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  • Looking to someday buy Stude truck...questions.

    Okay...here goes! I was driving through town the other day and drove by an old Chevy pickup. 1950-51 vintage. It was snowing, and the truck was in..."rough" shape. Driveable, road-worthy, but a little rusty with faded, oxidized paint. When I saw it, I thought to myself...Wow..that is pretty cool!
    I have always had a special place in my heart for old, used work trucks, especially from the 1948-1956 vintage. I think I have finally decided to seek after a Studebaker truck from that time period that I would like to use just as that...a work truck. Something that I would not feel guilty driving in the rain or snow, or throwing scrap metal or a couch in the box and scratching it up. (now if I can only convince my wife[B)])

    Anyhow, I was wondering, what am I going to expect to spend on a running, road worthy 49-56 Stude truck in less than average shape? I am not looking for anything special, a little rust doesn't bother me as long as the frame is solid. (since I will be driving it in adverse Iowa weather, I will be washing it regularly to prevent any further rust, but I don't want to start with something in good shape that will just end up ugly in three years or so) I have no illusions, I know I am going to have to save up some money in order to purchase one, probably for more than a year, but I figure I should start somewhere, you know, do some homework.
    Thanks in advance for your input!


    1963 Lark Custom, 259 V8, TT, 4 doors, 2 tone paint. Driven often, always noticed. Man I love this car!!
    Edited for spelling

  • #2
    Based on what I've seen, expect to pay $4-6K for a "driver" and then it'll be on the wrong coast so add $1500 for shipping

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel
    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

    Comment


    • #3
      I paid $3500 for mine a couple of years ago. It had a rebuilt champion six with 3 sp/OD on the column. Cosmetically it was all there but bent on all corners. Lots of surface rust and patina. Broken windows and worn rubber and felt. I was going to rat rod paint it and keep it for a truck as you described, but I got carried away.

      Jon Stalnaker
      Editor, Hawk Talks
      Karel Staple Chapter SDC
      Jon Stalnaker
      Karel Staple Chapter SDC

      Comment


      • #4
        If you are lucky, you can beat me to one of the solid drivers in California for under 3K. I've found a half dozen like that this year.

        JDP/Maryland
        "I'm a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it."
        Thomas Jefferson
        JDP Maryland

        Comment


        • #5
          3500 right ball park there, then expect to check brakes, wheel cylinder, brake lines, and some sealing up of the engine. And tire condition. Over all, if you buy one for say 3000 expect to put in another 2000, cause you know there's something you'll want/need to fix.

          ChopStu
          61 Lark

          sigpic

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          • #6
            Thanks for the input guys! What I am hearing is about what I was expecting. Now for the "fun" part of scrounging the money together!! (and convincing my wife[xx(]...which will be harder I think!![B)])


            1963 Lark Custom, 259 V8, TT, 4 doors, 2 tone paint. Driven often, always noticed. Man I love this car!!

            Comment


            • #7
              $3500.00 1955 C-cab truck
              $600.00 to go get it
              $12.50 set of three bug bombs
              $75.00 new paint job (hey, spray paint is not cheap these days)
              $200.00 new white walls
              $200.00 powder coat wheels
              $500.00 refurbish/re-upholster seat
              $400.00 miscellaneous repairs
              $350.00 new wiring (no telling how much for the beer it took to get it done)
              Smile on our kids' faces when we take it for a ride.... PRICELESS!

              John and Tracy Smith
              Queen Creek Arizona
              http://1955studebaker.blogspot.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by John and Tracy Smith

                $3500.00 1955 C-cab truck
                $600.00 to go get it
                $12.50 set of three bug bombs
                $75.00 new paint job (hey, spray paint is not cheap these days)
                $200.00 new white walls
                $200.00 powder coat wheels
                $500.00 refurbish/re-upholster seat
                $400.00 miscellaneous repairs
                $350.00 new wiring (no telling how much for the beer it took to get it done)
                Smile on our kids' faces when we take it for a ride.... PRICELESS!

                John and Tracy Smith
                Queen Creek Arizona
                http://1955studebaker.blogspot.com/
                Speaking from experience, eh?


                1963 Lark Custom, 259 V8, TT, 4 doors, 2 tone paint. Driven often, always noticed. Man I love this car!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Start out your project by buying a rust free cab. Do the same for a bed. But even a lot of the rust free beds are beat down in the bottom. The rest of the stuff you can probably find locally because most of the fenders doors and hoods are equally beat whether they're rust free or not. The frame and suspension can be found easily compared to all of the other parts. The suspension will need all new bushings and brakes anyway, and you probably wouldn't be happy with the gearing in an original rearend. I would pick a 49 to 53 cab because it's all flat glass that can be cut by your local glass shop. The 54's had curved back glass, but it's not too hard to find, and it is tempered, so they lasted. But the 55 and up windshield is curved laminated. Expensive. Even a good used one will probably be old and separated and scratched up. And shipping a laminated windshield is a nail-biter. Buying an old car that looks half way decent for 3.5K will probably set you on a journey filled with regret, knowing you could have spent your money on top quality parts from the get go and ended up with something that isn't a congomeration of okiedokie repairs and flaws that you hope nobody sees...

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                  • #10
                    quote:Originally posted by buddymander

                    Start out your project by buying a rust free cab. Do the same for a bed. But even a lot of the rust free beds are beat down in the bottom. The rest of the stuff you can probably find locally because most of the fenders doors and hoods are equally beat whether they're rust free or not. The frame and suspension can be found easily compared to all of the other parts. The suspension will need all new bushings and brakes anyway, and you probably wouldn't be happy with the gearing in an original rearend. I would pick a 49 to 53 cab because it's all flat glass that can be cut by your local glass shop. The 54's had curved back glass, but it's not too hard to find, and it is tempered, so they lasted. But the 55 and up windshield is curved laminated. Expensive. Even a good used one will probably be old and separated and scratched up. And shipping a laminated windshield is a nail-biter. Buying an old car that looks half way decent for 3.5K will probably set you on a journey filled with regret, knowing you could have spent your money on top quality parts from the get go and ended up with something that isn't a congomeration of okiedokie repairs and flaws that you hope nobody sees...
                    Correction: the 54s were the first with the curved windshield, but still retained the small flat back window. The 55s were the first to have the larger rear window.

                    Skip Lackie
                    Washington DC
                    Skip Lackie

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                    • #11
                      Okiedokie repairs don't always lead to to flaws that you hope nobody sees. Sometimes they lead to pride in ownership. That being said, we think it totally depends on the amount of time you have to put into your truck. If you want it ready to go to work, you may need to spend more on your initial investment. If you're willing to get to know your truck a little better along the way, there are some great deals out there to start out with.

                      John and Tracy Smith
                      Queen Creek Arizona
                      http://1955studebaker.blogspot.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I don't mind working on the thing some...but I really don't have the time nor the space to put one together from parts that I pick up along the way. (although I do agree that is probably the best way to go)
                        I don't think my wife would appreciate me spending every weekend putting my truck together, and I don't think the town I live in would appreciate a partially assembled, 50+ year old truck sitting in my backyard for who knows how long...
                        I think I am going to go the route of saving up some money and buying one that is assembled and running, but not perfect. Then working out the bugs as I go.


                        1963 Lark Custom, 259 V8, TT, 4 doors, 2 tone paint. Driven often, always noticed. Man I love this car!!

                        Comment

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