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WW II Studebaker Truck?

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  • WW II Studebaker Truck?

    A few weeks ago I was out in Colorado on the Gold Wing. Stopped and took these pix by an abandoned gas station, somewhere around Red Rock Canyon, near the Colorado/Utah line. Am I correct in thinking this is a WW II era Studebaker truck? Thanks

  • #2
    Joe; No, not a Studebaker and not WWII vintage.
    Attached Files
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
      Joe; No, not a Studebaker and not WWII vintage.
      Darn. Was pretty sure I'd find out here though.
      Thanks Much

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      • #4
        I know where there is one in Michigan if somebody wants one.

        JT

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        • #5

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          • #6
            Dwain G.,

            Looking at the rather unique front fenders, I'd say the GMC link you provided is the same truck. Made 1941-45, so it is WW II era though. It was nice to look at, while taking a break on the road. I'd have opened the driver door and looked for a data plate, but did not wanna get shot, or arrested. LOL
            Thanks

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
              Dwain G.,

              Looking at the rather unique front fenders, I'd say the GMC link you provided is the same truck. Made 1941-45, so it is WW II era though. It was nice to look at, while taking a break on the road. I'd have opened the driver door and looked for a data plate, but did not wanna get shot, or arrested. LOL
              Thanks
              One doesn't have to open a door to read all the data plates on those old Army trucks. The Ordinance Department required all data plates to be exposed on the dash.

              I posted some photos of John Benter's restored US6 here:
              https://forum.studebakerdriversclub....1-2=&styleid=2

              Craig

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              • #8
                If the fenders are missing, I believe the US6 was the only truck of its size that used the opening vent window in the door.

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                • #9
                  I'd love to have one.

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                  • #10
                    Am no expert, but as noted above, the presence of vent windows is the big tip-off that it's a Stude US6. Another is the flat-top front fenders. Since that truck has only a single rear axle, I believe it is a Chevy and not a GMC. Would be glad to be corrected.
                    Skip Lackie

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                    • #11
                      To me the clue was the windshield. All the Studebaker trucks I have seen of the ww2 era had the laid back windshield courtesy of Loewry.
                      Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 62champ View Post
                        If the fenders are missing, I believe the US6 was the only truck of its size that used the opening vent window in the door.
                        The front fenders are not missing, and the fender in the pic I took with the license plate is identical to the GMC's front fender in the link Dwain G. provided. I know nothing about WW II era trucks, but always heard many were Studebakers. Having fun learning about them here.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by t walgamuth View Post
                          To me the clue was the windshield. All the Studebaker trucks I have seen of the ww2 era had the laid back windshield courtesy of Loewry.
                          There would only be one exception to that - a small number of US6 trucks were made with a soft top - guess those southern Russia summers are long and hot...



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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 62champ View Post

                            There would only be one exception to that - a small number of US6 trucks were made with a soft top - guess those southern Russia summers are long and hot...



                            With those, looks like the wind glass style would not pertain either.

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                            • #15
                              I own a 1945 Studebaker US6, WWII era deuce and a half (2 1/2 ton). The most prominent features compared to the other manufacturer's is that the two piece windshield opens out for ventilation along with typical vent windows in the doors, and the fenders were designed with a flat top so as to be used as a workbench during repairs and maintenance. The side panels located behind the headlamps was also remove-able for engine access. Another mostly unknown feature is that they drove both rear axles with separate driveshafts instead of the typical tandem axle setup linking both units together. Their reasoning was that they could drive over a land mine with the front axle (resulting in disabling it) and still have the rear to function until repairs could be facilitated. The picture posted in post # 2 is correct.
                              Bill

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