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Cost to rebuild a 289

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  • what huh
    replied
    Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post
    Witmer's shop is a shop that I would want to take my car if I had to get repair work done. It is so clean and I don't see lots of used greasy parts lying around. If a shop keeps things clean and organized, I know the built would be great.

    Bob Miles
    My father in law knows him and I have meet him twice. Nice guy, very quite. He has a Golden Hawk that can shake the earth. There is a lot of engine work on that 352.

    His shop is always clean the times I have been there anyways. I keeping him in mind when I start to rebuild my 352 cause I hope to ask him some questions and maybe bring him some work if he would like it

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  • studepickups
    replied
    There are a lot of good Studebaker Venders in our club. some advertise in Turning Wheels and some do not. If you are having difficulty choosing read about my work at my website. http://www.studebakervendors.com/jensen/index.htm
    I keep an inventory of Long blocks in stock and am fairly close to you. My contact information is on the web page.

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  • swvalcon
    replied
    Plee You know you could have taken that car loaded it on a trailer hauled it a couple hundred miles and saved thousands.

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  • plee4139
    replied
    I realize what I paid for a complete overhaul, plus reworking of the cooling system which caused the engine to fail after only 15k miles on the rebuild, at 10k total, is far beyond the numbers seen here, but this is Long Island, a great place to live, but more expensive than many other areas. It's now been bored out to .060 and has plenty of power. Such is the life of an old car owner, I suppose.

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  • Hawklover
    replied
    Originally posted by rbarvai View Post
    My 64 Daytona's 259 engine is tired, needs a valve job and probably more. I have a 289 that came with the car when I bought it a few months ago, and I'm thinking of swapping out the 259 for the 289. I have no idea what the condition of the 289 is and would certainly want to have it rebuilt before swapping.

    Before I go this route, I'd like some idea of a typical cost to rebuilt one of these engines. I realize it will depend on a number of factors, but what would be a reasonable range to consider? This will help determine whether I go ahead with the project.

    Thanks, Rich
    Rich back in 1995 I had my R-1 rebuilt............the total cost was $3,000.00

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  • 6hk71400
    replied
    Witmer's shop is a shop that I would want to take my car if I had to get repair work done. It is so clean and I don't see lots of used greasy parts lying around. If a shop keeps things clean and organized, I know the built would be great.

    Bob Miles

    Leave a comment:


  • candbstudebakers
    replied
    Good advice given by all and remember good cost money better cost more.

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  • 62champ
    replied
    Since you are in Gettysburg, PA, you might want to try Witmer's in Ephrata, PA. They specialize in Studebaker, have owner Studebakers for years, and are pretty close to you. Photos below are from the front of their place and a motor a friend had rebuilt by them we were picking up.



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  • Bish
    replied
    There's also Dave Thibault in Massachusetts who has a good reputation. He advertises in TW.

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    Originally posted by DieselJim View Post
    The quotes are just that until the engine is taken apart. $3200.00 to $3600.00 is general cost. Last name is Maxey.
    X2, Jim; no one can give a firm quote until the parts are cleaned and checked. Until then, it's just a rough estimate.

    It's all just time and money; decide how much of each you are prepared to spend. Agree first on the goals and budget; if cheapest good runner with reused parts, better runner with all new parts, best runner with precision machine work.

    When asking for estimates, it's critical to agree on exactly what is to be done. Does the shop want the complete engine or just the long block? Will the block and heads be pressure washed and shot blasted? New pistons, rings, bearings, valves, springs, guides be installed? Will the heads be surfaced? The block be line honed and square decked? Rocker shafts disassembled and rodded out? Oil pump rebuilt? Front damper rebuilt? Will the rotating assembly be balanced? Cam, lifters, crankshaft, rocker arms and flywheel reground? How long will the shop need to complete the work, worst case? Do they require some or all payment up front? (BTW, too much up front is a red flag.)

    jack vines

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  • DieselJim
    replied
    The quotes are just that until the engine is taken apart. $3200.00 to $3600.00 is general cost. Last name is Maxey.

    Leave a comment:


  • PackardV8
    replied
    Originally posted by swvalcon View Post
    Joe makes some very good points. The first thing you need to do is disassemble the 289. Lay it all out and look it over for any damage and wear. Mic everything out, Check cyl.wear and same goes for crank. Now you have a good idea what it needs and which way you can go about it. If everything checks with in specs. all you need is a over haul. If it is totally wore out now it needs a reman. And get out the old check book. It's going to hurt.
    For true, it all has to be evaluated. Much depends upon how the engine was operated, maintained and ultimately stored. We recently pulled down a 289" with pistons so stuck they had to be broken out of the bores. The crankshaft was perfect.

    Add to the list of parts to be micrometer checked, valve stems and valve guides, oil pump.

    jack vines

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  • swvalcon
    replied
    Joe makes some very good points. The first thing you need to do is disassemble the 289. Lay it all out and look it over for any damage and wear. Mic everything out, Check cyl.wear and same goes for crank. Now you have a good idea what it needs and which way you can go about it. If everything checks with in specs. all you need is a over haul. If it is totally wore out now it needs a reman. And get out the old check book. It's going to hurt.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeHall
    replied
    Originally posted by GrumpyOne View Post
    Before you can make a decision or receive reliable advice, Questions such as engine mileage, origin and future intent etc should be answered.

    In my limited experience, every engine I have worked on had no more than a 100k on the clock and all did very well with just a simple overhaul.

    I've dealt with perhaps a dozen or so engines during my lifetime but your mileage may vary...
    Agree, there is rebuild, and there is overhaul. To rebuild is to make it new again in every respect; to overhaul is to inspect and repair only as necessary, and there's several things to consider in choosing which route to take. If it's a low mile, non abused motor and inspection determines it's a good candidate, an overhaul may even be preferred under some conditions. For example, in the desert southwest factory spec piston to cylinder clearance takes many more break-in miles to cool down, and three's even damage of piston galling if not careful during break-in. Whereas an overhauled motor can hit the road running without much concern for overheating due to internal tightness. OTOH, overhauling a high mileage, abused motor is a waste of time and $, unless planning to flip the car to some unlucky buyer.

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  • GrumpyOne
    replied
    Before you can make a decision or receive reliable advice, Questions such as engine mileage, origin and future intent etc should be answered.

    In my limited experience, every engine I have worked on had no more than a 100k on the clock and all did very well with just a simple overhaul.

    I've dealt with perhaps a dozen or so engines during my lifetime but your mileage may vary...

    Leave a comment:

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