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  • What are you, Studebaker Driver or FT Mechanic?

    I don't know about you guys but it sure seems to me that I am spending more time under my car these days than driving it.

    I just headed out to see a friends electrical problem at his house and on the return home my Hawk did a HARD pull to the left when I put on the brakes.

    I just finished changing the transmission fluid and now have a puddle on my shop floor. Looks like it is coming from the drive shaft yolk and not from the rear seal.

    How is that possible?

    This is just not in my cards this week with a start of University classes and the PSMCDR starting on Friday.

    No use typing here anymore. I got to go and pull that passenger front wheel off and find out what going on with that front disk brake. Hopefully it is just the front flex hose collapsed internally and it will be a quick fix.





    1964 GT Hawk R2 Clone
    Oakville, Ontario.

    Hamilton Chapter
    See you at the PSMCDR in Stanton Michigan September 12& 13
    1964 GT Hawk
    PSMCDR 2014
    Best time: 14.473 sec. 96.57 MPH quarter mile
    PSMCDR 2013
    Best time: 14.654 sec. 94.53 MPH quarter

    Victoria, Canada

  • #2
    I feel your pain. I am not a mechanic but I am playing one now and I don't like it!

    Leonard Shepherd
    http://leonardshepherd.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      Think how I feel. I just love to have long finger nails they don't look so good all Studebaker grease stained. But ya gotta work on them to drive them. Or as my Dad used to say if you are gonna drive it you need to learn how to work on it. So thats how I was brought up.

      Mabel 1949 Champion
      1957 Silverhawk
      1955 Champion 4Dr.Regal
      Gus 1958 Transtar
      1955 President State
      Fresno,Ca
      Mabel 1949 Champion
      Hawk 1957 Silverhawk
      Gus 1958 Transtar
      The Prez 1955 President State
      Blu 1957 Golden Hawk
      Daisy 1954 Regal Commander Starlight Coupe
      Fresno,Ca

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by studebaker-R2-4-me

        I don't know about you guys but it sure seems to me that I am spending more time under my car these days than driving it.

        I just headed out to see a friends electrical problem at his house and on the return home my Hawk did a HARD pull to the left when I put on the brakes.

        I just finished changing the transmission fluid and now have a puddle on my shop floor. Looks like it is coming from the drive shaft yolk and not from the rear seal.

        How is that possible?

        This is just not in my cards this week with a start of University classes and the PSMCDR starting on Friday.

        No use typing here anymore. I got to go and pull that passenger front wheel off and find out what going on with that front disk brake. Hopefully it is just the front flex hose collapsed internally and it will be a quick fix.

        1964 GT Hawk R2 Clone
        Oakville, Ontario.

        Hamilton Chapter
        See you at the PSMCDR in Stanton Michigan September 12& 13
        I know what you mean. My everyday 'temporary' driver is a Stude, so there is normal maintenance work plus improvements. In the last couple of months, it's gotten new rear springs/bushings, new rear swaybar bushings, new rear shocks, new exhaust, new wheels/tires, new front shocks, new fuel return line to the tank, valves adjusted, new valve cover gaskets, heater core pulled out and cowl cleaned (big mouse nest from who knows how long ago), blower motor disassembled cleaned/lubed, new heater hoses.........whew!![xx(]

        And that's only the big stuff. Now I've got to get the engine together in my 'real' everyday driver ('54 Champion) because the cost of the gas for the '63 Daytona (R1) is killing me.

        But, this is the fun part for me - working on them and driving them.

        Paul
        Winston-Salem, NC
        Visit The NEW Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com
        Paul
        Winston-Salem, NC
        Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

        Comment


        • #5
          I will admit that I do no work on mine at all, other than keeping it clean, trying to keep it dry, and trying to keep things lubed/rustproofed as well as I can. I even take it in for an oil change! No room/time/tools/experience to work on it. I love the car, learning about its history, and Studebaker folks, but at age 50 I admit I'm becoming increasingly frustrated when something needs attention on it (which seems like more and more often!). Although they are supposedly easier to work on than modern iron, I find it harder and harder to find local places that want to even touch it. I travel with work a good bit and when I'm home, would really rather spend time with family than spending more and more bucks to find some place that will fix it! Don't get me wrong, I have loved the car for the twenty years I've owned it, but this year, with making less commission than past years so far, the Daytona's need for work is more vexing than ever!

          OK, I'm off my soapbox for now! I may feel differently tomorrow.

          Bill Pressler
          Kent, OH
          '63 Lark Daytona Skytop R1



          Bill Pressler
          Kent, OH
          (formerly Greenville, PA)
          Currently owned: 1966 Cruiser, Timberline Turquoise, 26K miles
          Formerly owned: 1963 Lark Daytona Skytop R1, Ermine White
          1964 Daytona Hardtop, Strato Blue
          1966 Daytona Sports Sedan, Niagara Blue Mist
          All are in Australia now

          Comment


          • #6
            I like to tinker around with stuff.

            What's the definition of 'tinker'?
            Hmmmm....

