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  • #61
    Oh-oh!

    Have to think a bit here.
    '37 Dictator sedan, partially built street rod.
    '40 Champion business coupe.
    '44 (?) Weasel
    '44 US6
    3 '47 M16s
    '52 2R5 (parts only)
    '52-3 2R15
    '53 2R17A
    '53 Champion 4 door, early tristar car
    '53 Champion coupe, parts only
    Several Hawk parts cars, plus a "builder" '58 Silver Hawk
    2 '63 Wagonaires
    '64 GT hawk
    '62 Champ
    '64 Wagonaire
    '64 Daytona Hardtop

    I make it 19, counting some that will never run, but most of them do, although not all are roadworthy.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    • #62
      [quote]Originally posted by Guido

      Don't get me (or JDP among others) started on a list of ones we have owned and disposed of.

      Ooooh, I was hoping we wouldn't get into what we all paid for our Studes along with what we own. It's a well known fact that, with a few exceptions, Studebakers were essentially used cars in the seventies, and priced accordingly. And those who have owned them since that time 'stole' them going by today's market value for them compared to what they're now worth even in #3 condition. For example, I only paid $350 for my '64 convert in 1980. And many of the cars I parted out, I paid anywhere from $25 to $100 each and got my money back in the parts. Many of us posted our 'Stude Regrets' a few months ago of ones that we parted out or let 'get away'. Looking back, I do wish I kept that '61 Cruiser that I had in 1979, but they weren't worth restoring back then. It's the old 'hindsight is 20-20' addage we all experienced, though it appears many of us did have the foresight to hang on to our Studebakers over the long term.

      Craig.

      Comment


      • #63
        [quote]Originally posted by Guido

        Don't get me (or JDP among others) started on a list of ones we have owned and disposed of.

        Ooooh, I was hoping we wouldn't get into what we all paid for our Studes along with what we own. It's a well known fact that, with a few exceptions, Studebakers were essentially used cars in the seventies, and priced accordingly. And those who have owned them since that time 'stole' them going by today's market value for them compared to what they're now worth even in #3 condition. For example, I only paid $350 for my '64 convert in 1980. And many of the cars I parted out, I paid anywhere from $25 to $100 each and got my money back in the parts. Many of us posted our 'Stude Regrets' a few months ago of ones that we parted out or let 'get away'. Looking back, I do wish I kept that '61 Cruiser that I had in 1979, but they weren't worth restoring back then. It's the old 'hindsight is 20-20' addage we all experienced, though it appears many of us did have the foresight to hang on to our Studebakers over the long term.

        Craig.

        Comment


        • #64
          [quote]quote:Originally posted by 8E45E

          Originally posted by Guido

          Don't get me (or JDP among others) started on a list of ones we have owned and disposed of.

          Ooooh, I was hoping we wouldn't get into what we all paid for our Studes along with what we own. It's a well known fact that, with a few exceptions, Studebakers were essentially used cars in the seventies, and priced accordingly. And those who have owned them since that time 'stole' them going by today's market value for them compared to what they're now worth even in #3 condition. For example, I only paid $350 for my '64 convert in 1980. And many of the cars I parted out, I paid anywhere from $25 to $100 each and got my money back in the parts. Many of us posted our 'Stude Regrets' a few months ago of ones that we parted out or let 'get away'. Looking back, I do wish I kept that '61 Cruiser that I had in 1979, but they weren't worth restoring back then. It's the old 'hindsight is 20-20' addage we all experienced, though it appears many of us did have the foresight to hang on to our Studebakers over the long term.

          Craig.
          I got two Studebakers for nothing in the 90s. The first was a '48 Champion 2-door sedan which hadn't been driven in 9 or 10 years, but was easily started and even the overdrive worked. The other was a '64 Challenger 4-door 6 with three-speed, solid with mimimal rust. The guy who gave it to me had spent a lot of money on it- new clutch, brakes, many small parts, but unfortunately it had two broken pistons and a bad starter and I didn't feel like tackling the engine. So I ended up donating it to Keystone for their auction when I couldn't sell it at York for $100 as a project car.

          [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/64%20Daytona%20Convertible/Copy%20of%20DaytonaConvert7-20-06.JPG[/img=right]

          Paul Johnson
          '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
          '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
          '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
          Museum R-4 engine
          Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
          '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

          Comment


          • #65
            [quote]quote:Originally posted by 8E45E

            Originally posted by Guido

            Don't get me (or JDP among others) started on a list of ones we have owned and disposed of.

            Ooooh, I was hoping we wouldn't get into what we all paid for our Studes along with what we own. It's a well known fact that, with a few exceptions, Studebakers were essentially used cars in the seventies, and priced accordingly. And those who have owned them since that time 'stole' them going by today's market value for them compared to what they're now worth even in #3 condition. For example, I only paid $350 for my '64 convert in 1980. And many of the cars I parted out, I paid anywhere from $25 to $100 each and got my money back in the parts. Many of us posted our 'Stude Regrets' a few months ago of ones that we parted out or let 'get away'. Looking back, I do wish I kept that '61 Cruiser that I had in 1979, but they weren't worth restoring back then. It's the old 'hindsight is 20-20' addage we all experienced, though it appears many of us did have the foresight to hang on to our Studebakers over the long term.

            Craig.
            I got two Studebakers for nothing in the 90s. The first was a '48 Champion 2-door sedan which hadn't been driven in 9 or 10 years, but was easily started and even the overdrive worked. The other was a '64 Challenger 4-door 6 with three-speed, solid with mimimal rust. The guy who gave it to me had spent a lot of money on it- new clutch, brakes, many small parts, but unfortunately it had two broken pistons and a bad starter and I didn't feel like tackling the engine. So I ended up donating it to Keystone for their auction when I couldn't sell it at York for $100 as a project car.

            [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/64%20Daytona%20Convertible/Copy%20of%20DaytonaConvert7-20-06.JPG[/img=right]

            Paul Johnson
            '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
            '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
            '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
            Museum R-4 engine
            Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
            '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

            Comment

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