Jeep. Make do with what you have! I like the appearance of the Chevy roof, looks stout and useful. Oh, and the engine sounds good to me!


                  My dad and his brother grew up in a town of about 1000 people in Southwest Colorado. The nearest “city” is about a 2 hour drive away. They had to make do with what they had!


                  Originally posted by Commander Eddie View Post
                  Plenty of head room for a man in a fedora.
                  The engine sounds very good. Studebaker V-8s were one of the most robust and reliable V-8s available back then, and even today. You should have loads of fun in that rig. I really like it.
                  Welcome to the Forum. It appears you have already discovered how useful it is.
                  Man, this forum is the coolest part of the internet. Bringing people together to share their love for old cars and specifically rare Studebakers. There really isn't much information about them anywhere else. Even youtube is lacking. I appreciate this forum so much!


                  Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                  That IS a really Cool Jeep! It is the first I have ever heard of a Stude. V8 being used in a Jeep, especially WITH the Floor Shift Jeep Borg Warner Transmission!

                  I can think of several ways this could be done, one might be using the Stude. V8 Clutch Housing and drilling and threading Mounting Holes in it for the Transmission.
                  That would have to be done Professionally to perfectly Center the Trans.

                  That should be one Very Hot, (as in: "get out of the Way"!) little Jeep!


                  StudeRich, you have no idea how many of your posts helped me out. Thank you! For you to say that about this Jeep really makes my day.

                  My uncle took apart his first transmission when he was 16 just to see how it worked. There wasn’t even anything wrong with it! He did all of this himself with a little help from my dad. Currently he is working on dropping a 3.8 turbo charged GNX engine into a 1952 Mg Td. I hope he finishes it because he has been having health problems lately. He is a brilliant and resourceful guy but doesn’t ever have much to say.

                  Originally posted by jclary View Post
                  I love these sorts of posts. I doubt that there's any member of the forum or SDC that doesn't appreciate improvising and innovation in its most utilitarian form. As with any vehicle with a mixed amalgamation of parts, it is important to have a variety of information sources to support the parts. There are manuals available in print and CD that cover your engine. A very important tool would be to obtain those information publications.

                  Regarding the engine...the clatter of the solid lifter valve train is normal. If you ever decide to adjust the valves, or hire a mechanic to do the job, be sure to resist the temptation to keep tweaking on the adjusters to make them as quiet as a hydraulic lifter engine. The rhythmic clatter of the Studebaker engine is music to those of us familiar with them. You might be pleased to know that the brakes on the Jeep are adjusted similarly to those of early post-war Studebaker cars & trucks.

                  I hope that in some way, we are able to help you preserve this part of your Grandfather's legacy. Who knows...Your Grandfather's vehicle could end up providing you an escape from the city should they begin to fall apart in SD like other parts of the country.


                  Thank you for this valuable information. I am so lucky to have the collective knowledge of you guys at my disposal. I have so much to learn.

                  Unfortunately, I currently live in the other SD (San Diego) and I will probably never get to take this Jeep out there with me. It has completely taken my mind off of this crazy situation and is exactly what I needed. I have never worked on an old car before this and I seriously fell in love. My heart was racing when it fired up. One of the best feelings of my life. This Jeep actually belongs to my brother as he made a deal with my uncle to acquire it. I can only hope that he cares for it after I leave. You guys helped my grandfather’s and uncle's legacy live on and I appreciate it so much!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
                    Sounds great. Welcome to the forum.

                    Swapping in a Studebaker Champion six used to be common in the Jeep world, but a V-8? Wow! How easily does it steer?
                    I was surprised to read this and StudeRich's similar comment. Around here, I knew of Jeeps with Studebaker V8s transplanted into them, but never a Studebaker six. One belonged to a local doctor that bought a 1962 Hawk new (he also had Imperials).
                    Gary L.
                    Wappinger, NY

                    SDC member since 1968
                    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by studegary View Post

                      I was surprised to read this and StudeRich's similar comment. Around here, I knew of Jeeps with Studebaker V8s transplanted into them, but never a Studebaker six. One belonged to a local doctor that bought a 1962 Hawk new (he also had Imperials).
                      The Champion is so small and light and cheap, it found its' way into all manner of vehicles. Because the Jeep used the T96, it was a fairly straightforward swap.

