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  • Epoxy primer.

    Just wanted to show some of these pictures I took today. Any one who has seen any of my posts on here know I am a big supporter of SPI. paint products. This is the rust bucket body shell and frame off my 64 hawk that I was going to cut up and scrap. In a weak moment on a day when I had nothing going on I decided to save it and use the left over parts off the 62 parts car that I used the frame and body shell on rebuilding the 64 GT. I had to set it outside while doing other projects. It was welded up and used Rustoleum cold galvanizing spray bomb primer and undercoat on the inside and SPI epoxy primer on the outside. It was covered with a cloth car cover and sat outside though two MN winters and one summer though snow, rain and what ever mother nature though at it. It has not one spot of rust bleed though on the outside or any signs of any rust issues and only a little surface rust in the bottoms of the rear foot wells that will need too be looked at.

  • #2
    Show me how it dry sands. Show me 180, or 240 grit dry paper after you swipe it across. But the caveat is not on two year old paint, but two day old primer. Then I'll pass judgement on how good it is. I never seen an epoxy primer that can sand except one. I'm willing to be converted if you can show that.
    Bez Auto Alchemy
    573-318-8948
    http://bezautoalchemy.com


    "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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    • #3
      Bezhawk try it you can sand it the next day. I've even sanded it with 180 or 240 on a da. If I was to sand this after almost 2 years dry time it would powder just like 2k. A lot of the corvette guy's have switched to this for their primer and don't even use a 2k as a fill prime if you use it unreduced . It fills that well. Has as I remember right a 72 hour pot life. After it's completely cured you will be there a long time trying to wash it off with lacquer thinner. This is the closest thing I have seen to the old DP before they changed the formula to no lead.
      Last edited by swvalcon; 03-22-2020, 11:34 AM.

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      • #4
        Well, I'm happy for you. I used PCL 2K Seal N' Prime on a car roof that I sanded to bare metal and liberally used Phosphoric Acid anywhere there was a hint of rust. I mean like 5-10 times it was treated and inspected wearing my Optivisor. I then applied 3 coats of the primer and while not in a garage the car was covered overhead. Within 4 months a significant amount of rust bleed through. At least the "seal" part of the product did not work for me.
        '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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        • #5
          Wittsend What I did was sand to bare metal using 40 and 80 grit sand paper. Anywhere there where pits I hit good with a grinder with 24 grit and spot blasted with a small hand sand blaster I bought maybe 45 years ago and still use today. Then I primed with the spi epoxy and let it cure good. None of this prime and top coat in 20 min. crap. After at least a overnight dry time and sometimes it ended up being days. I scuff sanded did my filler work and recoated those areas with epoxy. Then I did my 2k priming and block sanding. After that I gave it maybe three coats of epoxy and after it had dry for some time I needed the spot in the shop for other work so want to or not it had to go outside and one thing lead to another and its going on a good year and a half and looks like maybe some time this next week I can get it back in the shop to go back to work on it. I can not see anywhere where the weather has any ill effects on any of it other than the rear foot wells on the inside and I'm sure that is from melted snow and rain water running in there and just sitting until it disappeared or found a way out. wont be a big thing to clean up and reprimer and undercoat before carpet goes in.

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          • #6
            Thank you for the detailed process. In my case I used paint remover and I think my final sanding was 240-320 (can't remember). I did not intend to paint the car for some time hoping the PCL Prime N' Seal lived up to the reputation of not being porous. Anyway, as mentioned before I was able to get around to painting the rust appeared. Sad because I had intended the Seal N' Prime to halt the rust but after all the effort it only continued. Thank you for your reply.
            '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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            • #7
              I love SPI epoxy primer. Once dry enough to block sand, it has a satin sheen to it. When block sanding it's like having guide coat but you don't need to guide coat. You can see any high or low spot just from the sheen. SPI does not recommend using any phosphoric acid for rust removal. If you do, you need to scrub it with Dawn soap and water before it dries. I'd scrub it several times. That phosphoric acid will react with whatever you put of top of it, eventually. If you have heavily pitted rust it really needs to be sandblasted for best results. One other thing about SPI epoxy; if you're doing a frame or the underside in black, it's satin sheen and there is no need to topcoat.

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              • #8
                50Ragtop That's what I used on my frame after sand blasting. Another nice thing about it is easy to touch up if need be.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 50Ragtop View Post
                  I love SPI epoxy primer. Once dry enough to block sand, it has a satin sheen to it. When block sanding it's like having guide coat but you don't need to guide coat. You can see any high or low spot just from the sheen. SPI does not recommend using any phosphoric acid for rust removal. If you do, you need to scrub it with Dawn soap and water before it dries. I'd scrub it several times. That phosphoric acid will react with whatever you put of top of it, eventually. If you have heavily pitted rust it really needs to be sandblasted for best results. One other thing about SPI epoxy; if you're doing a frame or the underside in black, it's satin sheen and there is no need to topcoat.
                  The only problem is that sandblasting will not remove all the microscopic pits of rust, and they will come back to haunt you if you don't do either: (1) use phosphoric acid, Naval Jelly, etc. to remove the tiny rust pits, or (2) use a non-porous primer like POR-15. Just because you can't see any rust after sandblasting doesn't mean that it isn't there. I found that out the hard way many years ago.
                  -Dwight
                  Last edited by Dwight FitzSimons; 04-06-2020, 06:47 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Isn't Epoxy Primer non-porous? It can be used on suspensions with NO top coat.

                    I stopped using phosphoric acid 30 years ago....
                    Frank DuVal

                    50 Commander 4 door

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                    • #11
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                      Official stance on phosphoric acid products from SPI website

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                      • #12
                        Maybe that's my problem. It's been about thirty years since I did any substantive paint work. Some of the paint work I did more the forty years ago, and used Ospho on, I still own. How soon should I expect to see the inevitable paint failure to occur?
                        Bill

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                        • #13
                          I'll have to give it a try..

                          However, since I usually have the bodies pro media blasted, they offer eletro static powder coating primer.

                          This stuff gets in every hole and then some as if it was dipped. Pricey, but you can leave it out side until ready to work on it.


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                          • #14
                            SScopelli Nice. But I lived in Phoenix for a couple years. You could almost leave bare metal outside there until ready to work on it. I liked the weather there but couldn't handle all the out of state crooks.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Frank DuVal View Post
                              Isn't Epoxy Primer non-porous? It can be used on suspensions with NO top coat.

                              I stopped using phosphoric acid 30 years ago....
                              The development and refinement of epoxy primers have been a true game-changer in painting technology and procedures. I love the stuff, but just like Superman, it has its own "Kryptonite"... known as UV rays/light. So, I would never use epoxy as a top coat...even on a chassis. Here's a link that covers it fairly well...

                              https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...jYINv2Z-RhL769
                              John Clary
                              Greer, SC

                              SDC member since 1975

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