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Retro mod versus old school

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  • Retro mod versus old school

    I had an interesting discussion with a fellow enthusiast. He said the new trend is to retromod because it makes the cars worth more. I disagree because I like my cars as much Studebaker as possible. What are the thoughts of others?

  • #2
    Worth more to who ? Is it retro mod or resto mod ? What do you consider old school ? Just don't know exactly how to answer. I am in the last stages of building a 53 coupe , and it's what I call a old school hot rod. My car is probably worth a lot more to me than anyone would pay. If you're building one to sell it's different.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by LovelandJoe View Post
      I had an interesting discussion with a fellow enthusiast. He said the new trend is to retromod because it makes the cars worth more. I disagree because I like my cars as much Studebaker as possible. What are the thoughts of others?
      My thought is what someone else does with their car is their business. If a restomod car is worth more to the owner because they can drive it across the country in air conditioned comfort without worrying about vapor lock (for example}, then that's great. If your car is worth more to you fully original, then that's great too.
      Paul
      Winston-Salem, NC
      Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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      • #4
        Doesn't matter if it's a resto-retro-mod or a restoration, very few will ever sell for anywhere near the cost of a professional build.

        I've done so many cars over the past sixty years, I've lost count, but that gives me a perspective on cost-to-build versus sold-at-auction. Watch Barrett-Jackson, Mecom or any of the big auctions. You'll see beautiful cars selling for less than one-third of the cost to build.

        One other consideration; a restoration is what it was. With a resto-rod, the imagination goes wild. I've watched mission-creep take resto-rods way past $100,000 before the wife figured it out and said '"Whoa!" There are many resto-mod Studebakers which cost $250,000 and up to build.

        Whether a restoration or a resto-rod, never, ever, keep receipts or a running total of the cost. That way lies divorce or at the very least, chagrin.

        jack vines
        PackardV8

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        • #5
          I'll go back and ask the same questions I asked the OP. How does everyone describe a 1. Restomod, and 2. Oldschool. I too have been building cars a long time,,since 1957. Back then if they were not original they were called hot rods. As time passed on, the modifieds, the restomods , the old school hot rods, and the rats came to be. What's in your mind ??? Whats the difference!! I know what i'm thinkin'!! What youall thinkin"??

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          • #6
            The problem with resto mods is they tend to be built with the owner in mind and not who else may like it. I’ve gotten some nasty comments on Facebook because S2D has a corvette 327 and not a studebaker engine. A restoration is how the factory intended but then you get purists going crazy If the seat pattern is the wrong direction or wrong trim piece was used. Build it because you like it and definitely don’t count the receipts. Keep them but def don’t add the numbers together.

            I will say restomods May be more desirable to more people because they can truly be driven anywhere and probably serviced by most mechanics. I’ve gotten two flat no’s already when I inquired about getting someone to look at S2D. The mechanic would would look at the yellow one is backed up working on classic cars I gave up and am learning as I go.

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            • #7
              It takes research and a lot of money to do a correct restoration...tracking down parts that are elusive at best and may be no better shape than what you already have...fabrication of other parts. It's often much easier and possibly cheaper to do a resto-mod with much more easily found modern parts.
              Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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              • #8
                Two thoughts. My Commander is going to be a restomod. Blown V6, GM automatic, Ford 9", four wheel disc brakes, etc. It's look like a sleeper and close to stock. The Daytona will take a different tact. Stude V8, a 4-Speed and Dana 44. Dick once mentioned that the '54 was built as if he had any money when in high school in '64. I'm using the same idea. Old school hot rod.
                Tom - Bradenton, FL

                1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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                • #9
                  I'm always struck by the question, which course of action to take. My question is why take any action at all? In today's hobby the only way to insure that you don't loose your shirt is to maintain thae car as a serviceable driver. If a car needs a full restoration, and you choose to do the work, it had better be a labor of love because expecting to make money, or even break even, is a crap shoot. Even then it depends on the make, model, condition and the amount of work required.

                  People who think that they can somehow cheat by doing a restomod, because there is no defining guide lines to follow, are fooling themselves because they have a creation which appeals to a limited market. People who want a restomad generally will not accept the vision of another. In other words they want to do it their way. People can point to the exceptions, but that's all they are. For me it's much easier to handicap an original car, because it is a known quantity.

                  Bill

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by J_Cole View Post
                    ...I’ve gotten some nasty comments on Facebook because S2D has a corvette 327 and not a studebaker engine...

