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  • #46
    i have been repairing old car radios since 1950. Latest repair was a 1947 Chevy and two Studebaker 1950-51 radios. First to answer your question on six volt positive ground
    radio in a converted twelve volt negative ground car. You need a 12 volt, negative ground vibrator. A source for these has been mentionrd above. The vacumn tubes will have 6 volt heaters so must be replaced with 12 volt filaments of the same tube type. If the tube count is even number (six or eight) you could rewire so that two tube heaters are in series for each pair in the radio. Frankly, since the tubes are 50+ years old, you might as well buy a new set with the 12 volt rating. As already mentioned, the buffer capacitor is a must, a 1600 volt cap that goes across the transformer secondary. Remember that tube radios operate at high voltages on their anodes (plates) like + 250 volts so be careful! The filter capacitors are usually in a metal can near the rectifier tube and usually dried out internally and shorted.
    Since the vibrator will cost near $40, you don't want to turn on the set with shorted filter capacitors. They can be replaced being sure to use 450 volt ratings. The coupling capacitors that carry the signal from the plates to grid of output power tubes must stand off this 250 volts and any leakage will appear on the control grid, causing the tube to over conduct and suck down the power supply. These caps also must be replaced. You definitley need a schematic of the radio to repair and align it. Also a volt-ohm meter as minimum test equipment. If you decide to tackle it let me know and I can walk you through some of the troubles. I assume you know how to solder.
    Good luck
    ..Dick
    The 1950 Champion Starlight
    Santa Barbara
    CA

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    • #47
      i have been repairing old car radios since 1950. Latest repair was a 1947 Chevy and two Studebaker 1950-51 radios. First to answer your question on six volt positive ground
      radio in a converted twelve volt negative ground car. You need a 12 volt, negative ground vibrator. A source for these has been mentionrd above. The vacumn tubes will have 6 volt heaters so must be replaced with 12 volt filaments of the same tube type. If the tube count is even number (six or eight) you could rewire so that two tube heaters are in series for each pair in the radio. Frankly, since the tubes are 50+ years old, you might as well buy a new set with the 12 volt rating. As already mentioned, the buffer capacitor is a must, a 1600 volt cap that goes across the transformer secondary. Remember that tube radios operate at high voltages on their anodes (plates) like + 250 volts so be careful! The filter capacitors are usually in a metal can near the rectifier tube and usually dried out internally and shorted.
      Since the vibrator will cost near $40, you don't want to turn on the set with shorted filter capacitors. They can be replaced being sure to use 450 volt ratings. The coupling capacitors that carry the signal from the plates to grid of output power tubes must stand off this 250 volts and any leakage will appear on the control grid, causing the tube to over conduct and suck down the power supply. These caps also must be replaced. You definitley need a schematic of the radio to repair and align it. Also a volt-ohm meter as minimum test equipment. If you decide to tackle it let me know and I can walk you through some of the troubles. I assume you know how to solder.
      Good luck
      ..Dick
      The 1950 Champion Starlight
      Santa Barbara
      CA

      Comment


      • #48
        I installed a JVC Camellion (spelling). It mounts to the underside of the dash, and far back (56J). When you look inside the car it looks like part of the heating system. When you either press the remote or touch the box it lights up, and the controls move out on a motorized tray/drawer.

        For the speakers. there are two ways of doing it in a C/K on the kick pads there is an indent that was made to accept the rollup antenna control. You can mount a high end speaker in that indent, and place a grille over them.

        I have only found one issue with any stereo radio in a Studebaker, at highway speed, windows down and cars passing you, especially 18 wheelers you cannot really listen comfortably.

        I was going to have the radio converted, but in speaking with a fellow in the SDC who is deep into audio he cautioned against it. Not that the conversions are bad, shoddy, or anything negative, but he felt that the radios from the 40's and 50's are classics and the guts should remain as they were because of nostalgia.

        BG

        Comment


        • #49
          I installed a JVC Camellion (spelling). It mounts to the underside of the dash, and far back (56J). When you look inside the car it looks like part of the heating system. When you either press the remote or touch the box it lights up, and the controls move out on a motorized tray/drawer.

          For the speakers. there are two ways of doing it in a C/K on the kick pads there is an indent that was made to accept the rollup antenna control. You can mount a high end speaker in that indent, and place a grille over them.

          I have only found one issue with any stereo radio in a Studebaker, at highway speed, windows down and cars passing you, especially 18 wheelers you cannot really listen comfortably.

          I was going to have the radio converted, but in speaking with a fellow in the SDC who is deep into audio he cautioned against it. Not that the conversions are bad, shoddy, or anything negative, but he felt that the radios from the 40's and 50's are classics and the guts should remain as they were because of nostalgia.

          BG

          Comment

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