            Definitions of tinker on the Web:

            Putter: do random, unplanned work or activities or spend time idly; "The old lady is usually mucking about in her little house"

            A person who enjoys fixing and experimenting with machines and their parts.

            Formerly a person (traditionally a Gypsy) who traveled from place to place mending pots and kettles and other metal utensils as a way to earn a living work as a tinker or tinkerer.

            Try to fix or mend; "Can you tinker with the T.V. set--it's not working right";

            "She always fiddles with her van on the weekend"
            Chub mackerel: small mackerel found nearly worldwide

            So I guess working on a Stude with a chub makerel is pretty close, huh?
            Jeff[8D]


            http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock
            HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

            Jeff


            Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



            Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

            Comment


            • #7
              Welcome to the club Alan,my 63 GT is a real money pit & it seems always something breaks or needs repair.I'me getting too old to get "under" but don't mind tinkering up-top,This week it was a new fuel pump & rebuilt carburator.Still to do is the front input shaft seal in the transmission as it's getting worse.I keep putting it off a I dont like getting under anymore----Flippin rotten frizzel-frazeling Car

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK

                [navy][b]I like to tinker around with stuff.

                What's the definition of 'tinker'?
                Hmmmm....

                [black]Definitions of tinker on the Web:

                Putter: do random, unplanned work or activities or spend time idly; "The old lady is usually mucking about in her little house"

                A person who enjoys fixing and experimenting with machines and their parts.

                Formerly a person (traditionally a Gypsy) who traveled from place to place mending pots and kettles and other metal utensils as a way to earn a living work as a tinker or tinkerer.

                Try to fix or mend; "Can you tinker with the T.V. set--it's not working right";

                "She always fiddles with her van on the weekend"
                As neither of of my Studebakers were in running condition, I tinker when I can.

                ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Tom - Mulberry, FL

                1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

                Tom - Bradenton, FL

                1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

                Comment


                • #9
                  I guess I am lucky (knock on wood quickly!!), my Stude is driveable so while I do spend some time "tinkering" or "maintaining", I am also spending time driving. [^]

                  It is the [u]other</u> things in life that usually prevent me from attending Stude functions - like the Whatcom Mini-Meet tomorrow.

                  <h5>Mark
                  '57 Transtar Deluxe
                  Vancouver Island

                  Are you planning to attend the NW Overdrive Tour in Parksville, BC
                  May 23 & 24, 2009?
                  </h5>
                  Mark Hayden
                  '66 Commander
                  Zone Coordinator
                  Pacific Can-Am Zone

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    quote:Originally posted by Studedude
                    I put in 53 hours this week, and Monday was a holiday! I'm obviously not ready to retire, but could do with less pressure/stress at this point in my life. I would like to work fewer hours, fer sure.

                    DAVE, THE EVIL TWIN FROM OKLAHOMA
                    Hang in there Dave! I've got 3 1/2 years to go for a full pension at which time I intend to really start enjoying a few things. [8D] Maybe then I can think about another Stude too...

                    <h5>Mark
                    '57 Transtar Deluxe
                    Vancouver Island

                    Are you planning to attend the NW Overdrive Tour in Parksville, BC
                    May 23 & 24, 2009?
                    </h5>
                    Mark Hayden
                    '66 Commander
                    Zone Coordinator
                    Pacific Can-Am Zone

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The Hawk with the pulling brakes might just have a brake caliper that has reached the limit of travel due to pad wear. This usually occurs at about the same time on both sides at the same time but can occur faster on one side than the other. When you check you will think you have pleanty of pad left but the problem is the piston comes against a stop way before the pad looks warn out.

                      David L
                      David L

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I can sympathize, I definitely am a "mechanic" and will remain so until I can come up with the scratch for a "drive home" STudebaker (or other interesting vintage car.)

                        Unfortunately the odds of that happening so long as I'm living near DC are about none. (even more so now that I'm thinking that I might have to redo the deck at my place and get some windows done sooner than hoped) So I'll keep my wrenches cleaned and ready...

                        nate

                        --
                        55 Commander Starlight
                        http://members.cox.net/njnagel
                        --
                        55 Commander Starlight
                        http://members.cox.net/njnagel

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          This is definitely the downside of old cars. As much as we love them, they will always take much more effort (and maybe money) to keep them going than modern stuff. My techs try to avoid working on classic cars for the following reasons:

                          *Lesser knowledge/more figuring out, due to being so different from what they see daily

                          *Very few specialty tools, for the same reason

                          *Tons of last time at the desk trying to find parts/info

                          *Frequently over-anal owners: Too nervous about them getting dirty, as if they take less precautions to protect their car than others'

                          *Self-centeredness- thinking because their car is a classic, it gets priority over everyone else's

                          *Disgruntled customers who cannot understand why their classic breaks down so much more than their modern car

                          We see people all the time who buy a classic car they've always wanted, only to be disappointed when they find out they take a LOT of work to be daily drivers. Even when the money's there to pay for the work, working shops are reluctant to get involved with the cars for the above reasons. Fun story: My guy did a tune-up and carb rebuild on a 70 Malibu with the 307 a few years back. Not a mint car, but an original driver. The car ran great when the customer left, but called back the next day- angry. The car had quit and wouldn't start, so naturally the guy called and said "What'd you do to my car??" Car was towed in- jumped timing. Customer said, "Well, I need this to be reliable- you should have serviced that!!" After a lengthy explanation, he agreed to the timing chain job, including pulling the pan and cleaning the teeth out of the pickup. Car runs good, customer writes another check. Couple months later, car quits again. Diagnosis? Totally plugged fuel filter- full of rust. Customer again annoyed, tech replaces filter at no charge, and refuses to work on the car any more.