                    I will say restomods May be more desirable to more people because they can truly be driven anywhere and probably serviced by most mechanics. I’ve gotten two flat no’s already when I inquired about getting someone to look at S2D. The mechanic would would look at the yellow one is backed up working on classic cars I gave up and am learning as I go.
                    On the first point - criticism of S2D is just bananas.
                    The person can't see what S2D really is - BOTH!
                    All the Studebaker stuff present was restored to a better than new standard, yet it is Resto-mod circa 1965.

                    When I saw Dick's custom Kart Hauler, the execution was so integrated and to such a high standard, it looked like Studebaker should have built it.

                    You are very correct that a resto-mod with modern components is less maintenance and can be serviced most anywhere. Add the comfort and dependability factor and you have a much wider buyer's pool.

                    No doubt many on this forum and beyond are capable of building and maintaining highly dependable, strong performing vehicles, but it does require more time and some specialized knowledge, skills and tools (hub puller?) OR the ability to communicate that knowledge and care to a competent mechanic humble enough to accept that communication.

                    Thing is, we've all seen great and poor executions of both based on taste, skill and components so it just boils down to preference.
                    Andy
                    62 GT

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                    • #11
                      Opinions about cars are just like the cars. No two are exactly alike and you may not like the other guy's. For my part, I don't worry about what anyone else calls their car. Any vehicle other than like the factory made it, is modified. The names people come up with to put in magazines are just an attempt to rename something that has been around since the first guy changed something on his car. The value is up to the buyer and seller.
                      "In the heart of Arkansas."
                      Searcy, Arkansas
                      1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                      1952 2R pickup

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                      • #12
                        Andy,

                        I just wonder if you are aware of the whole story of the "Car Hauler"? It transcends Dick's restoration by at least four decades. I'm not trying in any way to demean the work that Dick did. What he accomplish with the car allowed for it to be rediscovered by the car world.

                        Excuse my ignorance Mr. Cole but what is "S2D," is that some special code for a car with which we are supposed to know? I don't believe that I have ever criticized anyone for doing what they wanted to any post war Studebaker. No post war Studebaker is rare enough or valuable enough to make a huge difference. I do however take umbrage when someone makes a statement like, "I will say restomods May be more desirable to more people because they can truly be driven anywhere and probably serviced by most mechanics." Both of the statements are false, on their face. The implication that Studebaker technology is both more antiquated and less reliable then other sixty year old technology, that we often find substituted for original equipment, is laughable. I just want someone to be honest and say that they just want to make the change, because it will be more appealing to a certain segment of the hobby. I've driven Studebakers for over a third of a million miles and can vouch for their reliability. So folks please don't patronize me, and don't embarrass yourself, just be honest.

                        Bill
                        Last edited by Hallabutt; 06-08-2020, 01:18 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LovelandJoe View Post
                          He said the new trend is to retromod because it makes the cars worth more.
                          I think the popularity of restomoding is mainly because it's easier and quicker to do than a proper restoration and much much easier/cheaper than an authentic all-original restoration -- so it is attractive for a business I suppose. I personally think most restomods are have a shelf life by which they must sell to make a profit or recoup the money put into them unless the customization is done by someone important or famous. Having said that, I do love some restomods (Studebakers and others) that are delightfully done and I think that's down to my tastes matching the tastes of the builder.



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                          • #14
                            Getting to the original point: are they worth more?

                            I don't like admitting it but YES they sometimes are, to SOME PEOPLE who pay those crazy prices for them on Barrett Jackson and other venues.

                            BUT, I did say "Some People" and that certainly is NOT everyone!

                            As mentioned "Those people" are not interested in the value of Original, they want Air Cond, 100 Watt Surround Sound Stereo, Cruise Control, Tilt Steering, Leather Heated Reclining Seats with Shoulder Harnesses, 400+ HP, Automatic Overdrive, 4 Wheel Disc Power Brakes etc. all in a Classic looking '50's or '60's Car.

                            And there IS value in being able to stop at any Parts store and getting maintenance or replacement Parts from the shelf for a lot of Newer Car parts on their Classic Studebaker.

                            So again, it's NOT for EVERYONE!
                            StudeRich
                            Second Generation Stude Driver,
                            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                            • #15
                              You're right Rich, I guess that if we lived in a place that air conditioning was considered essential, I wanted all the other creature comforts, that I was willing to do the engineering required, contribute the financial resources, willing to give up the safety features of a newer car, I was going to be driving the car on a regular enough basis that "upgrades" would be worth while, I would not tire of the car, and that I was willing to risk take the financial hit when I sold it, I guess that I would go for it. Then there are personal considerations like my age the number of years I have left to drive etc. Ok I'm convinced! I just hope that Joe can check off more of the boxes then I did!

                              Bill

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