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  • The Good Old Days for Dealers?

    I just acquired a February-March 1936 NADA Official Used Car Guide; one of the value books still used by dealers today. I have no idea where it came from (i.e, what dealer used it 70 years ago!), but the dealer had these hand-written notes inside the front cover:

    Average Net Profit New Cars 1935: $14.94
    Average Net Loss Used Cars 1935: (8.59)
    Average Net Profit all cars 1935: $6.35, plus service.

    Here's some Studebaker-related values:

    1929 Dictator Cpe Bus: Avg Wholesale / Retail: $60 / $80.

    1933 President Rds Con State: [] $307 / $410.

    1932 Rockne 6-75 Sed Con DeL: $171 / $229

    1934 Pierce-Arrow 12 Rds Con: $1184 / $1579 [:0]

    1935 President 8 Rds Regl: $735 / $980 (only a year old; original MSRP: $1,325). [:I]

    Talk about tight margins during The Great Depression! [xx(] BP

    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    I have some of those old NADA books also. One interesting thing is that a 41 Studebaker is worth more in 1947 than it was in 1942. These prices seem really low, and they were, but below is a menu from the Studebaker Administration Building Dining Room in 1941. A full course meal including meat (even a roast leg of lamb!) two vegetables and a drink cost 35 cents. At the profit rate that you mentioned, you could eat for 18 days at the dining room on the sale of one car.



    Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

    Comment


    • #3
      I have some of those old NADA books also. One interesting thing is that a 41 Studebaker is worth more in 1947 than it was in 1942. These prices seem really low, and they were, but below is a menu from the Studebaker Administration Building Dining Room in 1941. A full course meal including meat (even a roast leg of lamb!) two vegetables and a drink cost 35 cents. At the profit rate that you mentioned, you could eat for 18 days at the dining room on the sale of one car.



      Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

      Comment


      • #4
        Just to clarify, I realize that car dealers wouldn't be eating at the Studebaker Administration Building, but I imagine that prices were about the same anywhere.

        Also notice the Two Tone Cocktail. I wonder what that was? Did it have anything to do with the Deluxe Tone 41 Studebakers?

        Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

        Comment


        • #5
          Just to clarify, I realize that car dealers wouldn't be eating at the Studebaker Administration Building, but I imagine that prices were about the same anywhere.

          Also notice the Two Tone Cocktail. I wonder what that was? Did it have anything to do with the Deluxe Tone 41 Studebakers?

          Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

          Comment


          • #6
            Yeah, that Two-Tone cocktail cought my eye, first thing! And "Carrots Vichy" - this was before Hitler had influence in France![}]

            Miscreant adrift in
            the BerStuda Triangle!!

            1957 Transtar 1/2ton
            1960 Larkvertible V8
            1958 Provincial wagon
            1953 Commander coupe

            No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

            Comment


            • #7
              Yeah, that Two-Tone cocktail cought my eye, first thing! And "Carrots Vichy" - this was before Hitler had influence in France![}]

              Miscreant adrift in
              the BerStuda Triangle!!

              1957 Transtar 1/2ton
              1960 Larkvertible V8
              1958 Provincial wagon
              1953 Commander coupe

              No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi

                Slim margins, but any sale was needed in those tough economic times. The retail values of cars we know today as highly desirable and value seem astonishing, weren't in the context of that time.

                I have old issues of those NADA books from 1948 through 1965, every three years, that give a good idea of how individual makes fared in the market.
                It was normal for pre-war cars to have a retail value higher than their original factory delivered prices in those post-war years up to mid-1949. That was the seller's market, the result of huge pent-up demand from no new cars being available because of war production restrictions (completely necessary to win WWII).

                A few examples:
                NADA Official Used Car Guide, Region A Edition, Jan 1,1948 to Feb 29,1948 Factory Price, As Is, Average Retail
                1941 President Skyway Land Cruiser; $1260 $1035 $1295
                1942 Commander DeL Cruising Sedan; $1173 $1020 $1275

                I will be glad to look up the value of anyone's car as used, just ask here on the Forum.
                Steve

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi

                  Slim margins, but any sale was needed in those tough economic times. The retail values of cars we know today as highly desirable and value seem astonishing, weren't in the context of that time.

                  I have old issues of those NADA books from 1948 through 1965, every three years, that give a good idea of how individual makes fared in the market.
                  It was normal for pre-war cars to have a retail value higher than their original factory delivered prices in those post-war years up to mid-1949. That was the seller's market, the result of huge pent-up demand from no new cars being available because of war production restrictions (completely necessary to win WWII).

                  A few examples:
                  NADA Official Used Car Guide, Region A Edition, Jan 1,1948 to Feb 29,1948 Factory Price, As Is, Average Retail
                  1941 President Skyway Land Cruiser; $1260 $1035 $1295
                  1942 Commander DeL Cruising Sedan; $1173 $1020 $1275

                  I will be glad to look up the value of anyone's car as used, just ask here on the Forum.
                  Steve

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Just to comment on what lstude said concerning the value of a '41 Stude was more in '47 than '42, we must remember that, after WWII, we were going through a strong inflationary period. The Feds slapped price controls on a lot of stuff, including cars in order to stop run away inflation. Price controls very rarely work though.
                    Also, don't forget that it was a seller's market for cars. After the war, there was a pent-up demand for cars to replace worn out cars that were used during the war.
                    Rog

                    '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
                    '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
                    Smithtown,NY
                    Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just to comment on what lstude said concerning the value of a '41 Stude was more in '47 than '42, we must remember that, after WWII, we were going through a strong inflationary period. The Feds slapped price controls on a lot of stuff, including cars in order to stop run away inflation. Price controls very rarely work though.
                      Also, don't forget that it was a seller's market for cars. After the war, there was a pent-up demand for cars to replace worn out cars that were used during the war.
                      Rog

                      '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
                      '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
                      Smithtown,NY
                      Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The father of a close friend of mine was in the timber and sawmill business and in need of a truck for hauling as the war was winding down. A relative offered him a prewar International flatbed for the outlandish price of $1500. Glen promptly bought it knowing that it could be years before a new one was available. His relative was elated to get the money but soon found out he had been outsnookered when he couldn't replace the truck.


                        Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

                        Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

                        Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
                        Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                        The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                        �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                        For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                        "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The father of a close friend of mine was in the timber and sawmill business and in need of a truck for hauling as the war was winding down. A relative offered him a prewar International flatbed for the outlandish price of $1500. Glen promptly bought it knowing that it could be years before a new one was available. His relative was elated to get the money but soon found out he had been outsnookered when he couldn't replace the truck.


                          Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

                          Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

                          Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
                          Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                          The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                          �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                          For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                          "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

                          Comment

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