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  • bondobilly
    replied
    I installed a JVC Camellion (spelling). It mounts to the underside of the dash, and far back (56J). When you look inside the car it looks like part of the heating system. When you either press the remote or touch the box it lights up, and the controls move out on a motorized tray/drawer.

    For the speakers. there are two ways of doing it in a C/K on the kick pads there is an indent that was made to accept the rollup antenna control. You can mount a high end speaker in that indent, and place a grille over them.

    I have only found one issue with any stereo radio in a Studebaker, at highway speed, windows down and cars passing you, especially 18 wheelers you cannot really listen comfortably.

    I was going to have the radio converted, but in speaking with a fellow in the SDC who is deep into audio he cautioned against it. Not that the conversions are bad, shoddy, or anything negative, but he felt that the radios from the 40's and 50's are classics and the guts should remain as they were because of nostalgia.

    BG

    Leave a comment:


  • bondobilly
    replied
    I installed a JVC Camellion (spelling). It mounts to the underside of the dash, and far back (56J). When you look inside the car it looks like part of the heating system. When you either press the remote or touch the box it lights up, and the controls move out on a motorized tray/drawer.

    For the speakers. there are two ways of doing it in a C/K on the kick pads there is an indent that was made to accept the rollup antenna control. You can mount a high end speaker in that indent, and place a grille over them.

    I have only found one issue with any stereo radio in a Studebaker, at highway speed, windows down and cars passing you, especially 18 wheelers you cannot really listen comfortably.

    I was going to have the radio converted, but in speaking with a fellow in the SDC who is deep into audio he cautioned against it. Not that the conversions are bad, shoddy, or anything negative, but he felt that the radios from the 40's and 50's are classics and the guts should remain as they were because of nostalgia.

    BG

    Leave a comment:


  • starlightchamp
    replied
    i have been repairing old car radios since 1950. Latest repair was a 1947 Chevy and two Studebaker 1950-51 radios. First to answer your question on six volt positive ground
    radio in a converted twelve volt negative ground car. You need a 12 volt, negative ground vibrator. A source for these has been mentionrd above. The vacumn tubes will have 6 volt heaters so must be replaced with 12 volt filaments of the same tube type. If the tube count is even number (six or eight) you could rewire so that two tube heaters are in series for each pair in the radio. Frankly, since the tubes are 50+ years old, you might as well buy a new set with the 12 volt rating. As already mentioned, the buffer capacitor is a must, a 1600 volt cap that goes across the transformer secondary. Remember that tube radios operate at high voltages on their anodes (plates) like + 250 volts so be careful! The filter capacitors are usually in a metal can near the rectifier tube and usually dried out internally and shorted.
    Since the vibrator will cost near $40, you don't want to turn on the set with shorted filter capacitors. They can be replaced being sure to use 450 volt ratings. The coupling capacitors that carry the signal from the plates to grid of output power tubes must stand off this 250 volts and any leakage will appear on the control grid, causing the tube to over conduct and suck down the power supply. These caps also must be replaced. You definitley need a schematic of the radio to repair and align it. Also a volt-ohm meter as minimum test equipment. If you decide to tackle it let me know and I can walk you through some of the troubles. I assume you know how to solder.
    Good luck
    ..Dick

    Leave a comment:


