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1959 Studebaker 4x4 on Four wheeler.com and in Four Wheeler

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  • 1959 Studebaker 4x4 on Four wheeler.com and in Four Wheeler

    Just an FYI that the story on Terry Johnson's '59 4E7D is up at Fourwheeler,com and will be in print soon in Four Wheeler magazine. It's an awesome truck and was fresh out of Ron Reichhart's shop. It's at Terry's place now and I imagine that when the "Viropalooza" is over, you may see it at some shows. As always, thanks to the Studely crowd for inspiration and consultation.

    This 1959 Studebaker 4E7D 4x4 1/2-ton V-8 is one of only nine produced.
    Jim Allen

    Soldier, sailor, auto tech, off-road driving instructor, photographer, magazine writer, book author, farmer, aspiring curmudgeon.

  • #2
    It's a good article, and a beautiful truck. Too bad the upper brass at Studebaker let the truck market slip through their fingers.

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    • #3
      IMHO an extremely handsome example which should be parked and used regularly as it was intended on my property.
      Cheers, Bill

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      • #4
        Tried that Buzzard... didn't work. Terry is too smart. Thing drives like new. Probably better than new. Terry says he drives his collection, so it won't be a hanger queen.
        Jim Allen

        Soldier, sailor, auto tech, off-road driving instructor, photographer, magazine writer, book author, farmer, aspiring curmudgeon.

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        • #5
          Great truck, great article.
          Don Wilson, Centralia, WA

          40 Champion 4 door*
          50 Champion 2 door*
          53 Commander K Auto*
          53 Commander K overdrive*
          55 President Speedster
          62 GT 4Speed*
          63 Avanti R1*
          64 Champ 1/2 ton

          * Formerly owned

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          • #6
            Very nice job on a very nice truck. However, I have a couple of minor nitpicks.
            1. Under origins, this phrase is not quite correct (depending on how you define the word "heavy"): "by 1959 the only heavy trucks the company built were for military contracts". Actually Stude continued to build 2-ton HD (24,000 GVW) trucks to the end of production in December 1963. I would characterize them as medium or medium-heavy.
            2. The first photo caption states that the deluxe package got one a left arm rest. The left arm rest was standard equipment; the right one came with deluxe. It also implies that a headliner came with the deluxe package. They all had (cheap) headliners; I believe deluxe got you one that matched the color of the seat upholstery.
            3. Second caption states that the fiberglass grille was developed for the 1958 models. It was for the 1957 models, as was correctly stated later.
            4. This statement is off by about a year: " Early in the '60s, hard marketing work brought Studebaker sales up a bit". Actually, it was the introduction of the 1959 Lark in late 1958 that brought up Stude sales. By late 1960, sales were in a decline that they would never recover from.
            5. The Transtar name debuted in 1956 (not 1957), a year before the fiberglass grille.
            Skip Lackie

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            • #7
              [QUOTE=Skip Lackie;n1831609]
              1. Under origins, this phrase is not quite correct (depending on how you define the word "heavy"): "by 1959 the only heavy trucks the company built were for military contracts". Actually Stude continued to build 2-ton HD (24,000 GVW) trucks to the end of production in December 1963. I would characterize them as medium or medium-heavy.

              Medium ends somewhere around 2.5 to 3-tons by most truck sources I have reviewed and that's the measure I have always used. Two tons are medium in my style manual.

              2. The first photo caption states that the deluxe package got one a left arm rest. The left arm rest was standard equipment; the right one came with deluxe. It also implies that a headliner came with the deluxe package. They all had (cheap) headliners; I believe deluxe got you one that matched the color of the seat upholstery.

              Yeah, armrest dyslexia. Whoops! That was the case with most trucks of the era. Deluxe got you the right armrest.

              Headliners: The literature I used for source material (old brochures and many things From Fred Fox, ) gave me the impression the base trucks didn't have a headliner. I haven't seen enough Studebaker trucks in my career to have noted all the variations and the options lists led me to think the base trucks had no headliner. Again, whoops!


              4. This statement is off by about a year: " Early in the '60s, hard marketing work brought Studebaker sales up a bit". Actually, it was the introduction of the 1959 Lark in late 1958 that brought up Stude sales. By late 1960, sales were in a decline that they would never recover from.

              That's essentially what I (thought) I was saying. When '60 dawned, some at Studebaker probably thought a corner had been turned and the sun was going to rise again.

              5. The Transtar name debuted in 1956 (not 1957), a year before the fiberglass grille.

              From reading Fed Fox, I had the impression "Transtar" debuted FOR the 1957 model year truck... which would have debuted in 1956. If that's the case, I stand by 1957. If not, I stand corrected. I've been in many arguments over model year versus calendar year and decided that I am tired of having to explain it every time I write it (not to mention I'm space constrained in magazines) so model year is my default and I just have to presume the reader understands the difference.

              Jim Allen

              Soldier, sailor, auto tech, off-road driving instructor, photographer, magazine writer, book author, farmer, aspiring curmudgeon.

              Comment


              • #8
                The headliners were junky cardboard on all 49-64 C-cab trucks, and are rarely found intact today -- but they all had them when the trucks left the plant. Beginning with the 1957 3E-series models, the parts book shows one or two colors (gray or beige) for C2 cabs, and various colors for C4 (deluxe) cabs. Prior to the 1957 models, there was usually only one possible color for each year.

                The Transtar name first appeared on the 1956 2E-series models, one year before the fiberglass grille was introduced. This sentence appears in the Stude truck history on the main SDC web site: "More noticeable was the taller, more rounded hood with a large Studebaker emblem cut into it in front, and the fact that the entire Studebaker truck line had a model name: 'Transtar'."

                http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com...uckHistory.asp
                Skip Lackie

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                • #9
                  I believe that we had a chance meeting with Terry at the SCD meet hotel (La Quinta). I would just like to know if this is the same truck that lived most of it's life in the PNW?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hallabutt View Post
                    I believe that we had a chance meeting with Terry at the SCD meet hotel (La Quinta). I would just like to know if this is the same truck that lived most of it's life in the PNW?
                    The truck was from Springfield, Massachusetts. Terry lives in Iowa. Not saying you didn't see him at a meet but he just got the Studebaker truck back from the resto in December of '19 but I don't know if it's been out an about since.
                    Jim Allen

                    Soldier, sailor, auto tech, off-road driving instructor, photographer, magazine writer, book author, farmer, aspiring curmudgeon.

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                    • #11
                      My mistake, the gentleman was from Ohio and he also had a 4x4.
                      Bill

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