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Champ engine disappointment

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  • Mark L
    replied
    Dwight, were you able to get the casting date codes added to the Resources page? Over the past few days I've been working with a gentleman who contacted me outside the Forum and requested my help identifying the year/displacement of a 6-cylinder engine in his 1947 Willys that he was told was a Studebaker. I did a lot of searching through the Forum, and I believe I now know how to read the casting date codes. I even created a document for myself so I could refer to it (got it done before I found this thread), but it would have been a lot easier had I not had to reinvent the wheel.

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  • Dwight FitzSimons
    replied
    Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
    Dwight-
    Good. Dunno for sure. Suggest you contact Clark. He can point you in the right direction. Or use the "contact us" box down at the bottom.
    I'll check into it.
    -Dwight

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  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    Dwight-
    Good. Dunno for sure. Suggest you contact Clark. He can point you in the right direction. Or use the "contact us" box down at the bottom.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dwight FitzSimons
    replied
    Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post

    Dwight-
    Are your casting number data in a form that they could be added to the "Resources" section of the SDC home page? Seems like these questions come up pretty frequently and your info would be a useful addition to the archive.
    Yes, the info consists of text & tables in a Word 2007 document, and has been converted to PDF. What's my next step to add it to the Resources section of the SDC home page?
    -Dwight

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  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    Originally posted by Dwight FitzSimons View Post

    PM sent. Also, I will look up any numbers for anyone, for any year Studebaker back to the twenties..
    -Dwight
    Dwight-
    Are your casting number data in a form that they could be added to the "Resources" section of the SDC home page? Seems like these questions come up pretty frequently and your info would be a useful addition to the archive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dwight FitzSimons
    replied
    Originally posted by ChampCouple View Post

    I might note some numbers, if you wouldn't mind checking them for me.

    Thanks,
    Mike
    PM sent. Also, I will look up any numbers for anyone, for any year Studebaker back to the twenties..
    -Dwight

    Leave a comment:


  • ChampCouple
    replied
    That is a very nice looking Champ! Thanks for the information on it Rob, and thanks for the photo 62champ!

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    Wow, that Champ is drop dead Gorgeous! They just don't get much better, perfect or correct than that.
    It even has the would have been 1965, never factory installed, "Studebaker" embossed Deluxe Grille!

    The only thing I would have done different is the move the Radio Antenna to the correct side, easy to fix BEFORE restoration, not so much After.
    Last edited by StudeRich; 12-21-2019, 01:19 PM.

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  • 62champ
    replied
    Rob is pretty modest about how well his Dad's truck looks - this is that same truck at the AACA museum in Hershey, PA, for the big Studebaker exhibit.

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  • stude1964
    replied
    I feel your pain about numbers matching however my Dad and I found a forlorn '63/4 Champ in a farmer's field. It had an anemic 6 cyl. in it which we beat to death. We found a rot bucket late Champ with a V-8 and T-85 OD. We never looked back! The truck now has factory A/C, power steering and soon power brakes from a late Lark. Our thought was to build it the way we would have bought it when new. The truck looks and drives better than new and is safer. All parts used were period correct Stude parts. The only incorrect part is the exhaust -duals from Don Simmons for the AFB to breathe. Once your truck is back on the road you'll appreciate it more regardless of the engine. The point is that it's back on the road for you and others to enjoy. My Dad is no longer here but I feel he is with us when taking the truck and his Avanti out for some exercise. I hope you feel the same way.
    Rob in PA.

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  • ChampCouple
    replied
    Originally posted by Dwight FitzSimons View Post

    This is exactly true. I have compiled a list of engine casting date codes for Studebakers from the 1920s to 1964. I can provide that to anyone who asks.
    -Dwight
    I might note some numbers, if you wouldn't mind checking them for me.

    Thanks,
    Mike

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  • Son O Lark
    replied
    Even if the engine number matched, that does not guarantee it is the original engine.

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  • BobWaitz
    replied
    Originally posted by 8E45E View Post

    It wasn't only Government agencies that maintained their vehicle fleet with engines and other components cannibalized from scrapped units from their surplus fleet. Besides many transit systems which cannibalize their out-of-service buses to keep newer ones on the road, U-Haul also did the same for years and years. Now with tighter emissions testing, and safety regulations, I don't believe this done as often as in was in the past.

    Craig
    This is well-known in British motorcycle circles: It certainly was the same deal with war-department motorcycles in England during WWII. Rather than spend time rebuilding the engine on a BSA M20 and keeping it out of service, they'd swap engines and rebuild the bad unit while keeping the bike on the road. It would totally make sense for a state police department to swap out an engine to keep the vehicle on the road rather than sidelining to while the engine is rebuilt.

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
    I just 're'-read all the replies and one of your own replies makes an interesting point.
    I'd bet an Oregon donut the engine was changed at one time or another by the service department at the Oregon State Police, (or possibly the Studebaker dealership if it was still within the warranty period).
    Government vehicles tend to get some hard use and an engine change would not be out of the ordinary.
    It wasn't only Government agencies that maintained their vehicle fleet with engines and other components cannibalized from scrapped units from their surplus fleet. Besides many transit systems which cannibalize their out-of-service buses to keep newer ones on the road, U-Haul also did the same for years and years. Now with tighter emissions testing, and safety regulations, I don't believe this done as often as in was in the past.

    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    I just 're'-read all the replies and one of your own replies makes an interesting point.
    I'd bet an Oregon donut the engine was changed at one time or another by the service department at the Oregon State Police, (or possibly the Studebaker dealership if it was still within the warranty period).
    Government vehicles tend to get some hard use and an engine change would not be out of the ordinary.


    I was hoping to restore the pickup back to its Oregon State Police days.

    Leave a comment:

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