Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Did any Studebaker wagons or carriages use Ackerman steering?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Did any Studebaker wagons or carriages use Ackerman steering?

    Even the earliest cars used steering knuckles on each side with tie rods, essentially an Ackerman-type design which allowed the front wheels to turn at slightly different angles, including the first Studebaker electrics. This minimizes side slip of the tires, especially at lower speeds. The basics were developed about 1817 and refined by 1878. Wagons and carriages for the last few thousand years use a "turntable" design that pivots the whole front axle, resulting in the wheels having to slip sideways a little in a turn. A few years ago, I did see a modern horse-drawn steel carriage with Ackerman steering - and disk brakes at the rear - wish I had taken a photo. Generally, with turntable steering, the front wheels need to go under the carriage body to reduce the turn radius, but this forces the carriage body to sit high even when the front wheels are smaller or the carriage body has to be very narrow.

    Did Studebaker ever build carriages or wagons with Ackerman steering? I must be missing something about the pro's and con's of Ackerman steering because even modern carriages mostly still use turntable steering. Modern race cars tend to use steering that is not 100% Ackerman because of tire behavior at high speed in turns, but that's another story. The carriage below is a Studebaker.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Studebaker carriage.jpg Views:	0 Size:	134.5 KB ID:	1809531
    Gary Ash
    Dartmouth, Mass.

    '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
    ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
    '48 M5
    '65 Wagonaire Commander
    '63 Wagonaire Standard
    web site at http://www.studegarage.com

  • #2
    Not really Ackerman, but I read somewhere years ago where Studebaker used "Two axle steering" on their wagons. The rear axle was connected to the front axle and turned the opposite way. They said it was so the rear wheels would follow in the ruts of the front wheels.
    GM thought they had come up with something new a few years ago, NOT!
    Jerry Forrester
    Forrester's Chrome
    Douglasville, Georgia

    See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

    Comment


    • #3
      Jerry -

      You strongly hint that Studebaker designed said (noted by you) steering.
      Is that "fact" or did Studebaker copy this supposid design from another wagon manufacturer..? Like somewhere back in the Roman days..!

      Mike

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
        Jerry -

        You strongly hint that Studebaker designed said (noted by you) steering.
        Is that "fact" or did Studebaker copy this supposid design from another wagon manufacturer..? Like somewhere back in the Roman days..!

        Mike
        Mike, I guess I should have worded my post differently. I didn't mean to imply that Studebaker invented that steering setup. I just meant they used it. It would probably be difficult to prove who was the first to use it.
        Jerry Forrester
        Forrester's Chrome
        Douglasville, Georgia

        See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

        Comment

        Working...
        X