                      Currently he is working on dropping a 3.8 turbo charged GNX engine into a 1952 Mg Td.
                      He's set himself on quite a quixotic quest. The MG TD is such a flimsy POS, there's literally no part on it strong enough to withstand that horsepower. BTDT with a SBC. BTW, there's an MG TD in SoCal with a Champion in it.

                      jack vines
                      PackardV8

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Neesh View Post
                        [FONT=Calibri][FONT=Times New Roman]Unfortunately, I currently live in the other SD (San Diego) ...
                        Sorry for the mistake of assuming SD meant South Dakota...no slight toward San Diego intended. My favorite neighbor is from South Dakota and that's probably what put it so steadfast in my mind. But, now that I'm in my mid-70s I feel I have a built-in excuse anyway.

                        One thing to keep in mind is that although there are some really special knowledgeable folks on this forum...not one of us had to pass any test to be here anymore than you did. So...do not sell yourself short nor put the rest of us on any kind of pedestal. I like your enthusiasm and interest in learning. The preparation and work you did to get that engine fired up after such a long period prove you have talent. So, hang around here and contribute to the conversations. After a while, you will develop a sense of who's advice to trust and who's information might need a second opinion (ahem...).


                        John Clary
                        Greer, SC

                        SDC member since 1975

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Kenneth,

                          I would think that would make one terrific stump puller. You could with the V8 and Jeep gearing be able to move a barn from one spot to another. Do you have attachments that go with the Jeep? Plow, Auger to dig a well, mower. Hold on to those if you do..

                          Bob Miles

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            When I was in high school, my dad told me I could have his 48 Jeep station wagon if I wanted it. It had already had a Champion six and then a 232 V8 swapped in previously. I used my savings from my summer job and found a 259 4 barrel engine for it. This was my first real mechanical experience but I got the 259 installed and running. It served as my high school transportation. I think the Stude V8 bolted up to the Jeep transmission but I may be mistaken about this. I do remember that they had to add an extra leaf spring in the front suspension because of the weight of the 232. It was a lot of fun but it was definitely nose heavy.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
                              Congrats on resurrecting a family heirloom. Your grandfather, dad and uncle were old school, git 'er done guys.

                              If there's ever an ugly baby contest, that little pup is the sure and certain winner.

                              jack vines
                              Thanks!

                              Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post

                              He's set himself on quite a quixotic quest. The MG TD is such a flimsy POS, there's literally no part on it strong enough to withstand that horsepower. BTDT with a SBC. BTW, there's an MG TD in SoCal with a Champion in it.

                              jack vines
                              He has always had crazy projects but eventually they all worked out. I don't think he will do over 45 in that car if he ever gets it going. He has always loved that old MG and has owned a handful of Grand Nationals/GNX.

                              Originally posted by jclary View Post

                              Sorry for the mistake of assuming SD meant South Dakota...no slight toward San Diego intended. My favorite neighbor is from South Dakota and that's probably what put it so steadfast in my mind. But, now that I'm in my mid-70s I feel I have a built-in excuse anyway.

                              One thing to keep in mind is that although there are some really special knowledgeable folks on this forum...not one of us had to pass any test to be here anymore than you did. So...do not sell yourself short nor put the rest of us on any kind of pedestal. I like your enthusiasm and interest in learning. The preparation and work you did to get that engine fired up after such a long period prove you have talent. So, hang around here and contribute to the conversations. After a while, you will develop a sense of who's advice to trust and who's information might need a second opinion (ahem...).

                              I understand how it can be confusing. I live in SD (San Diego) but I am visiting my family in SD (South Dakota).

                              And thanks for the vote of confidence.
                              Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post
                              Kenneth,

                              I would think that would make one terrific stump puller. You could with the V8 and Jeep gearing be able to move a barn from one spot to another. Do you have attachments that go with the Jeep? Plow, Auger to dig a well, mower. Hold on to those if you do..

                              Bob Miles
                              Unfortunately, I do not have any of the old attachments. I'll have my dad ask his brother the next time I talk with him.

                              Comment

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