  • starlightchamp
    replied
    i have been repairing old car radios since 1950. Latest repair was a 1947 Chevy and two Studebaker 1950-51 radios. First to answer your question on six volt positive ground
    radio in a converted twelve volt negative ground car. You need a 12 volt, negative ground vibrator. A source for these has been mentionrd above. The vacumn tubes will have 6 volt heaters so must be replaced with 12 volt filaments of the same tube type. If the tube count is even number (six or eight) you could rewire so that two tube heaters are in series for each pair in the radio. Frankly, since the tubes are 50+ years old, you might as well buy a new set with the 12 volt rating. As already mentioned, the buffer capacitor is a must, a 1600 volt cap that goes across the transformer secondary. Remember that tube radios operate at high voltages on their anodes (plates) like + 250 volts so be careful! The filter capacitors are usually in a metal can near the rectifier tube and usually dried out internally and shorted.
    Since the vibrator will cost near $40, you don't want to turn on the set with shorted filter capacitors. They can be replaced being sure to use 450 volt ratings. The coupling capacitors that carry the signal from the plates to grid of output power tubes must stand off this 250 volts and any leakage will appear on the control grid, causing the tube to over conduct and suck down the power supply. These caps also must be replaced. You definitley need a schematic of the radio to repair and align it. Also a volt-ohm meter as minimum test equipment. If you decide to tackle it let me know and I can walk you through some of the troubles. I assume you know how to solder.
    Good luck
    ..Dick

    Leave a comment:


  • 1950Champ
    replied
    Will replacing the vibrator with a 12v negative ground make the radio ready to hook up to the car which has been converted to 12v, or do lots of other things need to be done?

    Leave a comment:


  • 1950Champ
    replied
    Will replacing the vibrator with a 12v negative ground make the radio ready to hook up to the car which has been converted to 12v, or do lots of other things need to be done?

    Leave a comment:


  • gordr
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by 1950Champ

    I would prefer to fix the radio myself here during the summer, where can I order replacement electrolytic capacitors that Clark mentioned? Also, there is no noise at all from the radio when running, humming etc. A guy said the vibrator should also be replaced as it should be making noise, is this true, and where would I get a replacement? The radio is a Philco s4927, for a 1950.
    Thanks,
    Spence
    Spence, another source for capacitors and solid-state vibrator replacements is Antique Electronics Supply, http://www.tubesandmore.com/

    You MUST replace the buffer capacitor connected across the secondary of the vibrator transformer. It will be a paper capacitor rated at 1600 volts, the only one in the radio rated at that voltage. You SHOULD replace the electrolytic capacitors, and all the paper capacitors, too. They typically cost between 50 cents and a buck apiece, and there aren't so many that the cost of replacing them will break you.

    There are numerous Websites that go into considerable detail on the process of tube radio restoration; let me know if you want a few more links. Just Googling for "antique radio" will turn up a bunch, though.

    BTW, it's normal for vibrators to make a low hum. Again, replace the buffer capacitor. The old one is probably shorted, or about to short, and it will kill your vibrator instantly, and it will kill a solid-state one even faster.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Leave a comment:


  • gordr
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by 1950Champ

    I would prefer to fix the radio myself here during the summer, where can I order replacement electrolytic capacitors that Clark mentioned? Also, there is no noise at all from the radio when running, humming etc. A guy said the vibrator should also be replaced as it should be making noise, is this true, and where would I get a replacement? The radio is a Philco s4927, for a 1950.
    Thanks,
    Spence
    Spence, another source for capacitors and solid-state vibrator replacements is Antique Electronics Supply, http://www.tubesandmore.com/

    You MUST replace the buffer capacitor connected across the secondary of the vibrator transformer. It will be a paper capacitor rated at 1600 volts, the only one in the radio rated at that voltage. You SHOULD replace the electrolytic capacitors, and all the paper capacitors, too. They typically cost between 50 cents and a buck apiece, and there aren't so many that the cost of replacing them will break you.

    There are numerous Websites that go into considerable detail on the process of tube radio restoration; let me know if you want a few more links. Just Googling for "antique radio" will turn up a bunch, though.

