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The other side of the fence

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  • The other side of the fence

    Some of you will remember this story from when I first wrote it and posted it to the old newsgroup. I'd all but forgotten about it even tho I still do drive past this place and the fence mentioned is still there.
    The older fella I dealt with that day is still there and he always waves when he sees Pete go by. I've never stopped to see if he ever sold the vehicle. It might still be settin' there! It took place in 2001.......



    Yesterday afternoon found me on a mission of mercy. I had made a run to the local UPS depot to expedite a tube full of Hawk trim to Studebaker nut, Lark Parker. Warm day, worthy cause, what more could I want?

    On the return trip I took a road I've traveled MANY times over the years. At one intersection, there's a bunch of acreage that was a wrecking yard until about 13 years ago. In fact there's still lots of car parts and other scrap metal junk lyin' around there.
    What used to be the yard-operators home and office all in one has recently been revamped into a pretty nice home by some family heirs. I've watched the remodeling progress over the last year or so.
    Next door to the revamped place is another little house that was in the same family for years. Along one side of the driveway is an interesting fence made out of old car wheels that have been welded together. This house had been occupied until sometime last year. So while trying not to look TOO obvious, I'd sometimes slow down just to take a gander at that fairly unique fence. What really piqued my interest in that fence was the hubcaps that these wheels wore. Most had some really nice caps from the 50s and earlier.
    There were some nice trim rings too! Some were readily identifiable as Stude caps. Of course, THAT point made me look each time I drove by.
    Anyway, that residence has been vacant for awhile now and I've wondered about the fate of those caps and rings. So when I spotted someone cleaning up the driveway there yesterday, I decided to stop and inquire about the caps. As I drove up in the Transtar, the fella looked up and started to chuckle........"No.......I ain't sellin' no parts off it."
    Of course, I couldn't fathom just what it was he was talkin' about. I
    mean, I hadn't even uttered a word at that point.
    I said:" I don't follow. What do you think I want?"

    "OH.." he said. "I thought you was wantin' to know if I'd sell any parts off that Stude truck sittin' over by the fence."

    I was without a clue as to what he was talkin' about. "What Stude truck? Where???"

    "Right over there. Up against that wooden fence. C'mon, I'll show ya." And we started off towards the road's edge.

    There, backed up against a high section of wood fence, set a 3/4ton 2R11 truck. Geesh! I'd driven within 8 feet of this thing for a dozen years and never had a clue it was sitting there!
    We took a look inside it, It was all there save for a horn button.
    Further, it had a rare optional radio in it. There were boxes of car parts of all kinds and description on the seat and floors of the thing. Next we managed to get the badly bent hood up and this revealed a non-stock (to 2R trucks anyway) Stude V8. A real quick check of the fenders and doors didn't reveal any rustout or even bubbles where such are common. It sported a homemade camper, sort of thing instead of having an original bed. It was ugly. But still........

    The guy and I talked for over an hour about days gone by when they had whole ROWS of Studebaker cars and trucks in the yard! He said his father-in-law (the fella who started the yard in the late 40s) had accumulated 52 bullet-nosed Studes by the mid-70s. 52 JUST bullet-noses!!! But when the price of scrap metal shot uparound '76 or so, they smashed ALL the older Studes and just retained a few late model ones. Then when the old guy's health was failing in the mid-80s, they cleaned out the yard and shut down the business.

    Somehow, the old 2R and an M5 (which has since been cusstomized) escaped the crusher. They'd actually like to find a buyer for the 2R now. He press
    No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

  • #2
    I'm sure we've all done such things at one time, or another. Of course, the joy & wonder is when we finally find out!

    Chris Pile
    Midway Chapter SDC
    The Studebaker Special
    The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

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    • #3
      Great story Bob.

      Skip Lackie
      Washington DC
      Skip Lackie

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      • #4
        Reminds me that several years ago, a wife advertised an auction sale of her deceased husband's estate. This farm was only a mile from my home where I had lived for 36 years, so you can imagine my reaction when I read the advertisment and found a Studebaker truck listed. How could a Studebaker be that close and I, or my friend Gerald, had not heard of it!!! Impossible. Gerald and I had bought up all the old Studebakers within Louisa County years ago as our hilltop acreage would attest. Armed with this unexpected information, I drove to the farm and was accosted by the wife as I drove down the long farm road. I explained I lived in town and would like to see the vehicles up for auction that weekend. It took some talking to persuade her to let me take a look and she finally relented, but made me promise not to encourage others to come until the auction. So I drove further into the farm and out of about a dozen vehicles, I spotted the Studebaker truck sitting in the tree line. I couldn't believe it- a 1945 M15-C9 flatbed, one of 4000 built with the military cab. Come to find out, it was a one family-owned truck purchased in 1945 from a Richmond, VA dealer. I purchased the truck with title at auction and it is now owned by Mike Burton of Iowa. One never knows what lurks in the woods of our neighbors!![:0]

        Frank Drumheller
        Louisa, VA
        60S-W6
        1948 M16-52 Boyer fire truck

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        • #5
          I too was at the auction that Frank attended as the truck was advertised as a late '30's model. When I saw that Gerald was there I elected not to bid on it. I also passed on an early CJ-2 jeep with column shift and an early '40's Dodge military truck. They also had a nice Thornhill wagon, but it did not meet reserve (I was the high bidder if I recall).

          Frank attempted to have a wrecker move the truck, but he could only lift it from the rear. When he did so, the wooden flatbed snapped in half. [:0][B)] Frank robbed some parts off of it and I hauled it to my place on my rollback and Mike later came to get it.

          As you can see, it was rusty. I think it spent a lot of time in a cedar hedgerow as even the top seam on the cab was rusty.



          The wooden wheeled grain drill you see on the trailer to the right was bought at the same sale. Though it has been at least 4-5 years, the grain drill is still in the same spot. [B)]

          Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful" and real Studebaker horsepower lives

          See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

          Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
          Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

          The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

          �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

          For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

          "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

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          • #6


            Gee, a Studebaker truck close to Bob's house and the only thing missing is THE HORN BUTTON[?][?][?]
            How did that happen, BOB[?][8][}]

            KURTRUK
            (read it backwards)


            KURTRUK
            (read it backwards)




            Nothing is politically right which is morally wrong. -A. Lincoln

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            • #7
              So... tell me Biggsie, is it a... what, '55 or '56 maybe[?][] Just how bad off was the thing?[}] Do you really think the guy would take three-and-a-half for it? Did you try to turn over the engine?


              Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
              K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
              Ron Smith
              Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
              Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
              K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
              Ron Smith
              Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

              Comment


              • #8
                Clunk, it bein' a 2R indicates it was a 49 thru 53 model. That's why I made the comment about it having a non-stock Stude V8 in it.

                Of course, since that story was written 7 years ago, I'm doubtful it's there anymore. I'll look next time I'm over that way tho.[^]

                Miscreant Studebaker nut in California's central valley.

                1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                1960 Larkvertible V8
                1958 Provincial wagon
                1953 Commander coupe
                1957 President two door

                No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                Comment


                • #9
                  OOps.[:I] My mistake.[)]


                  Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                  K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                  Ron Smith
                  Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
                  Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                  K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                  Ron Smith
                  Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                  Comment

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