                          All too often, people buy old cars to perform like a 2005, and blame the car, the seller or a mechanic when it doesn't. My solution is to never drive one of my oldies when I need to rush off somewhere, or go a long distance. To me they're my hobby- really a way of life- but not a lifeline.

                          Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                          Parish, central NY 13131

                          "Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

                          "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"



                          Comment


                          • #14
                            All excellent points, Bob. I am the opposite of this...I tell shops they can fit my car in whenever, have it as long as it takes, have the shop manual and can get it dirty, I don't care; I'll get them the parts, etc. Still, very little luck. Guess the guys like those you mention, ruin it for guys like me!

                            Bill Pressler
                            Kent, OH
                            '63 Lark Daytona Skytop R1

                            quote:Originally posted by bams50

                            This is definitely the downside of old cars. As much as we love them, they will always take much more effort (and maybe money) to keep them going than modern stuff. My techs try to avoid working on classic cars for the following reasons:

                            *Lesser knowledge/more figuring out, due to being so different from what they see daily

                            *Very few specialty tools, for the same reason

                            *Tons of last time at the desk trying to find parts/info

                            *Frequently over-anal owners: Too nervous about them getting dirty, as if they take less precautions to protect their car than others'

                            *Self-centeredness- thinking because their car is a classic, it gets priority over everyone else's

                            *Disgruntled customers who cannot understand why their classic breaks down so much more than their modern car

                            We see people all the time who buy a classic car they've always wanted, only to be disappointed when they find out they take a LOT of work to be daily drivers. Even when the money's there to pay for the work, working shops are reluctant to get involved with the cars for the above reasons. Fun story: My guy did a tune-up and carb rebuild on a 70 Malibu with the 307 a few years back. Not a mint car, but an original driver. The car ran great when the customer left, but called back the next day- angry. The car had quit and wouldn't start, so naturally the guy called and said "What'd you do to my car??" Car was towed in- jumped timing. Customer said, "Well, I need this to be reliable- you should have serviced that!!" After a lengthy explanation, he agreed to the timing chain job, including pulling the pan and cleaning the teeth out of the pickup. Car runs good, customer writes another check. Couple months later, car quits again. Diagnosis? Totally plugged fuel filter- full of rust. Customer again annoyed, tech replaces filter at no charge, and refuses to work on the car any more.

                            All too often, people buy old cars to perform like a 2005, and blame the car, the seller or a mechanic when it doesn't. My solution is to never drive one of my oldies when I need to rush off somewhere, or go a long distance. To me they're my hobby- really a way of life- but not a lifeline.

                            Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                            Parish, central NY 13131

                            "Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

                            "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"



                            Bill Pressler
                            Kent, OH
                            (formerly Greenville, PA)
                            Currently owned: 1966 Cruiser, Timberline Turquoise, 26K miles
                            Formerly owned: 1963 Lark Daytona Skytop R1, Ermine White
                            1964 Daytona Hardtop, Strato Blue
                            1966 Daytona Sports Sedan, Niagara Blue Mist
                            All are in Australia now

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              David,

                              quote:The Hawk with the pulling brakes might just have a brake caliper that has reached the limit of travel due to pad wear. This usually occurs at about the same time on both sides at the same time but can occur faster on one side than the other. When you check you will think you have pleanty of pad left but the problem is the piston comes against a stop way before the pad looks warn out.

                              David L
                              I got the brakes working again. Apparently the "Mechanic on Duty" needed to do some maintenance. There are two 1/2' bolts holding the calipers on which had backing off to the point of the lock washer being totally sprung. The caliper was moving and not allowing the pads to engage on the disk.

                              I took the other wheel off too and found a loose bolt over there also.

                              This should be a warning to the guys who have disk brake equipped cars to check these bolts and tighten the others at the same time.

                              Now to find out why the transmission rear is leaking again.





                              1964 GT Hawk R2 Clone
                              Oakville, Ontario.

                              Hamilton Chapter
                              See you at the PSMCDR in Stanton Michigan September 12& 13
                              1964 GT Hawk
                              PSMCDR 2014
                              Best time: 14.473 sec. 96.57 MPH quarter mile
                              PSMCDR 2013
                              Best time: 14.654 sec. 94.53 MPH quarter

                              Victoria, Canada

                              Comment

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