    BTW, it's normal for vibrators to make a low hum. Again, replace the buffer capacitor. The old one is probably shorted, or about to short, and it will kill your vibrator instantly, and it will kill a solid-state one even faster.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Leave a comment:


  • JDP
    replied
    Buy this modern, solid state version.


    http://www.radiodaze.com/auto-radios.htm

    JDP/Maryland


    63 GT R2
    63 Avanti R1
    63 Daytona convert-63
    63 Lark 2 door
    62 Lark 2 door
    60 Lark HT-60Hawk
    59 3E truck
    58 Starlight
    52 & 53 Starliner
    51 Commander

    Leave a comment:


  • JDP
    replied
    Buy this modern, solid state version.


    http://www.radiodaze.com/auto-radios.htm

    JDP/Maryland


    63 GT R2
    63 Avanti R1
    63 Daytona convert-63
    63 Lark 2 door
    62 Lark 2 door
    60 Lark HT-60Hawk
    59 3E truck
    58 Starlight
    52 & 53 Starliner
    51 Commander

    Leave a comment:


  • 1950Champ
    replied
    I would prefer to fix the radio myself here during the summer, where can I order replacement electrolytic capacitors that Clark mentioned? Also, there is no noise at all from the radio when running, humming etc. A guy said the vibrator should also be replaced as it should be making noise, is this true, and where would I get a replacement? The radio is a Philco s4927, for a 1950.
    Thanks,
    Spence

    Leave a comment:


  • 1950Champ
    replied
    I would prefer to fix the radio myself here during the summer, where can I order replacement electrolytic capacitors that Clark mentioned? Also, there is no noise at all from the radio when running, humming etc. A guy said the vibrator should also be replaced as it should be making noise, is this true, and where would I get a replacement? The radio is a Philco s4927, for a 1950.
    Thanks,
    Spence

    Leave a comment:


  • johnesmonde
    replied
    I eventually built a 3 sided enclosure (open to the back)for the 62 Hawk to fit on top of the transmission hump between the hump and the lip of the dash. Approx. 12" wide, 9" high and 8" deep. I mounted two 4 inch coaxial Infinity speakers from Future Shop in the bottom section of the enclosure front panel with a Clarion Radio/CD head unit in the top right. The enclosure sits under the dash lip yet behind the portion that dips down by the lighter. The head unit actually sits tight to the dash beside the lighter section. I covered the enclosure with black vinyl and it matches and melts right into the dash.People not completely familiar with the Hawk think it is factory. I use the single mono speaker in the rear shelf hooked to left side only and it sounds great. Custom Audio Sound does have a Dual Voice Coil speaker for the rear which allows both left and right channels to be hooked up to one speaker but I don't think I'll bother. I can send pictures if anyone is interested.

    Regards,
    John

    John Esmonde
    Holland Landing, Ontario
    Canada
    '62 Hawk
    '30 Chev Coach

    Leave a comment:


  • johnesmonde
    replied
    I eventually built a 3 sided enclosure (open to the back)for the 62 Hawk to fit on top of the transmission hump between the hump and the lip of the dash. Approx. 12" wide, 9" high and 8" deep. I mounted two 4 inch coaxial Infinity speakers from Future Shop in the bottom section of the enclosure front panel with a Clarion Radio/CD head unit in the top right. The enclosure sits under the dash lip yet behind the portion that dips down by the lighter. The head unit actually sits tight to the dash beside the lighter section. I covered the enclosure with black vinyl and it matches and melts right into the dash.People not completely familiar with the Hawk think it is factory. I use the single mono speaker in the rear shelf hooked to left side only and it sounds great. Custom Audio Sound does have a Dual Voice Coil speaker for the rear which allows both left and right channels to be hooked up to one speaker but I don't think I'll bother. I can send pictures if anyone is interested.

    Regards,
    John

    John Esmonde
    Holland Landing, Ontario
    Canada
    '62 Hawk
    '30 Chev Coach

    Leave a comment:


  • fpstude
    replied
    Thanks to this forum, and information from Greywbl, I've located the 4" x 8" speaker needed for out Lark. I've been looking for years. You find one at a swap meeet, but it has been in the bottom of a box for years. I'll be ordering one in a few days.

    Perry
    '23 Special Six,
    '50 Business Champ,
    '50 Starlight Champ,
    '60 Lark droptop,
    '63 GT

    Leave a comment:

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